Charts Genres Community
Charts Genres Community Settings
Login

Castlevania Bloodlines

Developer / Publisher: Konami
December 1993
Castlevania Bloodlines - cover art
Glitchwave rating
3.58 / 5.0
0.5
5.0
 
 
210 Ratings / 3 Reviews
#888 All-time
#16 for 1993
Rate / catalog Rate / catalog another release
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Releases 4
1993 Konami  
Cartridge
XNA 0 837171 600052
1994 Konami  
Cartridge
XEU 4 988602 612264
Show all 4 releases
2021 Konami  
Download
Write review
Title
The heated feud between fans of Super Castlevania IV and Rondo of Blood is something of a new point of contention between Castlevania fans. Obviously, this is due to Rondo of Blood being confined to the inaccessible Turbo-Grafix-16 in Japan, condemning it to obscurity until its worldwide release several years past its prime. Can you imagine if Rondo of Blood freed itself from its Japanese shackles during its inception? The Turbo-Grafix might have stood some ground in the 16-bit console wars, contending in a bloody battle with both Nintendo and Sega using Rondo of Blood as their killer app. Alas, this is a case of alternative history that never came to fruition and the Turbo-Grafix was set aside as the hapless third-party candidate in the running for 16-bit glory. Because Rondo of Blood never showed up to the debate promoting the Turbo-Grafix, Sega were free to continue wage their war against Nintendo without any interruptions. Sega’s ironclad tank that they paraded on the battlefield was Sonic, but the company had more weapons at their disposal. People nowadays often forget, but there was another 16-bit Castlevania game that rivaled the SNES’s Super Castlevania IV during its heyday: Castlevania: Bloodlines (or under the inferior title Castlevania: The New Generation in Europe). A Castlevania game developed exclusively for the Genesis/Mega Drive should’ve hit Nintendo closer to home than it did, but Bloodlines did not splash Nintendo in the face with the rippling wave of Konami’s treachery as intended. Nintendo fans couldn’t shell out enough money to also buy a Genesis, and the Genesis owners obviously didn’t give a shit about Castlevania. Otherwise, they would’ve bought a SNES to play Super Castlevania IV. Bloodlines is and always was the cult classic 16-bit Castlevania game, unappreciated and overlooked compared to its initial competitor and the “lost” Castlevania game that sprung up out of nowhere and stole Bloodline’s impact. The fight between Super Castlevania IV and Rondo of Blood should include Bloodlines in the conversation because it is more than worthy as a competitor.

While the European title of Bloodlines is a lame, generic subtitle for a sequel, it is however applicable to the game’s direction. Bloodlines takes place far later than any previous Castlevania game in the early 20th century at the start of the first World War. Konami experiments with a case of alternate history in which the catalyst event of assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand was enacted by Dracula’s niece Elizabeth Bartley, who is directly influenced by real-life Hungarian serial killer Countess Elizabeth Bathory. Since then, a resurrected Dracula is the cause of the Great War like Satan in “The Howling Man” episode of The Twilight Zone. The source of continental strife across an industrial age Europe is not due to avaricious empires or expanding military powers, but an ancient vampiric lord who relishes in the suffering of humanity. At least vanquishing Dracula once again is a simpler solution to the complex political bedlam that was World War 1 in real life.

The Belmont family is out of commission due to the lengthy passage of time, so Bloodlines ushers in a “new generation” of vampire hunters tasked with taking down The Count. John Morris is an American-bred vampire hunter whose choice to brandish the whip recalls Castlevania’s traditional gameplay mechanics. Spanish Eric Lecarde on the other hand wields something of a trident with a longer range. These valiant young men are the two playable protagonists in Bloodlines. Working together to eradicate the source of turmoil in a war torn Europe like other Castlevania games featuring multiple playable characters would certainly be efficient, but Konami has decided to keep John and Eric separated. The player gets the choice in selecting which of these men they’d like to play as for the duration of the game rather than swapping them during a level like in Castlevania III. Forcing the player to commit to one character may seem like an inaccessible demerit, but I think that this increases the replay value of Bloodlines. There is enough discernibility between John and Eric’s methods of defending themselves against the creatures of the night to warrant another playthrough with the other character, and the discernibility is restricted enough where one character doesn’t cause an imbalance in difficulty like Maria did in Rondo of Blood. In saying this, I feel confident enough to declare that Eric is slightly easier to play as than John. One might think a veteran Castlevania player would be more comfortable playing as John, but the slight level of versatility with Eric’s weaponry and frog-like jumping ability gives him a smidge of an advantage over his more orthodox cohort. John plays more like a compromised version of Simon Belmont from Super Castlevania IV. John can only whip diagonally in mid-air and the whip swinging technique is a tad more finicky. Some Castlevania fans might prefer John’s restraint because it makes the game more challenging, but I thought playing as John tended to be awkward.

In conjunction with expanding Castlevania’s character roster to non Belmonts, Bloodlines also reaches past the confines of the usual setting of Dracula’s castle. Dracula’s plague reaches across the entire continent of Europe, so John and Eric’s quest takes them all over the land of milk and honey to expunge Dracula’s influence. The first level still revists the remnants of the vampiric lord’s estate in Romania, but the characters never ascend to the castle’s peak. After that brief excursion, our heroes travel across the map of intercontinental Europe to five more locations. A Castlevania game has never been set outside Dracula’s castle, making this the most radical point of evolution Bloodlines introduces. One might think this decision would be a blasphemous one as the consistent setting provides a sound, continuously spooky tone fitting for a game like Castlevania. Bloodline’s premise expresses that Dracula’s influence has spread across the continent, so it allows everywhere in Europe to look like a perpetual Halloween. Frankly, the climb up to Dracula’s throne room was growing tiresome. The locations around Europe not only provide new variation to Castlevania’s progression, but explore the mythos of other cultures beyond the elements that the series has numerously established. The Shrine of Atlantis located in Greece is a temple whose sunken sea level status allows flooding water to be used as a hazard. The Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy acts as a warped, surreal platforming climb similar to something like the fourth level of Super Castlevania IV. The fourth level in Germany explores a sort of dingy, industrial setting commonly associated with the country and the Palace of Versailles in France looks as resplendent and sublime as one would expect from a gothic French landmark. The castle where Dracula is located in the UK looks like a standard final level for a Castlevania game, but it serves its purpose as a brief final trek up to the final array of bosses. Progression may not feel as organic as the typical climb does, but the series was in desperate need of a refreshing change of pace.

Besides the “blast processing,” the other appeal Sega had over their rivals at Nintendo was a more lenient stance on censorship. Nintendo had always been marketed as a “family-friendly system” and drastically toned down the blood and gore of third-party developed games released on their systems. Sega on the other hand deviated from the prudish principles of Nintendo as a marketing scheme to win over the adolescent/adult demographic. Castlevania’s home for several years had been Nintendo, but the horror-inspired series was never specifically intended for a younger audience. The greatest perk of putting a Castlevania game on the comparatively wicked Sega Genesis was that the developers could revel in the potential of excess blood and gore unseen in a Castlevania game on a Nintendo console. A bloody mess of human remains are littered all over Dracula’s castle and the wolf boss at the castle’s grounds convulses and pulsates on the ground after deleting its health bar. Harpies that reign over the skies of Italy can be decapitated by John’s whip, moving about with gore gushing from the open neckholes like a chicken. I’m also pretty sure that these same enemies possess discernable, but nippleless tits. The graphic content of Bloodlines may seem tame, especially considering its delineated by pixels, but Bloodlines would most likely be the only Castlevania game to rile up the concerned soccer moms of the western world during this era.

Unfortunately, the amplified shock factor of Bloodlines is the only way that signifies that the series has grown up. I’m starting to realize that the appeal of the Genesis lies only in gimmicks like blast processing and lack of censorship because Bloodlines greatly exposes the console’s inferior foundation compared to the SNES. Several Genesis games (Strider, Gunstar Heroes) pierce my ear drums with a sharp, grating sound design, and Bloodlines is at least more pleasant than the worst the system has to offer. However, the sound design of Bloodlines isn’t nearly as crisp as the SNES’s Super Castlevania IV. The dialogue of Rondo of Blood might sound horribly processed, but at least the sound design during the gameplay was pleasant. The moment in Bloodlines that confirmed it’s shoddy aural fidelity was during the section in Greece when the player has to destroy structures to make for sturdier platformers. Knocking down the head of a statue results in a depleting sound reminiscent of having stat decreased in an RPG. It was the least appropriate sound for a crashing marble head heavier than an elephant. As for the graphics, the starless skies seen overhead in the background are so drab and flavorless compared to the level of visual flair seen in the other two 16-bit Castlevania games. The developers had some leeway with blank backgrounds in the NES era due to the primitive nature of the system, and at least the contrasting colors with the foreground were pleasing. What’s Sega’s excuse here besides laziness?

Sega also seems to eschew from quality of life improvements made by the evolution of home consoles because so many games on the Genesis recalled an arcade-like sense of consequence with continuing. Someone at Sega apparently raised a banner over the offices of the developers that said, “save features and unlimited continues are for pussies”, and the publishing of a Castlevania without those aspects makes this all the more evident. Bloodlines makes it so the player can continue from the last checkpoint when they get a game over, but there are only a limited number of game overs before the player is forced to start the game over again. A password system was implemented for the first time in the series, but these were obsolete by the 16-bit era. Not including a save feature is one thing, but Castlevania offered unlimited continues as early as the first title on the NES. The franchise broke ground as a merciful purveyor of them when its NES contemporaries still forced the player to start from the beginning after too many deaths. Bloodlines is also just as short as the first Castlevania, so I cannot see any perspective to consider praising Sega for deviating from staples of the series. Sega wanted to screw the player, and this is further supported by the dearth of health items and no extra lives earned in Bloodlines. Sega’s initiative simply makes the game unnecessarily harsh on the player.

Every hit of damage and life counts in Bloodlines, and this is tested to the limit with the game’s bosses. Bloodlines has more bosses than all three NES Castlevanias combined, which sounds great in theory. However, the pacing of Bloodlines mixed with the decreased facilitation makes every boss encounter a tense experience. For some reason, the developers found it appropriate to include three bosses per level, appearing every other block of the level until the last boss somewhere from the ninth to twelfth one. None of the bosses are as difficult as many of the ones from previous Castlevania games, but they still take a few tries to learn their attack patterns. Because Sega has stripped away the chances to learn these attack patterns, constant boss encounters constantly feel like deliberate roadblocks. The Grim Reaper’s floating scythes finally have a learnable trajectory, but the player must fight three of the game’s previous bosses without dying. Hitting one of the cards during the Reaper fight will cause a splurge of roasts enough to end famine in a third-world country to pop out, but I only felt insulted due to the game being miserly with health items up till this point. The relentless endurance test doesn’t end here as the final fight against Elizabeth and Dracula both have multiple phases and must be beaten without dying. Elizabeth has only a few fatal tricks up her multiple sleeves and fighting Dracula might be the easiest duel with the dark lord, but every mistake counts. I’d rather try to defeat a harder version of Dracula as many times as needed than feel ultimately defeated by relinquishing my number of chances to fight him.

Castlevania: Bloodlines should always be included in the discussion among Super Castlevania IV and Rondo of Blood in the category of 16-bit Castlevania games. After all, this title was the only real competition Nintendo faced with a Castlevania game after sheltering the series with their own hardware for so long. Whether or not Rondo of Blood is superior to Super Castlevania IV is ultimately superfluous because the fight with those two combatants took place so long after it was relevant. Bloodlines was the turncoat title intended to stab Nintendo in the back and drive attention towards Sega, but Bloodlines didn’t have the same appeal as Super Castlevania IV did other than a Castlevania game on a non Nintendo system. Bloodlines regresses so far back to points even cruder than the Castlevania games on the 8-bit NES. Sega didn’t understand that cheap frills like guts and boobs were not substantial enough to mask their austere game design and lack of presentational polish. I’ve even come to appreciate Rondo of Blood more after playing Bloodlines despite criticizing that game for being more rigid compared to Super Castlevania IV. Castlevania: Bloodlines simply isn’t up to par with the excellent evolution of the franchise seen in either of its competing titles. It will always serve its position as the libertarian/green party representative of 16-bit Castlevania games.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Erockthestrange 2022-07-19T04:59:12Z
2022-07-19T04:59:12Z
7.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide
Title
Of all the classic Castlevania games that were on a home console, Castlevania Bloodlines is easily the least talked about by many, coming out on the Sega Genesis rather than the typical Nintendo consoles that the series tended to go on. With that said, after playing this, I feel like it’s genuinely a seriously underrated classic in the series that more people ought to play, taking a lot of the best parts from previous games along with further refining the design of the core gameplay to the point of it being nearly perfected. While Super Castlevania IV undoubtedly streamlined the gameplay in a number of ways from its predecessors, this feels like it wanted to keep the core gameplay more intact while adding its own unique spin on things, making this feel very different to the rest of the classic series while once again feeling like a true Castlevania game.

As was the case with the SNES, the graphical capabilities of this console in comparison to the previous generation immediately made for a visually superior game, however, even in comparison to the SNES, this game looks absolutely superb, clearly utilising the Genesis to its full capabilities, creating extremely detailed scenery that is absolutely full of atmosphere. The game’s setting amongst various places in Europe, rather than simply Dracula’s castle and the lead up to it makes for a much more varied looking game as well, with enemies extremely rarely repeating in between levels, giving a constant sense of progress as the player moves through a variety of amazing environments. Moving through these environments also proves to be alright as well, albeit not quite as fluid as in Castlevania IV, with the movement feeling much closer to the NES games through the committal jumps and overall sluggish movement, along with the whip attacking in far less directions, this time a mere 5 instead of 8.

In terms of the actual level design itself, this game is right up there with the best in the series, and while this definitely strikes me as the easiest of the games, it’s also lacking in anything truly unfair or unreasonable either, with everything feeling as if it’s a challenge that can be overcome with simple perseverance and skill, rather than needing to think of ways to cheese the game in one way or another, which could feel like a very consistent problem with some of the other titles. The game also houses some really creative obstacles to overcome, ranging from what you’d expect to find in a typical Castlevania game, to a hectic autoscroller up floating platforms while having to fend off gargoyles at the same time. This variety really reaches a peak in the final stage, which while not quite as exciting and well executed as the near flawless conclusion to Super Castlevania IV, still ends the game off on an extremely high note. This stage acts as the obligatory hardware demonstration that a fair few of these games have through gimmicks such as flipping the screen and splitting it into multiple parts that all scroll at different speeds, giving parts of the level an extremely disorienting effect that really makes even the most simple platforming much more difficult. This is balanced by this section itself actually having generally forgiving obstacles placed around, making the challenge getting to grips with the player’s position as opposed to having to overcome the obstacle itself while also being unsure of positioning, making for an all-around fair, interesting concept executed well.

Overall, this game definitely is another one that feels truly unique in its place within the series and honestly also feel like an extremely good gateway into it, having the general feel and control of a classic Castlevania game without having the same sort of brutal difficulty and glaring issues as the NES ones would exhibit from time to time. The large variety of challenges the player faces combined with the impressive presentation of the game also help to not just make this the most accessible game in the early part of the series, but also one of the absolute best to me, extremely remarkable stuff for sure.

Scattershot Statements:

As is tradition with the mainline Castlevania games, music is absolutely top notch here, just straight up excellent stuff.

This game went heavy on how many bosses it included, which is honestly fine given how these are some of the best.

The gear golem looks incredibly cool with the amount of moving parts in it, also happens to be a really great fight that avoids ever feeling unreasonable.

Subweapon candles being different from regular candles was something that the series sorely needed since the beginning, extremely cool to see them finally add this, even if it’s in a game where subweapons are overall less useful.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Kempokid 2021-06-26T09:25:21Z
2021-06-26T09:25:21Z
4.0
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide
Title
Bloodlines is sort of considered an overlooked gem of the Castelvania series, having come out on the what many people considered to be lesser console, Sega Genesis. Castlevania IV was a huge step forward for the franchise, so it was only natural this game would expand on that. This game feels similar to Castlevania IV, similar graphics, similar locations, enemies, similar story structure. Bloodlines also lets you play as 2 characters, although they both go through the same areas so its really just what weapon you prefer. It's a pretty solid game and isn't super challenging, and it is fairly short as well. But it still does have some frustrations that have plagued the series and it's not quite as revolutionary as Castlevania IV. Plus Rondo of Blood would also come out the same year and despite being shorter than this, it made greater advances on the series. This is still a solid Castlevania and worth playing, but its not one I'd consider worth playing on a regular basis.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
jweber14 2018-10-26T22:59:14Z
2018-10-26T22:59:14Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide

Catalog

ChuckB Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-25T20:32:00Z
2022-11-25T20:32:00Z
3.5
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
IndustrialHz Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-25T01:10:38Z
2022-11-25T01:10:38Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
CrashV1978 Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-14T02:10:23Z
Mega Drive/Genesis • XNA
2022-11-14T02:10:23Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
bci9215 Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-11T11:03:15Z
2022-11-11T11:03:15Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
KCTal Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-11T09:37:27Z
2022-11-11T09:37:27Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
SUPER_Lonely_Panda Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-07T04:27:54Z
2022-11-07T04:27:54Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Limpdisko バンパイアキラー 2022-11-06T20:27:05Z
Mega Drive/Genesis • JP
2022-11-06T20:27:05Z
4.0
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Baller16 Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-06T00:49:49Z
2022-11-06T00:49:49Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
GiornoMio Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-02T16:07:35Z
2022-11-02T16:07:35Z
7.7 /10
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Boa Trilha Sonora Dinâmico Agradável
1068396 Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-11-02T05:31:51Z
2022-11-02T05:31:51Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Gavel Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-10-23T00:39:56Z
2022-10-23T00:39:56Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Agustinb3ab2 Castlevania Bloodlines 2022-10-11T22:02:20Z
2022-10-11T22:02:20Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Mega Drive
Player modes
Single-player
Media
1x Cartridge
Franchises
Also known as
  • Vampire Killer
  • バンパイアキラー
  • Castlevania: The New Generation
  • View all [3] Hide

Comments

Rules for comments
  • Be respectful! All the community rules apply here.
  • Keep your comments focused on the game. Don't post randomness/off-topic comments. Jokes are fine, but don't post tactless/inappropriate ones.
  • Don't get in arguments with people here, or start long discussions. Use the boards for extended discussion.
  • Don't use this space to complain about the average rating, chart position, genre voting, others' reviews or ratings, or errors on the page.
  • Don't comment just to troll/provoke. Likewise, don't respond to trollish comments; just report them and ignore them.
  • Any spoilers should be placed in spoiler tags as such: [spoiler](spoiler goes here)[/spoiler]
Note: Unlike reviews, comments are considered temporary and may be deleted/purged without notice.
  • _Ryu 2021-07-10 20:17:18.273812+00
    Better than Castlevania IV.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • SemtexRevolution 2021-10-10 03:30:35.456307+00
    It's really not but it is pretty sick
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • Agustinb3ab2 2022-02-25 03:00:32.131192+00
    Eric has fulfilled his destiny as a vampire hunter.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • ... 2022-03-05 00:03:38.671017+00
    this one sucks
    reply
    • SMZXW 2022-05-16 03:16:08.317993+00
      lol
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • SMZXW 2022-05-16 03:17:22.82111+00
    the new generation lmao what the fuck where you euros thinking
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • _Arcueid_ 2022-06-27 17:23:35.88917+00
    Maybe for censorship reasons, who knows. The Japanese version was simply called Vampire Killer but they didn't want to use that name because there already was an MSX2 game named like that.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • SMZXW 2022-07-04 13:24:56.648757+00
    michiru yamane's legend begins
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • More comments New comments (0) Loading...
Please login or sign up to comment.

Suggestions

There was an error saving your submission.
ADVERTISEMENT
Examples
1980s-1996
23 mar 2015
8 apr - 12 may 2015
1998-05
Report
Download
Image 1 of 2