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The Talos Principle

Developer: Croteam Publisher: Devolver Digital
11 December 2014
The Talos Principle - cover art
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789 Ratings / 4 Reviews
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#9 for 2014
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The Talos Principle ended up being one of the most interesting games I’ve played in quite a long time, but not quite for the reasons that some would expect. It wasn’t the puzzle design that did this for me, as while tightly constructed, it also feels like there’s nothing overly special here either, whether it’s the ways in which many of the mechanics at play are relatively simple, or the fact that it feels clear that some of them were far from explored to their full potential. But no, what actually makes this such a fascinating and uniquely appealing game is the way in which it handles its narrative and manages to overcome the frequent shortcomings of the medium of video games as a whole for such aspects. What might start off as a seemingly run of the mill game is able to develop in a number of ways to truly become a remarkable experience even despite some flaws that can bog certain things down.

I’ve often found that games have a habit of not being able to craft a narrative with quite as much nuance and focus as it seems to want to, often a biproduct of having to tailor the narrative to the fact that the medium is interactive and needs to ensure that such a crucial element of it is not forgotten or at odds with what else it presents. This can often lead to a game either not exploring themes as much as could be done due to wanting to avoid killing the pacing of it, or to not explore things as much as it otherwise could due to wanting the player to feel as if they have an active role in the ideas being conveyed while maintaining a sense of player agency. What this often can lead to is games that while thematically rich, may also come off as either simplistic or lacking in the nuance that some other mediums are able to portray. This is where The Talos Principle shines for me however, with its strong philosophical themes being written in a very thought provoking way that never distracts from the core gameplay loop and instead finds itself tying very closely into almost every facet of the experience. The relatively common philosophical themes that pertain to concepts such as the tangibility of consciousness or the factors that contribute to personhood might not be treading any new ground, but are presented in such a way to almost force the player to think about their own stances on such topics.

When presented with such questions in the game, any contradiction or lack of conviction in one’s own beliefs are challenged, forcing the player to think even more deeply about what are ultimately very abstract concepts in order to attempt to further deepen their own understanding. This manages to further develop with themes of free will being elegantly incorporated through the way that none of the characters you interact with are flawless in their reasoning either, all having rather flawed perspectives that the game frames as correct for most of its runtime. Utilising the game design itself as an unreliable narrator not only provides far more depth to the game as a whole, but is able to further divert attention to the player’s own thoughts as opposed to simply being led along a separate path just because the game told them to, strengthening the story’s focus on independence immensely and being a really nice meta-twist to add in. I strongly appreciate the way this is able to justify its existence as well through being optional but near impossible to accidentally miss. This contributes to player agency, allowing those who only wish to experience the puzzle gameplay side of things to do exactly that, while being able to make players get distracted with the narrative content feel as if it’s entirely their own choice, therefore not getting frustrated at the game tearing control away from them. Further intrigue is also added through the lore provided by scattered text documents that gives more depth and weight to the setting of The Talos Principle, once again without being overbearing, instead providing some interesting, different perspectives about what is explored throughout the rest of the game, overall making for one of the best written games I’ve played that utilises its medium in clever, thoughtful ways.

The puzzles and gameplay is where I find there to be some flaws with all of this however and ultimately end up stopping me from thinking that this is a total masterpiece, even if some aspects are very cool. The puzzle mechanics themselves are actually rather interesting in some ways, especially the idea of just, not having a core mechanic and instead focusing in a number of supplementary mechanics to work with a simple first person controller. The reason this ultimately works however, is the way in which these mechanics synergise with one another rather effectively in order to feel very meaningful, with possibilities to utilise them in different ways to get past seemingly simple solutions being varied while being tightly constructed. The main issue is that despite it all being rather clever in this way, and having some amazing puzzles that are deceptively simple and just take a bit of planning, the way in which quite a few of them are framed and constructed doesn’t quite feel right. Often it feels like part of the challenge comes from the game obscuring the tools you have to actually work with as opposed to coming up with solutions to solve a problem clearly at hand. This usually is done through placing a lot of the tools required to get through the puzzles far apart and leading to a situation where the player will often question whether they can’t get through an aspect of the puzzle because they haven’t thought of the solution, or whether they’ve simply missed finding a key piece of the puzzle that would make everything click.

This becomes particularly frustrating later on where the puzzles can seem increasingly impossible to solve due to how difficult they can seem, further feeding into questioning whether you even can solve it with what you have or whether the game’s gone and hidden something important out of sight. I also found the structure of the game a bit frustrating where there were a lot of puzzles that would have preliminary steps to get other pieces of equipment, though this was a more case by case thing. While this could sometimes lead to making it feel like there was a nice sense of progression to what you had to do, other times it could feel like mindless busywork, especially when the steps to get them can be so dead-easy and obvious even late into the game. These issues can seriously make later portions of the game feel like a drag, and made a lot of building C almost make me drop the game entirely before being able to see the best content it had to offer. I’ll also say that I think a lot of the bonus stars in this just outright suck, feeling less like extra puzzles that involve some out of the box thinking to get done, and more akin to an Eye Spy game where you’re combing the environments to find hidden things to use instead, making these parts often feel horribly unsatisfying to the point where I barely tried past a certain point, fortunately they weren’t mandatory. Despite my many criticisms however, I did still enjoy the puzzle solving element for the most part and found it a nice middle ground, with the later stuff not being easy by any means, but not being unreasonable either for the most part, usually being rather logical and straightforward once you think things through, making the gameplay mostly enjoyable despite having these aforementioned issues, they certainly don’t outright ruin the game despite making it drag.

Overall, all of these elements, combined with a sense of mysterious wonder and beauty to the landscapes make The Talos Principle a remarkable game in a lot of ways, with its approach to narrative being especially inspired in how well it’s all handled. Honestly a must play for those who enjoy puzzle games or games that delve into philosophical themes quite strongly, because this does both elements rather well, even if I gravitate more towards its thematic content then that of gameplay in this case.
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Kempokid 2021-08-23T09:09:33Z
2021-08-23T09:09:33Z
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The Only Good Part of the Game

The Talos Principle is an amazing story trapped inside a terrible game. That’s not something that I thought I’d ever say about a Croteam title. In a world of superfluous stories told through billion dollar cutscenes, these guys stuck to their caveman ways of drawing genitals on the walls and having a laugh at it before going out and clubbing each other to death. Quality writing is the last thing you’d expect from them.

However, the moment I started looking deeper into how this game was made, it all started to make sense.

Chris Baker made an article about the game for Gamasutra where he interviewed the two writers, Tom Jubert and Jonas Kyratzes. Croteam already had 80% of the puzzles implemented when they started thinking of what to do with the story. All they had outlined at this point is that this will be some sort of simulation about robots, god, existence, and other things that would make an average Serious Sam fan fall asleep.

This is when one of the developers thought of calling in the Jubert assist, because he was impressed with his work on another rather philosophical platformer, The Swapper. Jubert then invited his friend Jonas, and the two got to the Herculean task of figuring out just how to brute force a story into a nearly finished abstract puzzle game.

For what it’s worth, I don’t think they could’ve done a better job with that. This fundamentally bad approach led to some issues that I will go over later, but in spite of that, they managed to properly contextualize the puzzles and deliver writing so compelling that it almost felt like a reward and a breath of fresh air after trudging through the tedious and poorly designed puzzles.

The story of The Talos Principle takes a novel approach to the old premise of humanity getting wiped out by a virus. Instead of tales of deteriorating society, zombies, or cool violence with rusty cars and BDSM outfits, it proposes a very idealistic and beautiful scenario where, when faced with imminent extinction, a group of scientists comes together to archive and preserve everything about humanity.

One of them in particular, Alexandra Drennan, headed a project that had a goal of creating an AI that would be able to gain consciousness, intelligence, and free will. Through nearly two dozen audio logs scattered about the place, you learn about her sheer love for humans, the civilizations we have built, art we have created, and the progress we achieved.

You also learn why created this program to begin with. Humans will perish, but machines they’ve made will outlast and persevere, and in a way, humanity will persist through them. So here you are, a program running through a series of puzzles until you become “human enough” to defy your creator and gain the privilege of escaping the simulation to experience the world that humans have left, carrying on their legacy.

This is technically a spoiler, but spoiling this is like spoiling that at the end of Dark Souls you beat Gwyn and can choose to rekindle the flames or to become the dark lord. It’s basically the main plotline, but it doesn’t matter because the meat of the narrative and storytelling is in the item descriptions, in the character dialogues, and in the environments that you journey through. The places of Dark Souls tell you more of a story than cutscenes ever did.

In The Talos Principle, that meat is all within the computers that you see at the start of each location (sometimes there are more hidden around), in the audio logs, and QR messages plastered all over the place. The latter are rather interesting as they are the only elements of storytelling that connect you with other programs running through Elohim’s (the local god that gives you purpose, and you’re meant to defy) garden.

Those QR messages help to feel just slightly less lonely in this game, and they’re often grouped together to create a little dialogue between different programs as they form their own opinions and typically disagree with each other. You will eventually learn to recognize their names (not that there are many), and what they believe in, which has a slight payoff in the final section of the game.

Outside of audio logs, though, computers are the ones doing the heavy lifting here. Each typically has 3 text logs within. A collection of random notes that contain either extremely dull, surface level philosophical musings or various notes from the scientists who worked on the project.

I found the personal logs to be far more valuable, as they typically help to flesh out their whole group of researchers and how the world ended. Some just give you exposition about their project, while others are more sentimental.

They are set up in a way where as you advance through the game, so do the logs advance in time, which means that some of the first logs you read will be full of excitement and optimism about this great endeavor, while by the end you see more and more depressing logs of people meeting their last moments, choosing to go out on their own terms, or trying to enjoy the last days on earth with a gaming LAN party. It’s very human, it’s touching, and it’s honestly more thought-provoking than dozens upon dozens of tiny logs that reference real life texts or philosophers.

Computers are also where you meet Milton. An enigmatic character that talks to you through the computer. They are primarily interesting due to their role. Milton is there to incite defiance, therefore named “The Serpent” to avoid any accidental subtlety.

They will ask you a variety of questions, many pertaining to philosophy, but whichever answer you pick, they will attempt to point out a contradiction for it. It’s an annoying character to talk to, because you are rarely offered the dialogue you’d want, and they always peace off after yet another annoying gotcha. As obnoxious as it is, they do a good enough job of offering some questions to think about, and engage you with one of the main themes of the game, questioning and curiosity.

There is one especially poignant log that proposes that you shouldn’t doubt everything, as it leads to apathy, and Milton is basically the face of that. They don’t believe in anything and will argue against everything, because finding contradictions led them to think that nothing is true. Instead, it’s better to question everything, as questioning things leads to finding new knowledge or discovering lies instead of just rejecting it all.

That said, I still deleted that mf at the end of my playthrough, very glad that the game actually gave me that option, even though they do kinda try to make you feel bad about it.

Square Peg in a Round Hole

The only problem here is that at no point it felt like I’m playing the game and experiencing the story of said game. Notes in video games already have a bit of stigma, and for a good reason. It’s like the yellow paint of narrative. A quick and lazy way of injecting some storytelling into your game when you can’t come up with a more natural way of delivering it. Now imagine if basically the entire game is just notes.

This is where aforementioned issues start to crop up. I’ve read that Gamasutra interview after getting so disappointed with the storytelling that I started researching into how it was made. It was so absurd and so frustrating to me that they put so much effort into this narrative, but then had the game undermine it every step of the way, with the very final sequence being the sole exception.

Reading that interview really made things make sense, but it also just made me more angry that Croteam approached the storytelling with so little respect that they thought it’s totally fine to just slap that in when the game is nearly finished. They didn’t even learn from this! According to that Gamasutra article, the same thing happened again with the DLC (which I was too exhausted and annoyed to play), but this time they invited the writers when the game was only half-finished, instead of 80% done, how thoughtful of them!

You just can’t make a great game when you divorce the storytelling from your design process. A good narrative is woven into the gameplay, they coexist, they boost one another to create something that is more than the sum of its parts. In The Talos Principle, it’s just oil and water. You could rip it out and present the story purely as text and audio, maybe as some sort of website that you browse through, and it would likely become a better experience.

While it’s true that puzzles are contextualized within the game’s story, that’s as far as it goes. Puzzles are there to make the programs more intelligent as they solve increasingly harder problems. Solving all the hardest puzzles (red sigils) is required to unlock the tower floors and transcend, so that part tracks too. But defiance? Curiosity? Questioning what you are told? None of those or other themes are meaningfully connected with the puzzles or the environments.

While some of them do require creating thinking, I felt more defiant towards the end of original Portal where Chel escapes the confines of the testing chambers, using the portal gun to go against Glados and the carefully laid out path she was meant to follow. In Talos, while you can occasionally break puzzles thanks to extremely janky pixel-perfect lineups or collision boxes, most of the game is still about following a strict ruleset to a t.

Everything is clipped off to avoid unwanted platforming and breaking of the rules. Even basic jumps are usually done by hovering over an area and seeing your footprints on top, indicating that you will land there if you press jump. The physics are strictly cosmetics as well, so don’t even think of stacking boxes or dropping items to get up somewhere. The game is so against any sort of freedom and creativity, that it ended up making intended solutions feel unintuitive, since the default answer to “I wonder if I could” is always “no”.

The environments are extremely bland as well. While the story marvels about the achievements and history of human civilization, Croteam litters the areas with the assets from Serious Sam 3 and ones that might have been made for Serious Sam 4.

I don’t have an issue with companies reusing assets, but at least has to make sense. In TTP I could never shake off the feeling that it was just cheaply cobbled together from things that they already had on hand, with minimal resources put into producing anything original for this game specifically. This is a simulation made by someone who was deeply inspired by the things humans built, by technology, knowledge, progress. None of that is reflected in the environments.

I hate making suggestions or criticism that comes downs to “just have more money and put more stuff into the game, it’s that easy” because we all know it’s not easy. Games cost a lot of money to make, and it takes a lot of time. Small companies can’t afford to just pump resources into projects that might not even pay off, and a philosophy focused puzzle game is definitely not something that was made with the thought of selling like hot cakes.

Yet, it’s something that added to the dissonance. The game is sorely lacking any visual variety, let alone areas that don’t look like someone just quickly put them together in the Talos Puzzle Editor, if such a thing existed. If the various levels could’ve taken you across the world and implemented all the amazing things the humans have built into the puzzles itself, it could’ve been a great way to connect the story to the game. Make the program smarter through puzzles, but also show it the sights that inspired awe from its creators.

It’s a useless hypothetical, but I can’t help but wonder how great this game could’ve been if the puzzles were built with the idea of reinforcing the story and themes, instead of the latter trying desperately to cover up the fact that they came late to the party and nobody there even knows their name.

And Now, the Puzzles

I imagine it would’ve been so much easier to forgive or at least ignore the discordance between the different parts of the game if the actual gameplay was golden. However, this is where TPP is very much in-line with everything else Croteam made (except for sweet and underrated Serious Sam 2).

It’s unrefined, unpolished, repetitive, and at many points feels outright antagonistic to the player. I have 30 hours in this game, I was definitely AFK for maybe 5 of those, but in general you might notice that people who have completed the game have quite a few hours logged in it. You might assume that it’s a result of the game having lots of content. Well, yes and no.

Talos does have quite a lot of content, there are over 120 puzzles in the game, plus the aforementioned logs, as well as secret stars and various easter eggs to discover. However, it’s also because the game has no respect for your time, like at all, it’s almost offensive.

The game has a sort of nesting doll structure. You start in a hub (huge open area with nothing in it), from there you must physically travel to a smaller hub (absolutely massive but empty rooms), within those hubs are teleports to puzzle areas (usually gigantic open spaces), then within those areas are individual walled off puzzles.

You can move pretty fast if you sprint by pressing shift, but you will still spend several hours just going from one place to another, which gets old near instantly. There’s just no sights in this game to make traversal at least slightly tolerable.

Then there’s the time waste within puzzles themselves. Talos has several hazards that will kill you, which reset the puzzle, and you can also get softlocked, forcing you to reset the puzzle. Normally that’s not a big deal because most puzzle games operate on such a small scale that replaying up to a certain part if you know the solution is not a big deal. But, you guessed it, not the case in TPP.

To give a rough impression, imagine playing a Minesweeper, but instead of being able to just click on everything as fast as you can, you are a small minesweeper man inside that field, and you have to actually take time to walk all over the board to see the numbers on the ground and interact with the squares. Now imagine how obnoxious it would be to click on the bomb when the field is almost finished and then having to rethread the whole process of early game Minesweeper, sounds fun?

TPP is very “physical” so you have to actually go all over the level to get the lay of the land, and if you want to use any item, you have to carry it around, only one thing at a time. Some levels require a decent bit of time to figure out, and can take minutes to set up the whole solution on top of that. When you make a single mistake and have to redo everything, it doesn’t feel like a meaningful punishment. It feels like the game designer kicking you in the nuts for no reason, since all that is being taken from you is the time you have left on this planet.

120+ is also just too many puzzles. I was exhausted by the end of the game, only driven by brain worms that compel me to finish the games I play even if the experience becomes miserable. I felt like Neon White was too long as well while playing it. That game is absolutely loaded with content, but I couldn’t complain because despite that, I never felt like the actual levels were bad, they all offered something special. In TPP, on the other hand, many of the puzzles had me just going through the motions.

They’re so formulaic that most of the time the solution will spring in your mind after you get the idea of the layout and the tools at your disposal, since knowing both of the things greatly narrows down what you can even do. Talos has a very modular approach to puzzles, so you will see a lot of elements repeated verbatim instead of being recontextualized to keep things fresh.

It’s not all bad, and some are genuinely creative and quite satisfying to solve, but those are few and far between. It’s very much quantity over quality, and by far the best part only comes at the very end. The final gauntlet before you reach the peak of the tower has you actually cooperate with other programs, while also being impeded by one of them. Something that would’ve been cool to see in parts of the game that aren’t the very end of it.

Verticality is another thing that this final gauntlet has over others. Most levels in TPP probably could be remade in the vanilla Build Engine, they’re so damn flat. I have no clue why it took them until the final tower puzzles to make multi-layered levels. The game is desperately lacking in variety, and playing with space more could’ve been a great way to alleviate this issue.

The most creative thing the game does in this regard is when you have to interact with things beyond the level boundaries, but the game typically reserves it for obtuse bonus starts that became far too tedious to pursue after I got enough to open the first secret area with silver sigils.

That’s also something that really made a few of the puzzles annoying. Difficulty in TPP can be very inconsistent, and the most difficult puzzles aren’t the ones that require careful thought and clever solutions, it’s usually because they just have so many elements and ways to use them that finding the right combination requires extra tedium of trial and error.

Just as everyone can design a combat arena that is a corridor that spills out 1000 Kleers at you, anyone can make a puzzle and then keep adding step after step to the solution until it feels convoluted and unintuitive enough to pass off as difficult and “tricky”. However, a good hard puzzle is usually like a really funny joke, it’s not a word longer than it needs to be, and typically catches you by surprise, instead of trying to put together enough funny things to be “really funny”

Done

TPP might be a solid offer for people are just champing at the bit for just a crumb of puzzling, but I’m not one of those people. I started off impressed and pleasantly surprised, only to come out frustrated, disappointed, and even more convinced that Croteam never learns from their mistakes, still choosing to treat games as products where “story” or “design” are just unnecessary buzzwords that get in the way DA GAMEPLAY BABY.

I will play Talos 2 at some point, probably after I manage to forget how miserable this game was. Maybe it will even shatter my presumptions and address the grievances, but it’s hard to have that much hope.
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Gundroog 2024-04-07T10:48:22Z
2024-04-07T10:48:22Z
2.0
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Played the whole game in a week. I never have been addicated to a game, but this was the first game i was super interrested in. I will go in greater depth:
Good points
First of all the story is very good. The way i see the game, is a story about the constant battle between faith/ doing what is asked of you VS doing your own thing. During your game you will challenged in your believes, do you plan on believing the serpant or believing the gods? Its all up to you, gathered with the notes you gather during the game you can make your own choice on who and why you believe them. The story isn't isn't someone talking to you but the whole game is to figure your own story out.
Puzzles. Some puzzles while take hours to complete, while others take only minutes! Its all about perspective.... But i think its a very creative way of making puzzles.

Bad points
Graphics. If you want better graphics then 2016 unity has to offer, you should not buy this game.
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Aappen21 2024-03-28T20:47:27Z
2024-03-28T20:47:27Z
10.0
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puzzler amazing
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made me feel really like i was going to throw up every time i played it but still verry good.
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chipchipleythesnake 2018-03-14T03:45:47Z
2018-03-14T03:45:47Z
4.5
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The gameplay was mostly tolerable. I don't remember any standout puzzles, but I remember at least a couple of terrible ones (especially that obnoxious bomb level in Egypt). The game feels very samely and routine, and at the same time lacks a strong central mechanic (like the line in The Witness or portals in you know what). Difficulty rises (very slowly), environments change (not much), but it is hard to notice any progression or variation in game design: you solve essentially the same generic gate/box/laser stuff from the beginning of the game till the end. Level design outside of puzzle rooms felt really strange, I'd say even amateurish: broad empty spaces with some ugly copy-paste landscapes.

Narrative-wise the game left me with mixed feelings. The main storyline was okay and pretty fitting for a puzzle game, but it did nothing special. I liked the audio logs, sometimes they were touching and thought-provoking. I strongly disliked the text logs and that whole text adventure sidequest, it felt very dull.

Overall, The Talos Principle is decent, but it is not near on the same level of quality as my genre favorites, Portal and The Witness. I just can't help but compare it to those masterpieces and it looks very mediocre in comparison, don't understand how it managed to get almost as much praise.

(Also, the game is like 8 hours too long.)
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around 2018-03-21T10:43:02Z
2018-03-21T10:43:02Z
5 /10
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A modern classic best experienced with an open-mind and no expectations. It builds upon Portal's reinvention of the puzzle genre, while amping the complexity and offering a moving story about humanity and the future of AI. Rarely has a game gripped me for many hours, surprised me emotionally or made me smile due to the sheer cleverness of its creators. Those who don't find appeal in puzzles will probably not find much enjoyment here, but if you are open to the genre you may find a new favorite.
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SUPER_Lonely_Panda 2016-04-06T00:04:11Z
2016-04-06T00:04:11Z
5.0
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Catalog

lakemachine The Talos Principle 2024-05-28T08:49:58Z
2024-05-28T08:49:58Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Kimmu The Talos Principle 2024-05-22T09:04:23Z
2024-05-22T09:04:23Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
foiebump The Talos Principle 2024-05-20T19:34:24Z
2024-05-20T19:34:24Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
to_noid_or_not_to_noid The Talos Principle 2024-05-20T18:18:45Z
Windows / Mac / Linux/Unix
2024-05-20T18:18:45Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
niallquinn The Talos Principle 2024-05-19T23:06:42Z
2024-05-19T23:06:42Z
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
SphoricusII The Talos Principle 2024-05-17T01:42:03Z
2024-05-17T01:42:03Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
steam
chojnito The Talos Principle 2024-05-16T13:51:33Z
2024-05-16T13:51:33Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
roman_cancel The Talos Principle 2024-05-15T03:14:41Z
2024-05-15T03:14:41Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Nezbie The Talos Principle 2024-05-12T22:56:53Z
2024-05-12T22:56:53Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Bubu66 The Talos Principle 2024-05-12T02:53:15Z
2024-05-12T02:53:15Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
scoterinaia The Talos Principle 2024-05-11T06:20:55Z
2024-05-11T06:20:55Z
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
eighteensecond The Talos Principle 2024-05-09T09:19:38Z
2024-05-09T09:19:38Z
2.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
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Comments

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  • Previous comments (28) Loading...
  • LILY69420 2023-11-13 20:19:09.55205+00
    cat
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  • guerschman 2024-01-16 00:11:57.652362+00
    baller
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  • altertide0 2024-02-07 16:41:34.444823+00
    Great themes and mystery, very enjoyable puzzles, but the lack of a central mechanic really drags it down for me. Feels like a puzzle theme park and not in a good way.
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  • _sawdustanddiamonds_ 2024-03-24 17:42:15.590705+00
    got stuck and put it aside in the midst of some of the more difficult puzzles but i decided to start back from the beginning and im reminded of how great this game is. so incredibly thematically rich and aesthetically wonderful, very nostalgic for me as well tbh. amazing game, though i do somewhat agree that there is a tension created by the lack of cohesion between puzzles. they also don't feel very thematically linked to the rest of the game either. still wonderful tho
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  • kevinlater 2024-04-22 19:02:23.577544+00
    beautiful game
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  • karczma 2024-05-16 13:32:26.904475+00
    i fucking hate the bombs they startle me so bad
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