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The Legend of Zelda

ゼルダの伝説

Developer / Publisher: Nintendo
21 February 1986
The Legend of Zelda [ゼルダの伝説] - cover art
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3.43 / 5.0
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1,231 Ratings / 5 Reviews
#1,176 All-time
#4 for 1986
Many years ago, the prince of darkness Ganon stole the Triforce of Power. Princess Zelda had the Triforce of Wisdom. She divided it into 8 pieces to hide it from Ganon before she was captured. As the young hero, Link, you need to find the 8 pieces of the Triforce and save the Princess.
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ゼルダの伝説 1 ファミコン ミニ
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Playing this game once again in 2016, i realize how much the whole Souls franchise is based on it.
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The NES is a system that becomes more interesting to really mull over the more time I spend thinking about games as something that are a holistic experience that can’t be neatly segregated into arbitrary boxes that you can each neatly explain entirely on its own terms. The idea of atmosphere being something that can fall into a separate category to gameplay or narrative for example, is one such example of the inherently flawed way at looking like games like this, rather than seeing them more as a selection of aspects of a title that all inform one another to become something greater than the sum of its parts. All this is to say, that for as janky and unintuitive as it could be in a lot of areas, the NES truly felt like the first home console which designers realised they had the capability to make something that was more than simply “fun”. While there are obviously games before the NES that were able to provide a more nuanced and complex take on games than what you’d typically find at the arcades on early PCs, especially with a lot of those early text adventure games, the NES realising this feels so significant due to it being from the first generation of home consoles to lean a bit heavier into this idea, the first system marketed towards such a wide audience that had a sizeable amount of developers transcending the boundaries they’d set beforehand rather than keeping it to a comparatively more niche crowd at the time. While there were still a lot of holdovers from the arcade era, with a lot of games still focusing intensely on polishing the more pure gameplay experiences, and not just the amount of early turn based JRPGs, but also ones like The Legend of Zelda.

The Legend of Zelda also presents the audience with one of the clearest pictures of the teething problems with transitioning into this different ideology too however, seeing this attempt at creating an expansive world to embody the spirit of freewheeling adventure while still finding one’s footing with an interactive adventure that focuses hard on the interactivity rather than feeling more like the player having to understand exactly what the game is wanting at all times with you simply guiding things along. It’s a tough balance and one that clearly has its elements that work and don’t in the context of this game specifically. There are so many abstract ideas floating around here that are not entirely utilised to their fullest potential, and yet there’s an undeniable creative focus that runs through the entire experience. The world might not be particularly lively, both with the repetitive enemy waves and the almost total lack of characters besides Link himself, but it’s still undeniable that not only does the world feel rather expansive, but there’s a very strong sense of freedom that it provides. The almost total lack of objectives other than the overarching goal of “collect the trifoce pieces and slay Ganon” is an especially worthwhile point of interest for crafting this feeling of freedom with how you approach the game, with very little being actively gated off by needing to accomplish other goals and more accomplishing these goals to get a more concrete sense of knowledge for how to approach certain secrets and puzzles.

The bits and pieces of direction that the game does provide tend to be quite nice as well in striking this balance between nudging you in the right direction without outright tearing you away from feeling as if the player is the one doing all the exploring and uncovering this mysterious world on their own. My favourite way this is done is as simple as numbering each of the dungeons as a way to ensure that the player doesn’t hit a late part of the game, struggle to it a lot, and then begin questioning whether they should be here, rather just straight up informing the player if they’ve gone a bit too far. While a more nuanced, organic approach is likely something that could work in a more modern title with a more conventional sense of how to approach game progression (in this case something that could be utilised in some interesting and effective ways), the fact that so many NES games were as blatantly unforgiving as they were means that this was a worthy compromise to make in order to make the experience as a whole less frustrating while still feeling like a very open experience. In regards to frustration, I’d say that people are often a tad too harsh about how obtuse this game really is, as while yeah, there are a ton of hidden areas that are completely unmarked that lead to secret areas and the like, none of them are actually required to progress and feel closer to additional bonuses towards those who are willing to spend the time to go insane with trying to uncover everything it has to offer. They’re definitely the kind of thing that could be conveyed better for sure, but it never feels intrusive towards the core gameplay, especially when you keep in mind that providing a player this huge area that felt like there could be cool secrets underneath every rock or bush was part of the point.

Outside of this, there are definitely a couple of hints that entirely fly past in ways that feel too out there, especially the infamous one where you need to feed the hungry monster a piece of meat to progress with basically no concrete hints anywhere of this being a thing to do, but a lot of it feels surprisingly intuitive as long as you operate under the logic of the game as opposed to how things would logically work in a more realistic setting. While it can all feel a bit abstract at points, it also feels very cohesive in how it’s presented, with each piece of information being something very tangible to work off of, with a lot only really making sense once you’ve already looked around and found the place to begin with. It feeds into this core design philosophy where the player is meant to explore and discover things for themselves, if you don’t know what something means, check places you haven’t before, try out weird ideas that vaguely resemble the hints given, don’t be stopped by fear of the idea not working, just give it a shot anyway. It’s a bit messy, but it’s undoubtedly both ambitious and something that’s executed way more cleanly than you might expect as long as you go in with the mindset of experimentation being key.

With all that said, while games clearly achieving their goals in certain respects is entirely admirable, it’s not the be all end all of the experience either, as there are a few frustrating points that rear their heads that make exploration feel far less enjoyable than it could be. The biggest issue is with the way combat is handled, Link simply doesn’t have the mobility required to make a lot of the encounters you’ll be facing feel particularly reasonable, and while the game gradually gives you more tools that can lead to slightly more offbeat thinking in how to deal with situations, it’s not enough to fix the fact that there almost feels like a fundamental disconnect between the abilities of the player and the obstacles placed in their way at times, especially on screens that can be flooded by projectiles or enemies that can’t easily be knocked back. This makes the exploration lose some of its lustre when basically every screen is full of the enemies too, sometimes being fun little challenges to take on as you’re progressing, but other times feeling closer to a frustrating hindrance that are there to get a few cheap shots in and not much else, with the attempts at populating the world with these dangerous creatures not entirely working effectively when you’ll be facing the same small group of enemies throughout, with a lot of the visual deviation ultimately being functionally identical, which ends up hindering some of that sense of discovery once you start predicting what’s coming up ahead without much of note beyond the journey to discover the secret to get to that point. Obviously the destination isn’t everything in these games, but when the destination is yet another dungeon that ends up throwing a few too many enemies at you without much to speak of in terms of unique design ideas, it does end up wearing out its welcome a bit. Also very much not a fan of only respawning with 3 hearts whenever you revive, basically makes the iconic sword beam less useful as the game progresses unless you’re willing to grind at basic enemies for a while or go back to a fairy fountain every time you die.

On the whole my thoughts on the first Legend of Zelda are a bit warmer than they originally were, but despite loving a lot of what’s done with the overworld and really encouraging the player to freely explore the world, the combat and dungeon crawling is absolutely infuriating a lot of the time, and there’s an unfortunate amount of time spent with that stuff, so it ends up making for a game I love conceptually, enjoy about half the time, and feel angry at the other half. Incredibly ambitious for an NES game, and one that gets a ton of things right, but it just becomes annoying by the end and it makes the last couple hours feel especially painful. Ton of respect, but that doesn’t always translate cleanly into how much I enjoyed or appreciated the experience of actually playing through it again.
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Kempokid 2021-06-26T08:24:25Z
2021-06-26T08:24:25Z
3.0
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Great technical game design, but really loses its charm once you figure out all the secrets as it has nothing else really going for it. Worth playing though.
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Michael_Murphy 2022-08-16T15:31:14Z
2022-08-16T15:31:14Z
2.5
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If someone were to argue against Mario’s golden boy status in the echelons of Nintendo’s back catalog in favor of The Legend of Zelda, I would not voice a dissenting opinion against it. It’s telling how much of a monolith Nintendo is in the realm of video games that the two greatest gaming franchises of all time are both their properties. The Mario and Zelda franchises have been dueling for the prestigious status of being Nintendo’s top franchise since the golden years of the NES era. Games from both franchises have been the brightest shining examples on their respective Nintendo consoles. Mario may have more mascot potential and wider general appeal, but there has always been something grander about The Legend of Zelda. When a new Zelda title is released, it feels like a monumental affair. The Mario series is consistently adequate, but we as gamers have always expected much more from Zelda. Every subsequent entry to the Zelda franchise is expected to be the crowning achievement for Nintendo, the pinnacle of gaming for each generation. Considering Zelda’s track record, expecting this for each game is understandable. This standard for Zelda was set incredibly high as early as the first Zelda title on the NES, the only game that can rival the first Super Mario Bros. in terms of influence on the video game medium.

In essence, The Legend of Zelda is the archetypal fantasy story in video game form. All of the elements from the oldest of fantasy tales are present in Zelda such as the hero’s quest, a damsel in distress, a wicked villain from some nether realm, magical aid, swords, and shields, etc. The makeup of Zelda should be familiar to anyone who has even the slightest knowledge of the fantasy genre, regardless of what medium. The key difference is the endearing source of inspiration that separates The Legend of Zelda from its fantasy sources. Shigeru Miyamoto has claimed that the prime inspiration to create The Legend of Zelda was to capture the wondrous sense of adventure he would get galavanting around the woods near his house as a child. I wouldn’t know this feeling because I spent my childhood playing video games (just kidding), but I can use my imagination. It’s the sensation that the world is vast and life has no clear objective. It’s the sense of freedom and appreciation for the beauty of the world that one only has time to explore when they are young. This is the core of The Legend of Zelda with the fantasy makeup and its relatively discernable fantasy quirks as secondary aspects. Old fantasy tropes are most likely what Miyamoto conjured up when he was playing in the woods, and this elevated his experience and sense of excitement.

Nintendo committed to this sense of getting lost in the wonderment of nature by making The Legend of Zelda free-flowing by design. The game begins with a young boy in a green tunic brandishing a small shield in what appears to be a forest setting (or at least from what I can tell from the 8-bit graphics) with no context. People who are at least somewhat familiar with the game know to enter the cave on the beginning screen and talk to the old man to receive the sword, but even this isn’t made very clear. I’d imagine plenty of kids in 1986 venturing off without ever entering the cave, wondering why they are rendered defenseless against all of the enemies. There is absolutely no facilitation when it comes to directing the player through The Legend of Zelda, and that’s the underlying magic of it. Mostly all of the entire map of the game can be explored as soon as the player starts it. The world map is designed like a grid in that each part of it occupies the same rectangular space no matter where the player is. There is also a loading sequence whenever the player enters another space on the grid, a minor foible common in the NES era. With this foible in mind, I’m thoroughly impressed that the developers could render this spacious, non-linear world on an early NES game, so the minute hiccup of loading through each screen is understandable. The lack of concrete direction intertwined with the vastness of the game’s world expertly conveys the feeling of getting lost in a fantasy setting. The world of Zelda consists of marshy plains, craggy mountain paths, deep blue lakes, etc., and is something to be in awe of. Sure, one has to use their imagination a bit due to the 8-bit graphics, but the scope of the world presented here gives it that spectacle. The Legend of Zelda’s world design was something to marvel at.

One could argue that the lack of guidance or assistance on the game’s part gives the game a sense of aimlessness, but that isn’t true. It also doesn’t have to come with negative connotations. Little direction gives the player the incentive to dig through every nook and cranny in Hyrule. There is a secret seemingly in every square inch of the world map. The player can burn bushes with the candle, blow up a wall with a bomb, play the flute in a designated area, etc. to unveil the world’s secrets. It’s always incredibly satisfying to discover something new in this game. The secrets also come with a plethora of rewards. Uncovering these hidden areas will reward the player with extra rupees, shops with special items, a gambling mini-game that can earn the player tons of rupees (or drain them), etc. The most valuable items the player has to search for are the heart containers which increase Link’s maximum health. Heart containers are earned through beating the game’s bosses, but this won’t be enough to unlock the hidden sword upgrades in the recesses of the overworld. This gives the player all the more incentive to scrounge around Hyrule to get the most out of it.

This is when I have to play devil’s advocate. While I greatly appreciate the non-linear direction and lack of stringent progression, the game verges into being cryptic all too often. The secrets are located in very specific places on the map and it would be quite surprising if anyone found these secrets on their own without using a guide. This was even more concerning when this game initially came out due to the lack of resources available to aid the player. I’m convinced the guides in Nintendo Power were created because of The Legend of Zelda. Using a guide sort of diminishes that sense of gratification with exploring, but many of these secrets are much too difficult to find. Most of the items are perks rewarded with exploration, but some items like the bait are found in secret shops. Finding these secrets wouldn’t be too much of a hassle if the player’s bomb inventory was infinite. As it stands, the player only has access to eight bombs, and this number is only increased by four near the end of the game. Attempting to uncover a wall with a secret in it will most likely result in having to pay gobs of money refilling bombs. The game even has the nerve to fine the player a sum of rupees for destroying a wall which is cruel and unusual. This also extends to navigating through the dungeons as progression is often furthered through placing a bomb in the center of a wall. This isn’t nearly as hard to pinpoint due to the enclosed spaces, but I often found myself having to exit the dungeon prematurely to restock on bombs. While we’re on the subject, another unfair aspect of the game is being revived with only three hearts. At the beginning of the game, this isn’t much of an issue because the player might not have more than three to five heart containers, but this becomes an issue as the game progresses. The enemies will most likely obliterate the player soon after being revived, and heart pickups aren’t common enough to be relied on. This makes venturing out to buy potions and or locating a fairy fountain to replenish one’s health after dying in a dungeon just as much of a hassle as restocking on bombs.

Claiming that The Legend of Zelda is a directionless excursion wouldn’t be telling the whole truth. There is still one main objective in this game and it is presented to the player even before the first screen. An evil beast named Ganon has taken a mystical, powerful artifact known as the Triforce of Power. Princess Zelda has scattered the other part of the Triforce, the Triforce of Wisdom, into eight pieces and has scattered them all over Hyrule away from Ganon’s keep. The main objective is to find all eight pieces and then defeat Ganon to gain back the stolen Triforce of Power from him. These eight pieces of the Triforce are kept in eight dungeons, colossal architectures found in eight corners of the Hyrule overworld. Inside each dungeon is a maze of enemies in close corners, hidden switches and passageways, and a foreboding music track that accompanies the player’s trek through each dungeon. While the dungeons may all have the same core objectives, they are all designed differently which in turn makes each one as enjoyable to traverse through. Each of them offers different enemies, different challenges, different routes, etc., providing variety for the player and compensating for the graphical restrictions. My only complaint with the dungeons is that there is a specific order they have to be completed in. Each dungeon is numbered and each subsequent dungeon is more difficult than the next (mostly). The problem here stems from the game’s non-linear world design. The first dungeon is a little more conspicuously located, but it’s common for players to accidentally stumble into a number of the dungeons unknowingly. This makes me wish that the player could complete the dungeons in any order they wanted as I feel it would be more appropriate for the game’s overall direction. Because the dungeons have to be completed in a certain order (made so by the progression of items), it negates the core design of Zelda’s world.

Another disappointing aspect of the dungeons is the bosses. The range of enemy types in The Legend of Zelda are incredibly diverse and make up the foundation of Zelda’s character just as much as the three main players do. Their pack-like nature also adds challenge to the game. The bosses on the other hand are indicative of how early this game was made in the NES library. Boss battles were still in the primitive stages at this point, so many of them were either too simple to defeat or were used continually to pad the game (take the slew of Bowser encounters from Super Mario Bros. for example). The Legend of Zelda is guilty of both of these. Aquamentus is an exciting, yet simple boss as an introduction, but after this there are so many bosses that either die with one precise hit or end up being a gimmick. The only boss that offered a substantial challenge is Gleeok, the only foe that made me feel inclined to utilize the maximum health sword blaster move. Whether the boss is laughably simple or the Gleeok wild card, there are numerous encounters with all of them. Some of them even repeat their role as guardians of a Triforce piece and are just as underwhelming as they were the first time. Even the fight against Ganon, the mighty king of darkness, is a combination of the gimmicky, simple aspects from the previous bosses. The final dungeon is a royal pain in the ass, so I guess I can be relieved that Ganon is relatively stress-free, but it feels so unsatisfying all the same.

I always thought that my relatively positive opinion of the first Legend of Zelda was the same I had for Super Mario Bros. Like the first NES venture with the Italian plumber, its unparalleled influence on the medium of gaming is enough to warrant my respect while I feel lukewarm about the game as a whole due to its primitive qualities. Upon playing the first Legend of Zelda, I enjoyed it much more than I did when I first played it years ago and have gained a newfound appreciation for it that extends beyond a point of respect. The Legend of Zelda is an incredibly ambitious game for an early NES title or any NES title in general. Its open-world design might be a tad askew with progression, but I greatly appreciate that the developers were willing to make the game atypical to convey the feeling of walking through nature. While it isn’t perfect by any means, the developers did the best they could with what they had, and this ambition created a monumental wave of influence that cannot be overlooked. I thoroughly enjoyed my time getting lost in The Legend of Zelda.
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Erockthestrange 2017-07-21T20:08:39Z
2017-07-21T20:08:39Z
7.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
There is something else about The Legend of Zelda that greatly elevates my appreciation of it, and this is something that I’ve always given it credit for. I’m not sure if this is common knowledge, but The Legend of Zelda was the first game with a save feature. It’s shoddily implemented, but it makes a league of difference compared to other early NES games that were still aping arcade machines. The adventure aspects of The Legend of Zelda are still massively influential, but I don’t think gaming would’ve survived without a save feature. It’s something that I certainly appreciate. Because The Legend of Zelda was the first game to incorporate something so monumental, I will forever salute thee.
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The Legend of Zelda appeals in two ways: A charming variation on topdown action-adventure a la Hydlide, and a naive idea of metroidvania. On top of the unique 'tools' - equippable items used to unlock new areas and discover upgrades, its paradigm also relies on gatekeeping areas naturally with strong enemies and obscure solutions, encouraging players to hunt for combat/health upgrades in the meantime. Another strong point is found in the progression itself, which offers a peculiar process of 'mental mapping', of player navigation that gradually spreads outwards from their spawn point as the game advances and - via deaths and backtracking (facilitated by its fixed screens), allows one to memorize the world layout. The general ambiguity is tempered by the occasional hint, but unfortunately falls victim to aimless exploration/experimentation in the second half.

However, caught between the secret hunting and meandering is the great combat, full of enemy nuances that complement its otherwise simple attack and defense options, allowing for several different approaches (of varying efficiency) to encounters. This is especially evident during boss fights - where strategies often utilize clever, offbeat methods, not just pattern recognition. Altogether, these elements produce a fine-tuned system equally adept at action and mystery, that manages to maintain interest throughout the sheer amount of dungeon crawling and map navigating.
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Blah_Blee 2021-06-30T16:29:41Z
2021-06-30T16:29:41Z
7 /10
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Classic, be sure to read the manual when playing
Before anything, if you are planning on playing this, see the link below for the manual, which includes critical information that players were expected to have access to when playing originally. While it may appear strange for crucial information to have been relegated to an external, printed out medium, it is just the design philosophy of the time. In embracing that, I found the game had a charm that modern games don't quite touch. The manual includes a partially filled map that I printed out and manually completed with a pencil, along with notes of shop locations, character hints, and other game secrets. Having part of the exploration require my own willingness to map out the world really increases the involvement you feel in exploring and makes the world feel more mysterious.

Upon playing, it is clear why this game is so influential. The amount of freedom it affords the player is genuinely exciting, if not intimidating. For example, I was able to find the last level far before I was supposed to, though I went and found earlier levels and went for upgrades (save up for the blue ring and find the white sword!) because the difficulty of certain rooms full of enemies can be pretty overwhelming if confronted too early. Later game design philosophy often assumes that giving the player this much freedom from the get-go is poor design because a player could get lost. But because the world itself is relatively well contained and the manual points you in the right direction if needed, the ability to go where you want just adds to the feeling of you being a weak but brave adventurer confronting an actually dangerous world.

As a Zelda series fan, it is also fun to see how this influenced later games. While open exploration defines most of the game, it also features some some one-off progression blocks that require a specific solution (e.g. how do you get past an enemy that just says, "grumble, grumble"). It is reminiscent of design adopted in later games like Ocarina of Time (e.g. how on earth do you get into Jabu Jabu's belly?) that requires some listening to characters (or manual hints) and applying real world logic. Other series staples are introduced here, including musical instruments for transportation, lost woods, hidden secrets behind walls, using items found in dungeons to conquer enemies, etc.

Really, the main problem with this game just comes from its controls and combat, which are mildly horrendous. By the time the game ends, you get pretty good at moving around enemies, but the short little stab combined with no diagonal movement can make for some very annoying battles in some later levels. This is particularly the case when enemies like wizzrobes can warp directly in front of you with no warning while 4 fireballs are firing at you and 5 other enemies are semi-randomly marching all around you. Since the bulk of the challenge of the levels comes from combat, this obviously hurts the game if you don't love the combat. Some of the level challenge comes from navigation, but it is relatively simple, and mostly comes down to being willing to bomb enough walls. I fully admit i used the Nintendo Switch version which allows for small rewinding of events, so if I bombed a wall and it didn't reveal a new room, I would just rewind and get my bomb back. This obviously circumvented most of the inventory management aspect of the game, which is another source of difficulty, but since I didn't enjoy the combat aspect necessary for farming resources, I happily used modern emulator features to skip that portion. Judge me as you will.

Overall, I consider this game to be wonderful in the macro aspects of world exploration, interpreting secrets, and figuring out where to go next. But the micro aspects of actual combat and movement controls are very rigid and not particularly fun. But the power of those macro aspects make this a very enjoyable experience, especially in contrast to the modern gaming landscape. I highly recommend this if you're curious about Zelda's roots, or adventure gaming in general.
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mr_neffets 2021-07-06T23:04:33Z
2021-07-06T23:04:33Z
3.5
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Catalog

SufferBombDisease ゼルダの伝説 2022-10-03T01:28:24Z
2022-10-03T01:28:24Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
fellebanan_ygsr ゼルダの伝説 2022-10-02T20:40:26Z
2022-10-02T20:40:26Z
3.0
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
romulavgust ゼルダの伝説 2022-10-01T19:01:04Z
2022-10-01T19:01:04Z
2.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
shrubman ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-27T14:56:06Z
2022-09-27T14:56:06Z
2.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
bamhulu ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-25T03:01:16Z
2022-09-25T03:01:16Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
>=2019
Subcon_Onirico ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-24T10:14:05Z
2022-09-24T10:14:05Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Cbchico9 ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-22T23:14:38Z
2022-09-22T23:14:38Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
anderd0504 The Legend of Zelda 2022-09-19T21:17:07Z
Switch
2022-09-19T21:17:07Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
fr13nd_luv ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-16T16:03:41Z
2022-09-16T16:03:41Z
4.0
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BeardedCivilizer ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-15T17:45:11Z
2022-09-15T17:45:11Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
DietChalamet ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-15T02:17:51Z
2022-09-15T02:17:51Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
MirM ゼルダの伝説 2022-09-14T06:47:21Z
2022-09-14T06:47:21Z
3.0
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  • The Legend of Zelda
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  • Previous comments (4) Loading...
  • Marcepam_ 2021-05-10 20:18:04.081243+00
    best thing ever
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  • elGigante 2021-07-26 00:56:49.099867+00
    playing this in 2021 on an emulator doesn't even begin to do justice to sitting on the floor with your friends in front of a tv, drawing maps on loose-leaf paper for hours and making notes of dungeons and items all night long. If you have child-like imagination and lust for adventure, there's really not much else like this game (especially in 1986, holy shit)
    reply
    • mcalphax 2021-08-21 18:28:16.036042+00
      i wish i could experience this
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  • UnmistakableRin 2021-08-30 09:30:54.291807+00
    That last dungeon was the worst.
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  • Myriadis 2021-10-08 08:18:07.231851+00
    Probably my favorite 2D Zelda. The harsher difficulty really required you to delevop strategies and the dungeons are built in a way that you need to be careful to get through it. Only ZeldaClassic Fangames get close to that
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  • anderd0504 2022-02-01 07:41:19.93881+00
    finally playing this by making my own hand-drawn map and wow, it's so much more fun like this
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  • Jaxijin 2022-04-05 22:27:59.792091+00
    Shocked at how much I enjoyed this game considering its age. There wasn't as much NES bullshit difficulty as I was expecting (the wizzrobes are like the original gank squad and they singlehandedly made me despise level 6 ha), which is something considering I found The Mysterious Murasame Castle, released the same year using the same engine, to be brutally unplayable without save states.
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  • AzulaFantasia 2022-04-27 05:19:58.969191+00
    It's The Legend of Zelda and it's really rad
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  • Molten_ 2022-05-25 06:13:58.738673+00
    honestly the only flaw with this game, is how link can't move diagonally. makes combat really annoying, especially in later dungeons where you're avoiding a room full of enemies and projectiles. people who complain about bombing random walls and burning random bushes are missing the point, the game is supposed to feel like a world where a secret can exist under any tile. that's the magic of it.
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