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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

Developer: FromSoftware Publishers: ActivisionFromSoftwareCubeGame [方块游戏]
22 March 2019
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice - cover art
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2,752 Ratings / 6 Reviews
#20 All-time
#3 for 2019
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2019 From Activision  
Blu-ray
CA 0 47875 88293 5 CUSA-12047
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2019 From Activision  
Blu-ray
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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Edición juego del año
2020 From Activision  
Blu-ray
ES 5 030917 250408 CUSA-13801
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Game of the Year Edition
2020 From Activision  
Blu-ray
XNA 0 47875 88292 8 CUSA-12047
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Title
Sekiro succeeds where it matters most, but...
It fails to fit together and is ultimately less than the sum of its parts. It prioritizes wrote memorization and reaction time over player choice and level design. It is a game that, on paper, I should really enjoy. I'm a fan of stealth games and flashy sword fights. I like vertical level design and cool movement mechanics (especially grappling hooks). Unfortunately, the only part of this equation that Sekiro manages to deliver is the sword fights.

When the combat clicks, it feels good. The timing on deflecting is fairly precise, but rewards you with opportunities to deal damage to your opponent. Your attacks have pretty long animations that punish greed, but most opponents have equally long telegraphs. The game is easily at its worst then it throws a horde of enemies at you, especially if they are grouped with a mini-boss or larger threat. The swordplay is designed for 1v1 combat and never feels comfortable outside of that. You can easily get hit multiple times during a stumble animation and get stun-locked to death and the camera's lock-on system still thinks it's 1998. Fortunately, the delicate balance of trading blows with a solo enemy is capable of putting the player in a "flow state" and the presentation of the fights is beautiful. The sound of swords clashing is crisp and visceral and the visuals are clear and dramatic. There is a lot of depth to the swordplay and every major enemy will test you somehow. As a result the game never truly "gets easier." Some bosses test your deflection skills, some test your movement skills through sweeps or grabs, and some will require you to apply constant pressure. They stretched the combat system as far as they feasible could, and you will most likely die several dozen times on the major bosses before you get a good fight in. To some, engaging with that system and coming out on top is a rush. It provides the satisfaction of conquering a challenge. To me, it was like studying for a test and passing only for the satisfaction to be cut short by the realization that there's another test next week. And, just like in school, there was a series of questionable busywork tasks between every boss.

This is where things really fall apart for Sekiro. The game's sword combat is engaging, but everything supporting it is absolutely not. The rest of the game ranges from questionable to outright poor. The stealth is bare bones, the level design is simplistic, the movement through the environment feels uninspired, and the rewards for exploration are sparse. The big cherry on this shameful sundae is the prosthetic tools, which solidified something I felt during all of my time with the game: there is almost no player agency.

Stealth games are a rare breed, especially in the modern AAA landscape, because they require a lot of attention to detail. Sekiro is a game that knows what Stealth level design looks like, but not what mechanics make it interesting. There is little incentive to be stealthy as you navigate through the world and the biggest benefit it will give you is an advantage at the start of a fight. However, killing enemies is the only way you can acquire EXP to unlock new skills and one of the main ways to acquire currency. While currency doesn't do you a lot of good, EXP certainly will. Any reasonable player will want every advantage they can get, and engaging with the stealth system beyond silent takedowns will not help you unlock anything. The game's progression system is at odds with one of its supplementary mechanics instead of synergizing with it. This is made harder to overlook by how malnourished the Stealth actually is: enemies don't react to noise, their line of sight is suspiciously narrow, and they won't react to finding the corpse of one of their buddies on the ground. The sound design I praised the sword fighting for is absent here as well. The enemies also don't know how to look up, a fact that is made obvious by the level design and the movement system.

Getting on a roof makes it harder for enemies to spot you and gives you access to drop kills, but the aforementioned enemy AI and the linear world design betrays the verticality of the levels. Enemies with poor vision are placed along linear pathways, rarely creating interesting challenges or situations for the player to overcome. When the game does open up and provide an additional path or two, your reward for exploration is either optional boss fights (a sometimes frustrating reward) or a collection of consumables. Sometimes the game mandates that you use certain consumables, like the Divine Confetti, to take on certain enemies. This gives some of the consumables inherent value, but also means you might have to grind for them. You might find prayer beads that can be used to increase your stats, but this is an exception and not the rule. If the progression system didn't force the player into combat, it would be incredibly easy to run along the rooftops and clear each area unnoticed in mere seconds unless you are funneled through a cavern or ravine. This can be a benefit when you're grinding away at a boss, but otherwise shows just how little thought went into these environments. There was never a moment that I saw a pathway or a courtyard and thought "how am I going to get through here unseen?" because the answer usually came in the form of a grappling hook prompt. And that's where Sekiro commits its greatest sin of all: the grappling hook is not fun to use.

The basic movement of Sekiro feels fine and is well animated. The prosthetic arm's grappling hook, however, is a missed opportunity. It's implemented into the combat well, of course, but navigating levels and rooftops with it is a glorified quick time event. It fails to understand the appeal of a system like this in the same way the Thief reboot does: giving players a specific "grappling point" is boring. A device like this, which should ideally provide freeform movement and exploration, is instead a "click to move here" button with impressive animations. The player is being given a guided tour by the developers. Every grappling hook point is placed precisely to reveal a pathway through the level or a good vantage point. It never feels like an organic part of the game's design.

This lack of player agency extends to the prosthetic tools in general, which tend to lean towards "hard counters" instead of tools to spark player creativity. You cannot combine the effects of multiple prosthetic tools and they typically have preset, scripted interactions with enemies. The axe is useful for posture damage and breaking shields, the flame vent is useful against enemies doused in oil and enemies with red eyes, and the shuriken is useful for attracting enemies from a distance or countering weak ranged enemies without a means of deflecting attacks. These are the game's earliest tools and set the tone for the rest of what you'll find in the game. There are a handful of exceptions, such as the firecracker and the umbrella, which can be applied in a wide variety of encounters. This is intentional design, I'm sure, because the game's first major filter (Chained Ogre) teaches you this lesson directly. What could have been a way to tailor a playstyle for yourself instead becomes a sort of "meta game" where experimenting with your tools can sometimes give you an easy win for an encounter. The fact that every boss' wiki article has a "weaknesses" category with one or two prosthetics illustrates this point. While the game doesn't hold your hand, once you know what to use to get an advantage you have zero incentive to experiment further on that boss or enemy type. In addition, the prosthetics all draw from limited pool of ammo that you have to buy. If you get stuck on a boss, you might end up having to grind for more Spirit Emblems. This is just needless padding as far as I'm concerned. Why not refill your Spirit Emblems when you rest or respawn? The prosthetic upgrade tree rarely felt impactful, although some of the upgrades continue the "hard counter to an enemy" trend mentioned above. For instance, acquiring the Lilac Umbrella trivializes the Shichimen Warrior mini-boss. While most of the prosthetics have a variety of uses there is almost always a "correct" answer when choosing what you want to have equipped for an enemy or encounter, leaving little room for player creativity.

To me, this is the greatest sin the game commits: it does not want you to develop a playstyle for yourself or to experiment with a pool of mechanics. You aren't allowed to explore for better gear or new tools and come back later. The most important part of the game's progression system is gated by the boss fights. It wants you to "git gud" at it's carefully designed sword fights and doesn't give you any other options or flexibility. Nothing outside of those sword fights was given any passionate consideration or depth. You have no agency here- you either learn to play exactly how the game wants you to or you die. Even if you like the combat, that's kind of a shame.

The story is probably the best part of this game, and the combat animations are a huge part of that storytelling. The game has a strong character focus, unlike the rest of From's modern catalog, but still has interesting things to say about immortality, violence, and how Buddhism relates to both of those things. The characters speak the language of violence, and the ways they fight can tell you a lot about who they are as people. There are some other interesting ideas, such as the monks who turn their back on their teachings in pursuit of immortality. Despite the total disregard for their ideals, you can see how they might have come to the conclusion that immortality was a way to escape Saṃsāra. This explains why they do the atrocious things they do and also reinforces the goals of the player character: put an end to the pursuit of immortality entirely to prevent its inevitable abuse.

I have tried to evaluate Sekiro on its own merits here. As soon as I started comparing it to shining beacons of emergent gameplay and player agency like Deus Ex, Dishonored, Vampires: The Masquerade - Bloodlines, or Cruelty Squad the game's cracks became even more obvious. More damning than any of these comparisons, however, is that FromSoft's other successful games don't have this problem. Janky as they might be, the Dark Souls series champions player freedom through its metroidvania-like level design and RPG mechanics. That quality is what makes the Soulsborne games, and the other ones mentioned above, so special. It is what sets video games apart from other artistic mediums. In comparison Sekiro just feels... lame and hollow. Coincidentally, that is exactly how I felt every time I closed the game.
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MisterSynthesizer 2022-09-06T19:20:35Z
2022-09-06T19:20:35Z
2.0
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inaccessible anime flashy combat pain written review good narrative grappling hook reactive narrative
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A singular vision, polished beyond belief
Sekiro is a game with a very singular vision which, depending on the person you ask, is either its greatest strength or its greatest flaw. Most people at hearing there is only 'one way' to play a game would think negatively of such a restraint on the player's freedom. If you ask me though, this 'one way' in Sekiro is one of the best experiences I've ever had in gaming and it fucking rules

In Sekiro, your protagonist has a very simple list of actions - attack, parry, block, jump and dodge (yes there's also your prosthetic arm that can be changed willy nilly into a variety of specific usage/niche gadgets but be quiet). As there are so few actions available to the player, as well as bugger all in the way of gear and weapons, designing and balancing the entire game's enemies and boss fights becomes significantly easier - you can't cheese these dudes with one-shot magic blasts or any variety of ez weapon/armor builds like what is generally possible in the other Souls games, you just have to be fucking good. Sure you can level up and unlock a few new moves, but in terms of stat upgrades you only unlock them after you beat a boss and it's kind of like the game saying "lol you don't deserve this shit until you beat this brother bloody" and means you can't grind brainless mobs and get over-leveled

Sekiro is also one of the few games that I felt had no next to no jank or bugs whatsoever which is becoming a rarity these days bless FromSoft - from start to finish it runs, plays and looks like a dream. Its such a tight and razor sharp game, I find it difficult to fault on a technical level and I'd like to point out just how much I enjoy its sound design as well. Each one of those actions I mentioned earlier sound exactly as they should, especially the block and parry sound with how vital they are to the gameplay. You just fucking know that the parry is the more satisfying one to your ears as it's the one the game wants you to perform and you'll soon curse yourself every time you hear that slightly depressing sound of blocking

What I enjoy most about this game is how much it makes me want to be good at the game because of how fucking good it feels to be good like fr. Pretty much every enemy you encounter, you don't just want to defeat them you want to fuck their shit up with no hits and perfect parries all the way through and the visual and audio feedback you get when you do fuck them up makes it soo worth it - like its one of the only games I've played in recent memory that I may run back with like mods and all that because its insane how right that combat feels. It doesn't need any sort of score/combo meter/ranking system to motivate me, its just that solid

And this is allll capped off with some of the most based pieces of game design in an action game - the posture meter and the deathblow. In Sekiro you don't really give a fuck about the health bar of the bosses, it's the 'posture' bar you got to worry about as filling this up by attacking and parrying their attacks in quick enough succession is usually the best (and coolest) way to put them down. The best thing about the posture bar is, unlike a typical health bar, it slowly moves back to its original state which signifies that you must keep pressuring your opponent whether it be with attacking or perfect parrying their attacks, there is no time to be a defensive diva and chip away at their health because that shit don't work here brother and it keeps the fight tense the entire time. Its a fantastic way to build this growing tension as you get closer and closer to ending the fight and this is where the deathblow comes in to release all of it in the most gratifying way possible. The big red circle that appears on the enemy, the loud af audio cue and the brutal execution that follows feels so much more rewarding then in other games where a light tap could be what spells the demise of the boss before instantly cutting to a pre-rendered cutscene. Its like the game's way of rewarding all your hard work struggling thru this boss, who you likely would have died to quite a lot, encapsulated by this one mechanic and made possible by the one that precedes it

This game was FromSoftware's biggest departure from their usual formula and is an extremely exciting step for whatever new branch of the genre they created that they decide to do next, god I want a sequel but I won't be mad if this is a one off kinda thing

Other shit
- the destined dragon boss fight, isshin, lady butterfly, genichiro, the ape - soooo many goated boss fights that you can actually imagine being done with no hits whatsoever, and the posture meter lets you off them in no time at all if you're good enough
- Demon of hatred is actual stupid tho
- the few times you get to motherfucking deflect lightning are too few but holy fuck if it's not one of the most satisfying things you can do in a video game like bro I just shot the lightning you threw at me with my sword
- I underutilized the fuck out of prosthetics if i ever play it again i should fuck around with them more they seem really cool
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Brownie213 2024-02-01T08:45:04Z
2024-02-01T08:45:04Z
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How A Game I Hated Became My Favorite
Sekiro is a gaming experience like none other. For so long, I've always looked for the easy way out in games cheesing for shortcuts, and this contained some cheeses for sure, but at some point, this game looks me in the eye and goes "Fuck that cheese. Either you're going to learn how to play to win, or lose", and I definitely lost more times than I could count. No game has done me like that before. If there were ever a chance I kept losing, no problem, I'm simply adjusting the difficulty level to the easiest mode because I'm going to win. Once I win, then maybe I'll try the hard mode for a challenge. Sekiro is not of one of those games.

Most games give you the explorer option. They walk you through every step while giving you highly detailed guides and tips for you to enjoy and have fun. Then, once you master everything, you can level up and try the highest difficulty available. Not this game. There is no level of difficulty you can choose from. Sekiro is stuck on hard mode. If you can beat it (IF you can beat it), you can keep all your items you maxed out and do a 2nd playthrough making it easier since now you understand the game. What video game does that?

This is my first FromSoftware game. Actually, this is also my first "soulslike" game. Before Sekiro, I didn't even know what FromSoftware was. I had zero clue how HUGE their fanbase was. I didn't even know Bloodborne, Demon Souls, or Dark Souls existed until I searched to see who developed this game. Had I known, I would not have gotten this game because I did not care to experience hard and challenging games. The type of video games I've been accustomed to were popular franchises such as Uncharted, GTA, NBA2K, WWE games, and Call Of Duty. Super casual right? So, why would a casual like me buy this game?

Among those five games I listed, Ghost of Tsushima is also one of my favorite games of all time. Watching shows and movies like Samurai Jack or Afro Samurai, I've always wanted video games that could capture that fighting essence and style portrayed. I'm pretty much a sucker when it comes to samurai/ninja fighting content from anime to gaming combat. So, I saw the trailer of Sekiro online and was immediately reeled in. I knew I was going to get this game someday, and I did.

Once I began to play Sekiro, the biggest highlight for me was the anime inspired graphics. Although the inspiration is greatly pulled from Berserk, It reminded me a lot of the 90's anime film Ninja Scroll ---the way the environments would look so dirty, foggy, and grimy. Little details such as the watcher banging his pan, the style of dialogue spoken while eavesdropping, the fast paced combat, or the "woo guy" flying in kamikaze style are just a few examples displaying the essence of some of my favorite anime. Along with the anime visuals, the biggest draw of this game has to be the challenge of the combat.

The combat here is so special and unique because you can't always just mow through your opponent using your favorite move or special weapons. Prior to playing Sekiro, I never had to worry about actually studying the bosses' move sets in games because I knew that one super move I had would always do the trick and get me the win. In Ghost Of Tsushima, when you face a boss, the best thing to do is see how their going to swing, then either parry that or dodge, then boom, you can use your ghost super power moves bringing their health very low. In God Of War games, you can use that Rage Mode any time for Kratos to defeat his enemies. You can't do that here. While a game like Ghost of Tsushima or God Of War's offense brings alot of damage, Sekiro relies more on the defensive side. In Sekiro, the best thing to do is see how their going to swing, then either deflect that, dodge, mikiri counter, then boom, swing in a hit or two then get right back to deflecting and repeat. Some say it's like a dance. Except in this dance, you better have a perfect deflection (parry). The first phase of a boss may have the rhythm of 1-2-3, hit, 1-2-3, hit and turn into 1-2, hit, 1-2-3-4-5, hit, hit, hit, firecrackers, hit, REPEAT 3-5 more times while looking out for mikiri counters, then deathblow. If you ask me now, I love everything about this combat, but if you asked me during my first playthrough, I would've told you I hated everything about it.

So, how does such an awesome looking anime ninja sword fighting game turn me from watching trailers and gameplays in utter amazement into typing google searches such as "How to return digital copy of PSN game?", "Is there an easy mode in Sekiro?", and "Why is Sekiro so hard?". I bought this game blindly off the strength of the appeal in ninja sword fighting. Never knew how difficult this game would be. This is really the first game that I actually had to sit down and strategize every move of my opponent. Most video games I've encountered, there would be 3 moves max that would mess me up, but I could easily anticipate what their next move would be. In Sekiro, those 3 moves turn into 6-9 with mini moves that could easily wreck your health if you're not fully engaged. Safe to say my first playthrough was just not a fun casual experience.

I just couldn't fathom a video game that I liked being so hard to the point where it felt like it was no longer enjoyable. So, I went to the internet hoping someone coped or if anybody was struggling with this game the way I was, and there were a chunk ton of people just like me either complaining or questioning the reasons to why this game is so challenging and difficult to grasp, and the only insightful responses I saw were "Git gud", "Git gud", "Git gud", "Git gud", and "Git gud".

I'm stuck with two options at this point: either just play another game or get good and find a way to win. So, I chose the former, and that didn't last long. Usually, when I'm done with a game, it's because it's boring or I just didn't gravitate towards it. The dilemma with Sekiro is it's far from boring. I've never encountered a game I enjoy but found too hard. This is a huge first for me. No matter how many times I tried to erase this game from my console or my mind, I just kept coming back to it because it's the game I've always wanted to play but boy is it hard. In my first playthrough, I just couldn't grasp the difference between blocking and deflection timing. The timing of mikiri counters was so frustrating to understand because I didn't know whether to press the button once the sound effect hit or when my opponent's sword would be raised up to strike. This hit frustratingly hard once I came across the ninjas, samurai mini-bosses, shinobi hunter, and the monk bosses. The counter system of this game didn't make sense until I searched online and saw someone say "Mikiri counter once you see the gleam of the sword flash".

There are things I love about this game, but there are definitely things I hate. For starters, the camera is at the very top of what I despise. I have died or been hit too many times all due to this choice of camera angle in fights. Its a nightmare whenever your opponent jumps and vanishes or when you get cornered and mercilessly attacked (hello Owl, Lady Butterfly, Isshin, and Ape). The movement of the character can feel dreadful. The jumping and speed of the running feels slightly wonky. It's not really wonky, but it's far from smooth. Even the swinging of the sword makes the strike of it feel cheap sometimes. This game not helping to communicate a crystal clear objective can really make you feel lost not knowing what your next step should be. It reminds me so much of old PS2 games. You know the ones where they just drop you off in a level and you have to eavesdrop for clues just to figure out where to go or you're stuck in that one room and did not know to jump out the window that's right behind that box you have to shoot two times (dammit max payne). Thank God for Youtube. Lastly, Death is something I abhor on this game. Not losing or dying in itself. That's a learning challenge, but what happens after is so annoying. It's annoying to lose either half or all your coins, emblems, and items gained after dying as well as having to start everything over. Like could we at least get an autosave after beating a phase or not have to fight the previous boss I just beat to get back at the final boss? No? Git gud? Alright.

There are certainly bosses and mini-bosses I’ve enjoyed beating but certainly been annoyed with fighting at the same time. I enjoyed understanding their pattern and finding a way to beat them, but so annoyed by getting beaten over and over again even after learning their moves. First off, the Chained Ogre completely threw me off. Imagine being a student in Math class consistently taught to do this one math equation over and over again, but on the first test, it doesn't even show up. That's what this boss is. No mikiri counters. No jumping sweep attacks. Just strike, dodge, strike 2 times, and oh fire crackers or fire vent, but would I know all this at all?? No, of course not. I got Batista bombed, elbow dropped, and dropkicked about 40 times by this enraged Kevin Nash. Truly, The first of many bosses that made me regret buying this game.

The next boss I struggled with (I laugh now after beating this guy again) was Gyoubu Masataka Oniwa. I knew there was going to be a boss once I walked on that field. I just struggled with the snake , so I didn't expect another one so soon, but I could feel how tense the silence was right after either killing those soldiers behind the wall. Ignorantly but fearfully walking into this field of dead bodies, burnt debris, and fire, I hear one of the most ferocious battle cries ever yelled in a video game: "MY NAAAAAAAME IS GYOUBU MASATAKA ONIWA!!". That alone is one of the main reasons the English dub is surprisingly just as good as the Japanese delivered in this game. But man, I have heard "The castle gate remains closed” too many times. Whether it's the terror-filled Headless and Shichmen Warriors or the fart pootin poop flinging Guardian Ape and his girlfriend, this game has managed to create some of the most infuriating bosses I have ever played against. Yet, there still remains some uniquely designed creativity in nearly all of the bosses presented even amongst the ones I hate.

Genichiro made me uninstall this game. Several times in fact on this boss alone. He's the Steph Curry of this game. This man shoots from long range with arrows in a game that focuses on close-combat sword battles. I despise him so much, but I would be a liar if I didn't admit that this is the first boss that taught me how to play the game. No cheesing. No easy way out. Perfect parries, deflect, mikiri counters, jumping sweep attacks, and lightning reversals are all in this battle. To beat him, you must actually learn, and once I beat him, I was more motivated to continue playing the game.

The next boss that I hate but must respect is Owl . The Lebron James of this game. The man is a complete unit. A tank with sword swings that can break your posture in 2 hits, but he has every trick up his sleeve. We use firecrackers, umbrellas, healing gourds, shurikens, etc.; but to face a boss that does the same tricks as you is so annoying. Owl made me regret protecting Kuro. It did. I was just staring at the screen thinking "damn I should've turned evil". What I hate the most about this boss is I learned all his moves. I understood each turn and weapon he was going to use on me, but this one running sword maneuver would always mess me up. I would never know whether to parry or just dodge and get the hell out of there. Took me 15-20 tries to beat him, and yes I uninstalled this game a few times fighting him. And to make it even more challenging, they add a higher version of this guy. Truthfully, Father Owl has everything to be ranked as the best boss in this game but Glock Saint just goes way harder.

Lastly, the hardest boss I have ever faced in video games is hands down Isshin The Sword Saint . I'm done with the basketball comparisons, but Isshin is The Michael Jordan of this game. Everyone says that eventually you're going to encounter a boss in this game that will make it all click for you. I don't know why, but it clicked for me playing Isshin . Genichiro helped me understand the basics of the game better, but Isshin helped me understand what I should have been doing from the beginning. I finally understood the difference between perfect parrying and just blocking. I can't believe I was getting by just blocking and getting lucky with the deflections. It's really one of those bosses that frustrate you to the point where you can't fathom or believe you actually beat him once you do. Took me 20 times just to get phase 1 beat. Then, I Mastered phase 1, but the 2nd phase hit, and I got my ass beat so bad. I understand the spears but a gun?? Seriously??? Not to mention how that 6 hit combo move would always fuck me up. I'm parrying hard for that mikiri counter just for my posture to be broken. Then the 3rd phase hit.. Ok, so you're telling me I have to look out for all his moves with a sword alone plus the spears and a GUN... now you add LIGHTNING to the mix? Goodness gracious. To beat all those moves after getting beat 60 times gave me the sweetest feeling of bliss I've ever received from a game. I don't care what anyone says. Isshin The Sword Saint is the Boss of all bosses.

Overall, I can't believe this is one of my favorite games now. Like, I really despised the core and very being of this game too many times to count as I kept getting beat. I kept uninstalling this game at least 9 or 10 times. I even hid it from the purchased section in my library. I was actually googling "How to get refund from downloaded game?". I have never encountered a game this hard. If there's one thing I learned about myself during this process, it's that I'm not a rage quitter. I'm not slinging controllers at tv's and stuff. No, that's juvenile. I will take a slow deep breath, mumble one cuss word, then convince myself it's just a game, uninstall, wait a few hours or even a day, then install it back to try again. But, this is why Sekiro is so good. I couldn't scratch that itch. I uninstalled this game more than several times, but every time I tried to erase the mere thought of ever purchasing this game, it kept reeling me in. I struggled so much for hours with Isshin the Sword Saint that I convinced myself that Genichiro was the final boss and I won just so I could delete the game. I never felt such a feeling of relief and exhilaration ever in a video game before once I saw that red dot of death hovering over the chest of my broken opponent.

For gamers that's on the fence about getting the game or not, GET IT. It's so worth it. The thrill and adrenaline from beating the bosses on this game makes it a very special experience. Some of the bosses can be very intimidating especially the ones with faster paced methods of combat, but once you see the pattern, its not that scary. Be aggressive but smart in how you attack. If there's one thing about this game, unless you are fighting Mist Noble , you can’t spam attack like you’re in easy mode. Creating a rhythm or combo is going to be essential here. Once you get the game, remember, you are a shinobi. A NINJA. Not a samurai or a knight. So choose your battles wisely. You don't have to fight 4 enemies at once and go to war. It's okay to run and hide and pick one off by another if you want. Or maybe you want to fight 4 or 5 at a time. Either way, just enjoy yourself. Also, don't be afraid to take breaks. Whether that's a 10 minute water break, 2 hour break, or even 3 day break from the game. Personally, I've taken breaks from battles I just couldn't beat and noticed that I'm 2 times better and more focused than I was before once I returned. This game can be brutal, but it can also be beautiful. The very thing that makes you hate this game will make you love it.
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TheHonorableMinisterBBG 2022-10-03T06:03:47Z
2022-10-03T06:03:47Z
5.0
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The similarities that Sekiro bears when compared to the other modern Fromsoftware games are largely extremely overstated and feel as if a lot of the comparisons only exist because they all happen to be difficult and they come from the same company. This is definitely not a bad thing however, because as a result, Sekiro manages to both have the sort of quality you'd expect from the company, but is also an insanely fresh take on the idea of this style of game that it retroactively makes me think that Elden Ring might've been a slightly larger mechanical step back than I initially realised. You've got your similarities for sure, with the UI and the generally dark, mysterious tone/atmosphere and the slightly janky charm of it all, but beyond that there's not really too much I can say that feels similar here that couldn't also be attributed as incredibly broad stroke design ideas that don't deserve to be associated exclusively with the Souls series in the first place. On the flipside, the completely fresh combat system, greater sense of mobility and the cohesive, evocative landscapes of feudal Japan all help the game carve out a wonderfully distinct identity from the pack. With all this said, it's obviously not enough to just be different, you need to be good as well otherwise it's all for naught, so it's fortunate that this is easily the most polished and complete experience of them all as well.

While often I find that games tend to get a lot of their appeal from a variety of sources that all culminate in something greater than the sum of their parts, Sekiro really isn't that sort of game to me (though that's not to say that the game is especially lacking in any particular area). This game propels itself into utter greatness through having one of the greatest combat systems in any game I've experienced and it's not even particularly close. While utterly relentless through and through, having some incredibly fast pace for a game that will gleefully kill you in two or three hits in quick succession, the moveset the player has this fantastic balance between more casual friendly strategies but with the potential for utter mastery always being something that presents itself. The range of tools that the player has at their disposal will likely allow them to get one over nasty encounters without entirely trivialising them either, providing a way to ease the player more gracefully into the game while still being a messy, desperate fight for the chance to survive. This is not just because of the use of these tools being limited either, but because of the way the combat at its core affects the dynamics of the game.

Despite providing the player with easily the most mobility out of any Fromsoft title, Sekiro is funnily enough the game that punishes hesitation the most. While you can certainly run fast, quicker burst movement options are incredibly limited to the point where they're borderline worthless for general use, instead being used nearly exclusively as a tool for slightly better positioning. This makes actually being able to take that final step to properly be clashing swords with your foe a risky one, as the enemies are likely going to be able to hit you once before you're actually properly positioned to get back to fighting. This encourages a more aggressive, close up playstyle due to this constant looming punishment where you're likely to either need to take a hit or risk one additional attack for the sole purpose of closing the gap. Similarly, while almost every other one of your moves almost instantly comes out, the slight delay on your jump stops it from being an entirely dominant strategy where you're winning your fights by hopping around like a madman, making it pretty situationally useful as well. The trick to this game's genius partially lies within these dynamics however, there's almost never an option that feels universally powerful, it's almost all situational, but there are so many situational mechanics that the player will never find themselves in a situation that they couldn't have avoided if they just read the battle a bit better. This crafts a combat system that requires absolute constant attention towards the flow of battle to better understand when they'll have to utilise these additional techniques on top of their constant sword strikes, where you're almost never able to mindlessly approach even weaker enemies, as a couple of mistakes in a row can easily lead to your death. Never have I played a game that required such a constant keen awareness of what the player is expected to do, and it essentially makes the fights against basic opponents a bit of an adrenaline rush combined with extremely visceral sound and visual feedback.

The posture system is yet another element that encourages the player to be up in the faces of their enemies, being a far more significant element to keep in mind than even the enemy's health bar, which often acts more as a complementary element to posture rather than what the player is aiming to deplete. The game bases itself less around dodging, and more around judging what attacks you're able to parry and then doing that at every opportunity. Each hit against the enemy, blocked or not, brings you ever so slightly closer to instantly killing them, the constant attacks forcing enemies to play more defensively and counter attack instead, often being more predictable than letting them run free and put you on the backfoot. The way this often quickly heals when you give the enemy a chance to breathe is simply the final element that brings everything together, a moment of passivity can easily lead to your doom, so jumping right into the fire and facing even the most powerful single targets head on ends up being the way you're expected to play, with slowly chipping away at their often huge health bars being a far slower and ultimately more dangerous method due to the previous elements mentioned with being severely punished for being on the backfoot in most situations. Tying health to this posture regeneration is another element that adds a bit more of a dynamic flow to the fight and stops the player from simply relying on a single sense of rhythm against their enemies for the most part either however, as while sure, if you play perfectly you could win by attacking nonstop and perfectly parrying literally everything, but the more reliable strategy is to find those more glaring weaknesses in your opponent and exploit them, being able to chip away while never having to resort to hit and run tactics.

Against a single target, I cannot think of a game that has combat quite as thrilling and satisfying to master as Sekiro, but the issue is that the moment you add even one more enemy into the fray, everything falls apart a bit due to the fact that this was so clearly built around only a single target and situationally dealing with all of their carefully constructed moveset. The lack of more generalised "good" options ends up forcing the player either to use some of their limited resources to deal with them, or to resort to tactics that the game mechanically discourages you from utilising , to the point where it often feels more worth it to simply run away and not engage at all. While the situations where you're forced into these outnumbering encounters are rather rare, often being situations where you're instead expected to utilise stealth to take them out one by one, even those few situations where you end up needing to deal head on with multiple enemies are consistently frustrating and miserable. This isn't really a dealbreaker because of these situations being infrequent enough but I cannot stress enough how angry these have consistently made me feel.

Another thing that's interesting to keep in mind is the design ramifications that result from the total lack of build variety this game has ultimately making for a far more fine tuned experience, with each moveset being able to be crafted around the idea of a fast katana user and only a fast katana user, stopping the need for more generic, broadly sweeping moves that are designed around being manageable from an insane amount of possibilities. The biggest thing this ends up doing is leading to a situation where there's basically no such thing as a mindless trash mob, they all will have their own slightly different strategies that need to be utilised to get out on top. Beyond the combat, I feel that while the areas are usually not especially mechanically interesting to explore beyond some neat, clever enemy placement, the atmosphere and imagery is evocative enough for me to really not care all that much about this, as walking through and taking in the breathtaking sights is sometimes enough, especially when it's very clear that this game wants to spend as much time evolving the combat as possible rather than the more balanced nature of these elements in Dark Souls and the like. I also feel that I'm not entirely happy with how punishing death feels in this, especially considering this is easily the hardest and most demanding game I've played by these guys. Halving your currency on death with a small chance of no repercussions like that simply doesn't feel good and just leads to endless death spirals feeling more demoralising than ever before.

The game on top of all this, manages to have a nearly perfect line up of bosses, deftly balancing between more direct fights and those that completely shake up the formula in far more interesting ways than one might expect. The enemies that feel specifically designed around acting against the core combat and forcing you to use more unconventional strategies manage to make you feel sufficiently disadvantaged without feeling outright stupid or unfair, and the puzzle/gimmick fights almost feel like something you'd find in a Legend of Zelda game rather than being a slightly jankily implemented idea in a game that can't really handle it. Each and every big encounter is incredibly memorable, with multiple of the greatest boss fights I've had the pleasure of experiencing being thrown towards you, especially a couple of the final ones. On the whole I really cannot agree with people who call Sekiro merely "Dark Souls but in Japan and with parrying" because it's so much more than that and ends up separating itself from the pack in so many ways. Phenomenal game through and through, and still not even my favourite Fromsoft game at the end of it all funnily enough, though it is pretty damn close and is, as said, easily the most polished and complete feeling of them too. Give this one a shot for sure, the learning curve basically extends across the entire game but it's done in a way where you feel like you're always better understanding your own capabilities and tools as your disposal and ultimately leads to an experience that the mere act of refining and mastering the combat is enough to drive one's desire to play through this many times over.
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Kempokid 2022-07-27T11:29:50Z
2022-07-27T11:29:50Z
4.5
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Plays great
The formula for combat is pretty simple, but it feels so good. Probably the most satisfying Souls-like game. I didn’t care for the story as much I did Dark Souls, however.
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yoyochinese 2022-06-10T15:04:51Z
2022-06-10T15:04:51Z
4.5
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Challenging but extremely satisfying.
FromSoftware has always been excellent with art direction and level design, but "Sekiro" is the first time they managed to pair the beautiful visuals up with a gameplay that is not just challenging but also fun and rewarding. The parrying works for once, and the posture system gives a whole new depth to the fights. We also have an extended set of sub-weapons that can be used to design different strategies and create new combos. It takes a while to get used to the combat system, but it gets a little better once you get familiar with the gadgets and confident with your parrying and reflexes. Buffs can help, but they rarely make up for the player's lack of skills.

The only problem is that the learning curve is steep and relentless, especially with the main bosses. Each boss has an entirely different moveset that needs to be learned and practiced from scratch. In other words, you are doomed to get defeated dozens of times and practice different strategies for hours, all to kill a single boss. It's a game for people who are willing to waste most of their free time into it. I usually get bored fast and give up with this kind of stuff, but somehow "Sekiro" managed to keep my motivation high. Maybe it's because battles are quick and enjoyable regardless of their outcome. The last couple of bosses might have been the only ones that really brought me close to destroying the disc.

It's a pity that there are no "normal" difficulty settings, as a slightly lower level of challenge would make this a much more accessible and well-received game. It definitely has the potential to set a new standard for action games.

On a side note, the stealth dynamics are a bit too primitive for an eighth-generation game. It's all about backstab deathblows, and the enemies are also deaf to the point that they don't even notice people dying a meter away or things being dropped around them. I won't complain as the game is already too difficult, but I was expecting more depth in that sense as we are supposed to impersonate a shinobi.
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manicure 2021-08-06T17:57:18Z
2021-08-06T17:57:18Z
90
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100% complete platinum campaign
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americanflotsam Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-28T04:40:29Z
2024-05-28T04:40:29Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Toaster_0 Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-28T04:22:47Z
2024-05-28T04:22:47Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
ziaf Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-28T00:49:14Z
2024-05-28T00:49:14Z
5.0
12
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Cognizant_Koala Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-27T14:29:51Z
2024-05-27T14:29:51Z
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
TrouvGames Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-27T06:01:28Z
2024-05-27T06:01:28Z
easy8
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AntonKasmyliou Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-26T14:26:03Z
2024-05-26T14:26:03Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Sindead28 Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-26T13:34:13Z
2024-05-26T13:34:13Z
5.0
1
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rdmamd Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-26T08:18:31Z
2024-05-26T08:18:31Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
weonadicto777 Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-25T15:50:57Z
2024-05-25T15:50:57Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
TurboThot Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-24T23:31:43Z
2024-05-24T23:31:43Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
MarilynRoxie Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-24T15:04:33Z
2024-05-24T15:04:33Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Rap_Prodigy Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice 2024-05-23T05:26:26Z
2024-05-23T05:26:26Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
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  • Previous comments (269) Loading...
  • INoLuv 2024-05-04 16:51:59.390755+00
    Removed by user
    This post was removed by the user.
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  • marco29 2024-05-10 06:03:51.835239+00
    it's funny that this is easily one of their best but the one where there's the least to talk about other than how good and different or how difficult it is
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  • INoLuv 2024-05-10 09:03:49.064763+00
    I am yet to see a game with a better combat than sekiro, especially melee-sword type of combat. Given how great and perfect the combat is and the deflect system, every game that is heavily inspired by it that comes close to it (though rarely perfect) is very likely to be a great game, if not another favorite of mine. The combat being simple makes it even better. 10/10 easily.
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  • Nergal997 2024-05-24 11:36:22.989486+00
    Easily the best FromSoft game.
    reply
    • ThrashingFairy 2024-05-26 07:44:52.575945+00
      Nah.
    • Nergal997 2024-05-26 22:54:35.669978+00
      Ok, not easily. But still the best.
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