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Rocket Knight Adventures

ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ

Developer / Publisher: Konami
06 August 1993
Rocket Knight Adventures [ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ] - cover art
Glitchwave rating
3.83 / 5.0
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181 Ratings / 2 Reviews
#533 All-time
#11 for 1993
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Releases 3
1993 Konami  
Cartridge
XEU 4 988602 610086
1993 Konami  
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US 8371716003
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Title
Sparkster could’ve, should’ve, would’ve been one of the prime gaming mascots of the 16-bit era, but didn’t. Sonic alone couldn’t have crushed Nintendo under the might of his blast processing-fueled swiftness, despite what Sega would have you believe. Sega formulated Sonic as a means to give Mario some gruff, but they failed to realize that Mario has compadres at Nintendo. While Mario is Nintendo’s golden boy, their lineup of other first-party franchises could possibly sustain the system even if Mario had been left to fester in obscurity in some alternate timeline. The Sega Genesis provided some solid exclusives, but the blue blur always eclipsed every other game in their library due to Sega giving him a goliath-sized precedence in their company. Something like Super Smash Bros. could come to fruition for Nintendo because they didn’t put all of their eggs in their Mario basket. Link, Samus, Kirby, Donkey Kong, etc. are all iconic figures who have the same kind of quality and longevity as Mario. Nintendo has always had a roster of mascots representing their brand, albeit to a lesser degree than Mario. Sega on the other hand would have complications in achieving the same kind of impact with their roster. Ristar? Vectorman? Who the fuck are they? Sparkster of Rocket Knight Adventures fame (using the term tentatively) would also fail to inspire any excitable recognition from most people like Sega’s other underlings. Unfortunately, his first exclusive outing on the Sega Genesis also sold horribly, giving Rocket Knight Adventures a cult classic status. It’s a damn shame considering if more people purchased Rocket Knight Adventures, there would’ve been a potential to give Sega a bigger advantage in the 16-bit console wars.

Sparkster’s design simply screams mascot material. How could anyone not love a sword-wielding possum dressed like a knight with goggles seated on his brow? If Sparkster doesn’t melt you with that adorable smile on the cover, you might be a cold-hearted sociopath. I wanna pick up the little guy and give him a big bear hug, only if his armor probably didn’t weigh a ton. Sparkster is a brilliantly designed character. Gaming companies consider their respective mascots to fall on the spectrum of either cute or cool, and Sparkster is the perfect mesh of both. All checks out in the design department, but how does this tech-savvy varmint control? The gameplay of Rocket Knight Adventures is much like its 2D platformer contemporaries. Gameplay is simple and easy to use, but the player must hone them to a certain degree to make it through the varied platforming and combat challenges the game provides. Sparkster however comes with some extra frills to his gameplay that makes Rocket Knight Adventures stand out. His base attack is the swing of his sword, but his blade is not a contact weapon. Each sword swipe will unleash a swirling projectile similarly like Link’s sword in The Legend of Zelda. Unlike Nintendo’s elfin wonderboy, getting hit at maximum health for Sparkster does not remove this move. In a way, Sparkster’s projectile-based primary weapon makes his gameplay more like a run-n-gun than a standard platformer. On the scope of platforming, Sparkster isn’t the most agile of platformer characters, but he does have some unique attributes. Sparkster will climb and swing off of various tree branches, vines, and other thin, ropey structures by his tail, cultivating his possumhood and using it to adapt to the land of the levels. It’s a wonder why he also doesn’t play dead to thwart unsuspecting enemies and then sneakily dispose of them like Solid Snake. More importantly to Sparkster’s platforming abilities than his innate marsupial instincts is the “rocket” alluded to in the title of the game. The jetpack situated on Sparkster’s back is an essential asset to Sparkster’s platforming gameplay and can be activated at any point. Holding down the attack button until the meter will charge the jetpack, and releasing it will shoot Sparkster across the map. Jetpack blasts can be also launched in a myriad of directions for different uses. Besides carrying Sparkster past tall obstacles, it can also be used as an attack move that does slightly more damage than a standard swipe. Charging the jetpack without a clear direction will execute a spin move that will damage any colliding enemies. The developers also implemented what can only be described as less fluid, more violent wall jumps to get more utility out of the jetpack than simply rocketing past everything. With a full charge meter, Sparkster will bounce off these walls in the blink of an eye, placing him in unprecedented heights. One must not use the jetpack too liberally however as the trajectory of its blasts is erratic and can often lead to Sparkster careening off the stage to his death. Sparkster’s moveset is one of the most interesting I’ve seen across any 2D platformer. It’s bombastic and requires a bit of practice to master, but his overall control still carries an aura of accessibility.

I mentioned before how Sparkster’s basic attack makes the game feel more like a run-n-gun game than a 2D platformer, but this extends to many other elements of the game as well. Rocket Knight Adventures was developed by Nobuya Nakazato, a Konami mainstay that is most notable for developing the Contra games. If there is one franchise synonymous with the run-and-gun genre, Contra should be the first to come to mind. While Sparkster’s arsenal doesn’t extend past his gleaming energy sword and it technically isn’t a gun, Rocket Knight Adventures still exudes the high-octane action of a run-and-gun game one would normally find in Contra. Enemies will bumrush Sparkster instead of waiting diligently for him to face them like the goombas and koopas of the Mushroom Kingdom. An immediate correlation that reminded me of Contra was the vehicle filled with enemies that attempted to turn Sparkster into roadkill, and vehicles of this kind are incredibly common in the run-n-gun genre. Oftentimes, the screen will stop scrolling when Sparkster is moving to introduce an enemy that will burst from the screen. In the second level, Sparkster finds himself on a railcar and has to defeat enemies while it speeds on the tracks. Sometimes the level will suggest the intended direction by planting a hovering “go!” sign on the screen. I’ve never seen any of these elements in any platformer game, but all of the aforementioned properties border on being run-n-gun cliches. Then again, I’ve never seen the platforming challenges Rocket Knight Adventures presents in a run-n-gun game either. Some particular highlights of the platforming sections are the vines accessible beneath the cascading water, seeing Sparkster’s reflection to see hidden platforms in a cave with rising lava, and a pulley machine which Sparkster can change the direction of lest he hits the series of radioactive spikes. Each level is also the perfect length that combines all of these elements and incorporates different themes and obstacles that make them individually fresh. Rocket Knight Adventures also incorporates another style of gameplay, although not as subtly. At a point in the first level, Sparkster will find a radiating capsule that propels his jetpack to full power as he glides across a body of water with his goggles over his eyes. These sections of Rocket Knight Adventures are highly reminiscent of the scrolling shooter sections of run-n-gun games, and there are no platformer elements interwoven in the makeup of these sections. These scrolling sections are fairly orthodox to the typical run-n-gun game, but they are still a welcome addition to shake up the already nuanced and varied gameplay.

Rocket Knight Adventures also possesses one of my biggest pet peeves in video games that is quite common among games of this era. For all of its charms, Rocket Knight Adventures will also kick the player’s ass from here to Indochina. This aspect however is not what irks me. Hard-as-nails games from this era also tend to have an unnecessary arcade style of continuation that forces the player to start the entire game over upon losing all of their lives. At least Rocket Knight Adventures grants the player multiple continuations unlike other games on the Genesis (*cough* Sonic cough*). Normally, the charm of a game would wear thin upon multiple deaths, but at least Konami understands the challenge and gives the player some leeway. Besides the four difficulty selections ranging from ball-bustingly hard to “children’s” difficulty (the old school platformer equivalent of Uncharted’s explorer difficulty), the game gives the player plenty of health items and extra lives spread across each level. Sparkster’s health and his damage input are also reasonable, so I can’t be too steamed at dying in this game despite it happening very often.

Rocket Knight Adventures probably tells a grand, epic tale that supports the gameplay, but one wouldn’t know just by playing it. The game has subtle cutscenes that take place spontaneously in each of the levels, and all of these aren’t enough to weave together a cohesive plot despite their individual charm. Sega ostensibly likes to borrow the looming, superweapon trope from Star Wars as a plot device (see the Sonic games for another example) because Rocket Knight Adventures shares the same commonality. The death machine in the case is the Pig Star, and the evil race of pigs Sparkster has been fighting are dangerously close to usurping the power of this annihilation planet-sized contraption. Axel, a rogue rocket knight who resembles a dark Sparkster, abducts a princess who has the key that accesses the Pig Star, and Sparkster must mow down hundreds of pigs to save the princess and prevent total annihilation. He faces both Axl (in a dueling giant robot which is one of my favorite parts of the game) and the enigmatic pig leader Devilgus and manages to escape their space headquarters with the princess and save the day. However, this is the canon “true ending” that the player must beat the game on the hardest difficulty level to unlock. What sort of qualifications does the player have to meet to see this ending? What must the player endure on the hardest difficulty of an already hard-as-nails game? A run with no continues where Sparkster dies with one hit. Seriously. I thought the unlocked ending content qualifications for Mr. Gimmick were bad, but this game ramps it up to an absurd degree. I suppose I can be happy with an ending where Sparkster at least leaves the base unscathed, and I guess I’d have to be, all things considered.

If I were Konami, I’d be pretty pissed at Sega. They carefully crafted this game to support Sega in their fight against the Nintendo giant, but Sega ultimately subordinated it in favor of their speedy blue bundle of joy just like with the rest of their exclusives. I’m going to take a stand and say that Sparkster and Rocket Knight Adventures as a whole does what Sonic don’t (see what I did there?) Sparkster has much more mascot allure than the smarmy Sonic, and his game is far more varied, engaging, and fair than Sega could dream of for their penultimate title. Nakazato either made the most adrenaline-fueled platformer or the most intricately designed run-n-gun game here, and I think there’s enough evidence for both outcomes. The foundation is tight and bursting with so much appeal and charisma that it might just be the best game on the Sega Genesis. It’s just unfortunate that most people, even at the time, didn’t come to the same realization.
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Erockthestrange 2022-04-26T01:04:10Z
2022-04-26T01:04:10Z
8.0
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Out of all the games I've played on the Genesis, Rocket Knight Adventures is easily the only one I'd call absolutely essential. Its flow, level design, art design, setpieces often involving bosses, music, and the gracefully implemented rocket mechanic are all so well done that I cannot consider Rocket Knight Adventures anything less than a masterpiece of a platformer. I also have to thank Rocket Knight Adventures for initially getting me into the speedrunning community, I picked it up back in 2011 after witnessing the GDQ 3-way race between Mike Uyama, Vorpal Edge and mike89, and it was a pretty friendly speedgame to pick up on the whole. Although I had done some running before, this is the game that got me involved with the community initially. So do keep in mind that this review, like most of my others, is written from the perspective of someone who is very interested in the depth of mechanics, how those relate to how the game was designed, and ultimately how you go about perfecting your gameplay and how rewarding of an experience this will turn out.

Leaving that aside for later, though, first I want to talk about and compliment the game's narrative, setting and the sense of adventure imposed on the player. I think Rocket Knight Adventures is a rare gem that really perfected and ultimately made something artistic and memorable out of the childish videogame formula of its time: chasing after the bad guys and saving the princess and the kingdom and all that crap. This game understands how to pull off a cinematic gameplay experience without boring you with cut scenes and the like. It's still pure gameplay. The game is very stylish and embraces brevity, yet has a lot of variation throughout. You play as Sparkster, an opossum knight wearing not only armor and wielding not only a sword, but he also has a rocket pack on his back and goggles for when he's flying... Sparkster is a very dynamic character with a variety of moves and wonderful animations, ranging from the sword cycle to how he dances cutely when standing still, to rocket spinning and flying. Sparkster is the hero of the game and that is communicated gallantly befitting of a rocket knight. In between each level there's a brief cut scene of maybe half a minute at most, the story is kinda building up each level showing glimpses of what's to come and providing mood. This part is a bit difficult to explain for me, but I can't think of any other childish console game from that era that does this as well as RKA did.

The regular gameplay involves jumping, slashing, and charging which allows you to release a rocket boost in 8 directions or to do a spin attack move. Boosting into some enemies will bounce you off of them while dealing damage whereas boosting through popcorns moves you through them. The boost does significant damage but in some cases you can get a lot more damage in by slashing at enemies pointblank as the damage system in the game is quite weird. Basically each part of your sword does damage so the more of your sword that hits the more damage you'll do. That's only true for some enemies, though. Other enemies die in one hit or need a certain amount of hits taken to die and hitting them normally makes them invulnerable for a while.

The segments of each level are generally gorgeously, professionally composed, and the transformation of the high fantasy setting to steam punk and space travel is ridiculously perfect. The first part of the third stage is really amazing. The crystal blocks your vision, but reflects the real action, so you use your reflection to make your way through. Beautiful visuals and well done gimmick. Most stages just relentlessly throw very brief little mini portions at you which are all totally unique ideas within the game. For example, the 2nd stage introduces swimming, and gives you a linear water path which is over in a matter of maybe 20 seconds. You fight a midboss, then there's a few enemy boats. Then there's like 5 seconds of vine climbing and then the game switches things up completely yet again by introducing a second layer of platforming behind the water. Use to platforms to be on one or the other side. The game throws another midboss at you where you have to utilize this mechanic. After this fight, that's it, that's the last you see of this idea. Now you're in a cave, avoiding spikes, killing bats. This cave is also over in an instant. Then there's a single screen of spikes at the top and bottom that move up and down, which is literally over in 2 seconds or so... Then you're outside, riding a minecart, platforming on minecarts and fighting pig guys with bombs and avoiding spikes. This is the only part of the stage that is actually more than 1 minute long. Then you fight a train boss while riding a minecart. The boss also has many variations with its phases, the most entertaining one being when you have to attack its arms. So that's the 2nd stage, it's only a few minutes long but the amount of ideas in it is just unbelievable. Most stages are like this. The bosses in general are fucking radical. You fight a lot of cool mechs in this game. At one point you're in a big mech yourself duking it out with your rival, Axel Gear. Axel Gear is an opposum knight just like you, except hes evil. That's all you really need to know. The final fight against him is pretty damn atmospheric.

The soundtrack is also perhaps my favourite ever. Especially the song for the 6th stage, that is my favourite video game song of all time. It's unlikely I would like RKA anywhere near as much without the god tier soundtrack. Pretty much all the stages have amazing music but especially the last 3 (part 1 for stage 5).

So to sum it up, RKA has an insane amount of ideas crammed in its short playtime, artistic and badass presentation, superb gameplay mechanics and great core gameplay in general, godlike flow and soundtrack, very replayable perhaps will be a little frustrating on the first playthrough though. God tier game. There are very few things about that that I don't like, mostly the boredom of some bosses on repeat playthroughs (3rd, 4th and 6th ones mainly get booooring in a speed run) and it just feels like as great as the game is, some more areas with that delicious "normal" gameplay would've been nice. It is both a good and bad speedgame simultaneously, as it is not quite as deep as the mechanics initially would have you believe. The game has so many unique ideas but in reality many of them result in some unfortunately stale speedrunning. So I both love this game yet I recognize that it is perhaps not suitable as a serious timesink.
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Mighty Mouse
An utterly charming game. Not the most difficult experience you will ever come across, but not as drop dead easy as, say, Castle of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse [Mega Drive/Genesis] [アイラブミッキーマウス ふしぎのお城大冒険]. Very well designed, and never did I feel irritated by the gameplay, which is something in itself because I will usually find something to moan about.
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Paulie_Jay 2016-07-18T15:50:45Z
2016-07-18T15:50:45Z
5.0
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Catalog

typob ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-06-03T10:03:37Z
2024-06-03T10:03:37Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
SemtexRevolution ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-05-25T02:06:13Z
2024-05-25T02:06:13Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
polland ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-04-15T12:26:23Z
2024-04-15T12:26:23Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
legiontheai ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-03-16T10:46:35Z
2024-03-16T10:46:35Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
dolu ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-03-11T14:03:57Z
2024-03-11T14:03:57Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
eliottstaten ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-03-11T04:12:24Z
2024-03-11T04:12:24Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Gibbous ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-03-06T17:01:41Z
2024-03-06T17:01:41Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Kremling98 ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-03-03T14:36:42Z
2024-03-03T14:36:42Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
buddysnatcher ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-02-24T22:36:06Z
2024-02-24T22:36:06Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
xtremedante Rocket Knight Adventures 2024-02-08T01:44:14Z
Mega Drive/Genesis • US
2024-02-08T01:44:14Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Luminostre Rocket Knight Adventures 2024-02-07T14:47:59Z
Mega Drive/Genesis • US
2024-02-07T14:47:59Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
thereitis ロケットナイトアドベンチャーズ 2024-01-21T04:48:44Z
2024-01-21T04:48:44Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
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  • Previous comments (4) Loading...
  • YNFG 2021-06-29 20:12:21.527529+00
    grayfruit-core
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  • MisTurHappy 2022-08-16 20:33:55.059536+00
    That fanfare that plays at every begin level screen makes me rock hard.
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  • shidwar 2023-07-01 16:21:35.151442+00
    feels like a 2017 retro revival game in the best ways
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  • IgnacioMoreno 2023-08-14 08:05:32.746488+00
    Sparkster is my pick for cutest video game character. He's cool too.
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  • dr0pside 2023-12-17 21:21:22.048083+00
    Really good game but it's the definition of trial and error
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  • Regal_Throes 2024-01-02 18:42:09.974406+00
    Probably the greatest game ever made with an opossum.
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  • longestseason 2024-01-24 17:14:16.678948+00
    looking at the us cover art i now found out that sega had its own seal of quality back in the day :0
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