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Mega Man 2

Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎

Developer / Publisher: Capcom
24 December 1988
Mega Man 2 [Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎] - cover art
Glitchwave rating
3.79 / 5.0
0.5
5.0
 
 
1,040 Ratings / 12 Reviews
#494 All-time
#3 for 1988
After his initial defeat, Dr. Wily, the series' main antagonist, creates his own set of Robot Masters in an attempt to counter Mega Man: Metal Man, Air Man, Bubble Man, Quick Man, Crash Man, Flash Man, Heat Man, and Wood Man.
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1988 Capcom  
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JP 4 976219 012133 CAP-XR
1989 Capcom  
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XNA 0 13388 11011 7 NES-XR-USA
1990 Capcom  
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1990 Capcom  
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1999 Capcom  
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JP 4 976219 354738 SLPS-02255
2007 Capcom  
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ロックマン2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 初代PSアーカイブス
2009 Capcom  
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Mega Man 2 PS one Classic
2011 Capcom SCE  
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Title
Blue man
Its a really hard game, but not exactly the sort of difficulty i appreciate. Being a runner and gunner, the challenge of the game lies in the both the enemies and the platforming. The enemies for the most part are easy to defeat, even bosses are quite easy to defeat on the first try. The main issue with the game is the platforming. The game loves to troll you as a player, offering you a lot of dead ways and insta death bottomless pits. Its simply not enjoyable to die like this. I think there are a lot of level design philosophies of the NES era that i dislike, and for that reason i cant enjoy these games as much as i would like. This feels like one of the game that best illustrates the strenghs and weaknesses of the games of that time, and considering its status i think it is pretty essencial for everyone to give it a try.
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Threntall 2016-06-21T13:26:07Z
2016-06-21T13:26:07Z
2.5
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There's not a single enjoyable moment in this gameplay-wise, but the charmingly primitive programmer art bumps this up from a 0.5 to a 1.0.
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nintara 2023-07-08T21:40:25Z
2023-07-08T21:40:25Z
1.0
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I failed to mention this in my review of the first Mega Man but when I first played the blue bomber’s debut title, I didn’t like it. I am a child of the 2000s, which means I grew up accustomed to the frills that came with 3D gaming such as save features and reasonable difficulty curves. My earliest gaming experiences were the cumulative product of burgeoning change that made gaming smoother and more accessible for everyone, and this rate of progress has only become even more apparent since then. It’s not a cardinal rule that the parameters of one’s gaming repertoire should start at the base of when they started gaming to the current day, so why does playing games before one’s debut generation not come recommended by many? I’ve fervently argued that art and entertainment of yesteryears should be at least considered or at least respected by those whose existence came after the piece’s release date, for it can still retain its essentials that stand the test of time. However, my experience with the first Mega Man as a child tested my laurels and made me skeptical about the overall quality of “retro games.” That allurement of Mega Man’s that I alluded to struck me while reading about his classic titles in an issue of Nintendo Power sometime in the 2000s. The NES Mega Man titles still grabbed me with their promise of high-octane shooting action and tight platforming despite their primitiveness. What I didn’t anticipate was the game throttling me around like a rag doll, leaving me bruised and battered. Each of the Robot Master’s stages was uniquely punishing, and finally learning a comfortable sequential order to defeat them didn’t matter when I faced the sun-colored brick wall known as The Yellow Devil. Instead of throwing in a tear-soaked towel, something curious caught my eye about its sequel, Mega Man 2. Ironically, the optimal title in the classic Mega Man series for optimistic beginners is not the first title, as Mega Man 2 is considered by most to be the grand champion of the series. In just one following entry, the rudimentary snags that made the first Mega Man so excruciating were remedied to an exceptional degree.

On the surface, Mega Man 2 doesn’t improve on its rough template too much with considerable deviation. Our charismatic robot boy sees himself on another valiant quest to defeat the deranged Dr. Wily and his league of themed Robot Masters and save his futuristic world from total chaos. The key difference this time in relation to the first game is that Dr. Wily has cooked up this new batch of Robot Masters himself and there are eight of them instead of six. Once again, the player has the choice of routing Mega Man on a course of destroying the robotic menaces, while briskly being directed towards a sensible trajectory depending on the elemental powers Mega Man absorbs from them. Mega Man 2 is not a reboot disguised as a sequel like the Evil Deads of the world, but it is an indication that Mega Man has solidified a formula that will persist with each entry. The problem with the first Mega Man was obviously not a case of an ill-conceived idea falling apart at the seams. Mega Man needed some significant sanding down and refurbishing in order to bloom as the exemplary 2D platformer series on the NES. The effort to polish Mega Man was not a painstaking overhaul, but the slight improvements made a world of difference.

Unlike the three Super Mario games on the NES, the Mega Man series did not receive a new coat of pixelated paint with each new title. At first glance, Mega Man 2 is a carbon copy of the first game from an aesthetic standpoint. However, one can discern a substantial amount of detail by squinting at the graphical intricacies in the fine mineral textures in the pixels. This level of refinement is displayed as early as the game’s pre-menu introduction which sees a sprawling, futuristic metropolis in evening shade, with the deep color palette perfectly capturing the tone of the scene. Scrolling up the skyscraper sees Mega Man standing on its roof sans his helmet, and the wind of the high altitudes ruffles his black hair. It’s the most indelible image of the game and quite possibly the whole series, and it sets a precedent for how the game has improved upon Mega Man’s visuals. For one, Mega Man himself has been treated to a subtle hint of refinement that many might not catch. Mega Man’s pixelated outline is no longer as pronounced as an unplucked eyebrow, as it has been shaved down with an 8-bit thin razor. Along with the blue bomber, the foregrounds, and backgrounds of each stage look like they’ve been on the operating table in the year between Mega Man 1 and 2. They’ve been transformed to more appropriately fit the theme set around the specific Robot Master. Metal Man’s stage has a crop of rotating gears to set the scene of an industrial factory. Wood Man’s stage is an auburn color with a wavy, timbered texture to simulate venturing through the insides of an immensely-sized tree in the forest. The background of Flash Man’s stage is bright and glitzy, aptly enough for the Robot Master who resides in it, and the sweltering atmosphere of Heat Man’s stage radiates strongly off the red brick walls enough to make Mega Man sweat, (if he had those glands, anyways) as opposed to the stage of the warmth-themed Robot Master from the previous game. Stages in Mega Man 2 feel much more immersive thanks to the great strides in detail compared to the empty blue and black backgrounds and globular foregrounds of the stages in the foreground in the first game. Mega Man looking less like he has a thick layer of filth around him is also a bonus perk.

The overall level design in Mega Man 2 is as intricate as the visuals. In the first game, most of the levels were focused on precision platforming, whether they be trying to keep Mega Man’s footing over a pit of perilous spikes or falling into the abyss. While that’s still a prevalent aspect of Mega Man’s level structure here, the focal point of each stage in Mega Man 2 is also better centered around the theme of each Robot Master. Accompanying the clockwise rotation of the gears in Metal Man’s stage are conveyor belt platforms, a reasonable trope of factory settings that either accelerate or slacken Mega Man’s movement in the undesired direction. The urgency of Quick Man’s stage is highlighted by an infamous section involving a series of energy beams that jet out of every corner of the screen, disintegrating Mega Man on impact if they catch him. Many abhor this section because of the unpredictability of where the beams will appear and how rapidly they zoom out to blast Mega Man in the face from potentially anywhere. While I can understand their grievances, the tense reaction time needed to avoid the beams evokes the thrill of being chased. Once Mega Man plunges into the lake below the gorgeously roaring waterfall of Bubble Man’s stage, we learn that Dr. Light was insightful enough to equip Mega Man with a resistance to water. Even though his robotic pride and joy can withstand being submerged in the drink, Mega Man’s buoyancy is tested by the physics of his standard jump being manipulated. Acclimating to the rate of movement underwater and adjusting it to avoid the stinging, deadly-as-spikes sea urchins takes some time to master. Keeping afloat in Air Man’s stage is reminiscent of platforming challenges where Mega Man falls to oblivion in Mega Man 1, but the course of the cloud platforms and the drill barriers of the strange tiki heads is consistent and easier to learn. Reappearing block sections make their return in Heat Man’s stage, and their patterns are much less unhinged and demanding compared to the asymmetrical, almost avant-garde patterns seen in Ice Man’s stage. Inhibitors while climbing ladders in Crash Man’s stage don’t knock Mega Man down to the previous screen, and enemy placements can be detected far in advance before they pounce. Returning attributes to Mega Man’s stages have been made much more manageable, and the variety of the new attributes offer a fair challenge without seeming like irritating gimmicks.

If one couldn’t tell from their names or descriptions of their levels, the eight new Robot Masters are another ragtag crew with an eclectic range of physical differences. While these differences are apparent, the player must once again surmise a logical matching of their powers to inflict on one another like a more puzzling game of rock, paper, and scissors. The reasonable path in the first Mega Man game was based on elemental tropes like earth, wind, fire, and ice, but the characteristics of the Robot Masters in Mega Man 2 are less conspicuous. No, the rhyme scheme between Flash Man and Crash Man does not correlate with their weaknesses. The path to Dr. Wily that defeating all eight Robot Masters leads to involves more clever consideration. Examples include using Air Man’s multiple cyclones on Crash Man because turbulence can cause a crash, clogging up Air Man with Wood Man’s leaves like a jet turbine, and Flash Man stopping time to halt Quick Man’s speedy maneuvers. Or, you can do what everyone does and seek out Metal Man first, for his Metal Blade weapon is a force to be reckoned with. The projectile saw blade can be tossed in eight different directions, deals twice the damage of the standard blaster, and barely expends any amount of energy. Imposing it on most of the Robot Masters also tends to make the health bars plummet like the 1929 stock market. You know the old adage not to bring a knife to a gunfight? I have a new saying: do not bring any weapon against the Metal Blade, for you will be smote by its power. For those who do not revel in the almighty awesomeness of the Metal Blade, they tend to argue that the pervasive use of this item compromises on the utility of each weapon, but I was feeling too righteous and badass while using it to care. Besides, the other weapons have their own uses as well, whether it’s a matter of the game forcing it on the player or not.

Mega Man 2’s considerable leap in quality may boil down to the developers making the experience easier, which may draw some contempt from NES purists who might contest the game’s legacy and mock players like myself who couldn’t handle the consistent onslaught of torment the first game bestowed. Considering how abundant the amount of energy/health items and extra lives are on the field of Mega Man 2, their arguments aren’t baseless. However, I don’t think Mega Man 2 is a breezy cakewalk to Dr. Wily’s domain. I’ve already expressed that the challenges leading up to him in the Robot Master’s levels involve considerable skill to surpass. The developers have made a substantial effort to balance Mega Man’s difficulty by aiding the player through the rudimentary regulations of the NES era. A password system is instated instead of expecting the player to finish the game in one sitting, the most primitive form of saving progress that did not persist past the pixelated eras. Password systems at least put one’s progress into consideration, but writing down a jumble of codes on paper is not my idea of being accommodating. Because losing one’s progress is still a harsh reality in Mega Man 2, the developers offer a smattering of aid trinkets to keep the player in the fray. Among the excess of automatic replenishing items, Mega Man 2 sees the birth of the series staple Energy Tank, with no relation to the item of the same name from Metroid. Mega Man pops these cerulean cans as Popeye does to spinach, and they revitalize his health to its maximum capacity. Mega Man can carry up to a total of four at a time, and the precarious placements these tanks are placed in offer a risk-reward incentive. The awkward implementation of the “optional” Magnet Beam from the first game has been reconfigured into three support weapons, and each of them serves to mitigate the hazardous and or tedious sections of the game far more comfortably than their prototype. Dr. Light also rewards Mega Man with one of these support weapons after a certain number of slain Robot Masters, cementing their importance and assuring that Mega Man won’t be hopelessly stuck *ahem.* Mega Man’s developers aren’t rewriting the NES rulebook, but I appreciate that they’re willing to bend it a bit to express concern for the player’s well-being.

Unfortunately, good intentions ultimately fall flat when those performing those noble deeds don’t think things through. Once again, a Mega Man game eventually accelerates headfirst into an impervious wall. Actually, in this context, Mega Man 2’s impenetrable force is more like falling down a one-hundred-foot well. Also, this impediment occurs at Dr. Wily’s Castle, but at least it isn’t as early as the first section while crossing the fortress’s lawn. Up until the fourth section, Dr. Wily’s castle seems to have reduced its security measures. The first section greatly utilizes the three support items, and the dark arena with the sparse, airborne grounding in which Mega Man fights the dragon is tense enough that one slip will signal Mega Man’s doom. When the arena itself is the boss of the second section, it makes the player use the Metal Blade more shrewdly, and the third section allows the player to practice more underwater jumping. Then, the fourth section comes along to ruin everything. The boss that awaits Mega Man in the final stretch of the fourth section is not another cybernetic behemoth, but a series of five electrical domes situated along the walls parallel to the arena. These domes are impervious to everything in Mega Man’s arsenal except for the Crash Bomber, and nothing before this would’ve warranted using this weapon. Even if Mega Man’s Crash Bomber meter is full, his attempt to blow out all of these domes will most likely result in failure. The Crash Bomber can only be fired seven times, and four of the five domes are protected by Crash Bomber walls. Eight shots exceed the total energy capacity of the Crash Bomber, so the player must consider a more analytical strategy when destroying the domes, almost like a puzzle. However, it’s unlikely that the player will anticipate something this cerebral in an action-intensive 2D platformer, and considering an approach to this bizarre boss fight while the domes are also firing energy balls at Mega Man is disorienting. After the player is unprepared for this demanding duel, depleting all of the Crash Bomber’s energy gauge will result in a stalemate. Leaving Mega Man without any further recourse will ultimately force the player to restart the entire game, making all the progress up to this point all for naught. Regarding the fiddly circumstance surrounding the Magnet Beam, at least the player can die and come back fully prepared. Here, the player is left crestfallen in a void of defeat that takes drastic measures to escape. I don’t think the developers deliberately designed this boss to hornswoggle the player, for I can use the dozens of aids they implemented that were intended to help the player survive as evidence of their altruism. All this boss needed was some serious beta testing, and the fact that this remained overlooked is egregiously inexcusable.

The Dome boss dilemma could’ve been solved via the Energy Tanks replenishing both health and energy. In fact, this would’ve been a convenience at other points in the game, namely in the section that follows if the player managed to surpass the seemingly unsurpassable. Similarly to the first game, Mega Man will have to face a gauntlet of the eight Robot Masters, only the player somewhat has a choice of the order to tackle them in. The Crash Bomber isn’t necessary during this battle royale, as the designated Robot master Quick Man is the most vulnerable to the traditional blaster out of the eight. Even if the Dome boss taught the player a lesson in conservation, the Wily Boss that follows will make that a moot point. The energy of every weapon doesn’t replenish after completing a level, and guess which of Mega Man’s weapons Wily’s floating ship is weak to? The fucking Crash Bomber. Even though other weapons will deal damage to Dr. Wily’s aircraft, the barrage of undodgeable orbs from the airship's cannons make this a match of conflicting damage output that should ideally end sooner than later with the Crash Bomber. The final fight against Wily’s alien form which turns out to be an Oz routine is made into a facile joke with Bubble Man’s weapon, but what if the player expunged all of the weapon’s juice while fighting Heat Man? Not every weapon has the sustainability of the Metal Blade, you know. If the game isn’t going to grant the player a refuel item for the energy meter, then it should at least fully restock every weapon after the level is completed. Sounds reasonable, right?

It hurts how close Mega Man is to 2D platforming perfection. Forget for a second about the incredible strides the game makes to dwarf its predecessor in every conceivable fashion. Mega Man 2 is almost the golden standard of the NES library, ascending over its contemporaries by crafting a smoother, more accessible product that still provided a steep challenge that wouldn’t alienate the masochistic NES audience that took pride in playing games equivalent to eating a bowl of nails. To everyone’s dismay, that damned NES-era abrasiveness made another unceremonious appearance in Wily’s Castle, and a betrayal hasn’t cut as deep since Fredo fucked over Michael . Even the most seasoned NES enthusiasts find that particular section to be harsh. While Mega Man 2, unfortunately, exudes undesirable qualities that show the series needs more time baking in the kiln, I can still forgive the notorious point of no return that was inflicted upon me. You see, everything leading up to that point finally met my expectations for Mega Man that were almost dashed by the consistent punishment that the first game dealt. Mega Man 2’s well-ordered execution of the prevalent 2D platformer genre erased all narrow preconceptions I had for games released before my time. For that, I am eternally grateful.
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Erockthestrange 2017-07-21T20:04:05Z
2017-07-21T20:04:05Z
9.5
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Metal Blade is Capcom's 1988 follow-up to the previous year's hit Thunder Beam with Pause Trick. The joke of course being that the weapon you receive from being Metal Man breaks the entire game in half, but it's fun as fuck because of it, or at least it balances a degree of difficulty I found absurd when first trying to play this as a kid with Mega Man Anniversary Collection.

Mega Man 2 builds on the original Mega Man by establishing more elements that would stay for much of the rest of the "Classic" franchise. The number of Robot Masters is increased to eight, you get bonus traversal "Items" from some stages (an expansion on the first game's Magnet Beam), and Energy Tanks can be stocked up to heal yourself mid-game.

This installment is commonly considered "the best" of the Classic series, and I might agree, if not for the fact that I've only finished the first two games thus far.... But, where my enjoyment of the first game owed in large part to the ease of the pause-trick, so to do I enjoy this one for abuse of Metal Blade, which is maybe not the most "legitimate" way to play/enjoy the game, but I think it probably doesn't matter so long as I have fun, and anyway I look forward to replay this a lot.

One thing that bugs me a bit is how the rock-paper-scissors weakness-cycle of Robot Masters to their peers' weapons isn't as "tight" as in the first game, and in extension the Wily bosses' particular weaknesses have tenuous logic. In the first game, the six RMs have a circle to their weakness-cycle. I think the rough order is Quick beats Metal beats Bubble beats Heat beats Wood beats Air beats Crash beats Flash beats Quick. But Metal Blade also makes short work of Flashman, whom some people say takes increased damage from the weapon (I always spam MB as soon as the fight starts, and never bother with anything else against him), and it seems Woodman dies pretty fast to it (though I always use the fully-charged Atomic Fire). Metal Man himself dies to a single Metal Blade, which... makes no sense, or at least I'm used to Metalman.EXE in Mega Man Battle Network [ロックマンエグゼ] being a tank with Super Armor, so I always assumed the Robot Master version to be tougher, not unlike the later Hardman, and should be impervious to his own weapon, like some other RMs just deflect the Metal Blade. Anyway, for Wily bosses, the Quick Boomerang makes sense against the Dragon, as its arc allows you to safely hit the thing, but I guess Atomic Fire would work because the thing is apparently a giant helium balloon. Apparently the Bubble Lead shits on the little block guys in the second Wily Stage boss fight, but I just used Metal Blade because it can fire in eight directions and those dudes spawn in different spots on the screen. I think I used Quick Boomerang on Guts Tank, but I don't remember if I looked it up before hand or if I just happened to try it out. The Boobeam Trap is apparently notoriously tricky, unable to die but by Crash Bombs, and requiring you to use all seven of your ammo in the fight, apparently even allowing you to destroy some walls, kill yourself, and come back with the destroyed things still gone. I knew of the Crash Bomb weakness going in, but there are destructible walls all over the place to heavily hint toward that weakness, the only "trick" being to fall from a higher platform in such a way as to stick a Crash Bomb that would destroy one Boobeam and a nearby wall, which I may have been able to intuit, but it's ruined because I saw it online first. The Wily Machine 2's windshield can be easily destroyed by fully-charged Atomic Fire or Crash Bombs, which isn't really obvious, but could probably be inferred. The open cockpit is still weak to Crash Bombs, but I personally found Metal Blades to be more than sufficient, which is less a "proper" weakness and more a "brute force" test. The "Alien" at the end can only be damaged by Bubble Lead, which makes no fucking sense.

On that note, I think a large part of why I love this game is simply the "twist" after the final boss. The "Alien" is just a drone floating around and shooting you while a hologram takes the shape for its body. Reminds me a lot of Spider-Man: Far From Home, which of course came out over thirty years later....
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Banana_PD 2022-07-10T00:55:21Z
2022-07-10T00:55:21Z
5.0
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A little bit too hard for my tastes but a pretty great platforming experience. The levels are very memorable and well-designed. The music's great. The incorporation of tools into Mega Man's moveset is nice for giving levels more personality.

My big beef is some of those bosses where the solution is a single specific weapon, like the boss of Wily 4 where you have to carefully use bombs to navigate the boss room and eliminate the Boobeam Traps. What about the very final battle where you damage intake is so high and the only way to beat the boss is by using Lead Bubbles? Pretty nasty!

Update: I have replayed Mega Man 2 and think it's pretty excellent aside from some nasty biz.
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DoubleCakes 2021-07-09T17:30:44Z
2021-07-09T17:30:44Z
4.5
3
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The main Mega Man series is one that's never been particularly interested in reinventing itself or taking particularly massive strides from game to game. Instead of this, it looks to the option of adding safer, less intrusive changes from game to game hoping to gradually improve the formula in a way that never alienates the player. With this said, Mega Man 2 is the game that feels as if it made some of the more dramatic changes in the series for a little while, which makes sense given how simplistic and in many ways, flawed the first game could be. That said, despite some changes, advancements and improvements, I'd hesitate to call this a outright better or even more enjoyable game compared to the first in my eyes, as for the amount of polish more areas had, it still often could suffer from the same design issues as the first game, sometimes to an even greater extent.

I'll start this off with a couple of positive points however, as there are definitely some extremely cool things the game does that I love. The change in formula from 6 to 8 robot masters you need to fight really makes the game feel more rounded and interesting, especially when combined with the more complex, varied stages and diverse weapons that you get given. It really feels like they took the ideas from Mega Man 1, but instead of the stages centring around a single gimmick, things feel as if they progress far more here, with multiple different mechanics often unique to that particular stage working in tandem to make for a collection of highly distinct, engaging stages. This makes for some great gameplay variety, constantly throwing the player into new scenarios they have to come to grips with, one moment standing on moving platforms while dodging enemies, the next climbing ladders and having to figure out how to avoid falling down as swarm after swarm of birds fly at you.

It also feels like some serious improvements were made to the boss designs in general most of them having multiple attacks rather than being based around only needing to learn how to deal with a single thing, making them generally more engaging and challenging. The weapons are largely more interesting as well, giving the player a variety of options, each one being capable in certain niche scenarios, making experimentation during more difficult sections often greatly rewarding once the player is able to figure out the optimal way to approach a situation. This is also where greater emphasis on mobility items was implemented, with each type allowing the player to get to additional pickups or even skip certain tricky sections if utilised correctly, and gives an additional layer of complexity to the platforming aspect of the game.

Unfortunately, most of the positives for the game some with something negative to balance them out. With stages, while the greater variety and amount of levels to the game largely contributes to a more diverse, engaging gameplay experience, the bad stages feel considerably worse conceived here. The trial and error unfair difficulty of the NES comes in full force in a couple of stages, one being Quick Man's which while undoubtedly a fast paced, fun and exhilarating level from my perspective, is impossible to ignore for the fact that giving the player such little time to dodge through all the obstacles lest they're instantly killed is quite unfair. With this said, Heat Man's stage full of disappearing platforms over death chasms feels even worse when combined with timing and positioning of these disappearing blocks that feels as if it intentionally is attempting to throw the player off and just require a lot of death's until they've memorised everything. The issue with these is the fact that rather than testing the finer aspects of a player's skill and execution to create a satisfying, fulfilling experience to play through, it instead relies entirely on rote learning, making the point in which a player finally get through feel less exciting, and more just having them thinking that thank god it's over.

Similarly, while the boss design has been made more complex and often engaging, it's balanced by some more fights that feel as if they were entirely not suited to be fought without their weakness in mind. Of the robot masters, the main 3 are Crash Man, designed to respond to attacks in such a way that it's frustrating to even hit him, Quick Man, for his erratic movement and almost complete lack of pattern, instead going for the approach of hopping around wildly and throwing projectiles whenever he feels, and Air Man, who often throws out attacks that are genuinely impossible to dodge. While I appreciate further encouraging the player to utilise their entire arsenal, it simultaneously feels counterintuitive to allowing the player to choose stages in whatever order they desire when some are borderline impossible to complete without having beaten other stages first. While having an optimal route is cool and contributes to replayability and is conducive to experimentation, going as far as to make large portions of it to be almost required makes this idea feel closer to artificial lengthening of play time, an approach that makes sense given that NES games often did this to get the most from limited hardware, but nonetheless works to the detriment of the majority of them.

While the majority of weapons have their own niche uses to allow the player to handle most situations, a lot of this admittedly feels a bit pointless with the metal blade that's so powerful that it makes most options obsolete by being powerful, extremely versatile, and cheap to use, essentially having 0 downsides other than trivialising a lot of the game. With this said, there is one glaring issue in relation to weapon costs, that being that weapon energy doesn't refill between deaths, making grinding sometimes necessary if you don't have enough to use one that's required for a particular section. This is particularly problematic in the infamous boss fight that requires the player to use literally all of a particular weapon to defeat it, with nothing else working, and death meaning that it's impossible to beat them without grinding back up to full weapon power, poorly designed and tedious in a number of ways.

Despite all the negativity I've had, it's still near-impossible to deny how much fun and charming this game is, and how well put-together it is for the console it was on. Mega Man truly is one of the leading examples of early game philosophies being overcome in certain respects, with more emphasis being put on naturally guiding the player through a lot of it without requiring them to tirelessly exhaust all possible combinations to potentially come across the answer, with even some of the more difficult situations in the game being intuitively designed to teach the player long before they're taken to the deep end. Despite the fact that this sometimes falls through and gives way to all the annoying tropes of the system, this is still a very good game in a lot of respects that I enjoy about as much as the first entry in the series, and can see why it's often regarded as one of the cornerstones of the NES.
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Kempokid 2021-06-26T08:52:51Z
2021-06-26T08:52:51Z
3.5
1
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HipHopJugend Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-10-04T16:07:21Z
2023-10-04T16:07:21Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
crypton42 Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-10-03T19:21:20Z
2023-10-03T19:21:20Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
sicl Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-10-03T19:18:47Z
2023-10-03T19:18:47Z
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BoreCanal Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-10-03T17:28:20Z
2023-10-03T17:28:20Z
3.0
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NaturalKira Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-29T03:33:25Z
2023-09-29T03:33:25Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Psychocow Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-27T15:47:21Z
2023-09-27T15:47:21Z
5.0
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Manygodsnomasters Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-27T08:12:32Z
2023-09-27T08:12:32Z
4.5
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MetaQuipzz Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-26T20:26:24Z
2023-09-26T20:26:24Z
3.5
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Zeronightshade Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-25T04:12:47Z
2023-09-25T04:12:47Z
2.5
1
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Kowareta99 Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-24T05:17:45Z
NES • JP
2023-09-24T05:17:45Z
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IristheSiren Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-21T20:55:11Z
2023-09-21T20:55:11Z
4.5
1
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mranger87 Rockman 2 Dr.ワイリーの謎 2023-09-19T01:39:53Z
2023-09-19T01:39:53Z
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Also known as
  • ロックマン2 Dr.ワイリーの謎
  • Mega Man 2
  • Rokkuman 2 Dr. Wairī no Nazo
  • Rockman 2: The Mystery of Dr. Wily
  • Mega Man 2 Mobile
  • View all [5] Hide

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  • Previous comments (14) Loading...
  • Pastellix 2023-01-02 14:12:34.658561+00
    When I was 13, I always used to play through this game with the default buster not knowing that the enemies had weaknesses. I never made it to the end as a result, but I managed to get pretty deep into Wily's castle before those beam guys fucked with me. Very strange to be able to trivialise everything with the metal blade years later lol. I feel like I'm playing the game wrong.

    It wouldn't make much sense within the context of what this series is, but I've always thought that it would be a more interesting concept for Mega Man to start out with all the buster weapons and lose whichever ones he uses to kill the robot masters with at the end of each stage (before maybe regaining them or something once you reach Wily's Castle). You could also have it so that Mega Man is only able to fight the boss with whatever weapon you have selected going in order to prevent switching to whatever is most disposable at the last bits of health. TL;DR I've never liked how the early parts of these games consist of coasting between stages to pick out the least difficult boss before everything becomes exponentially easier.
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  • xNobility 2023-03-30 19:33:59.055728+00
    My cat enjoys watching me play games sometimes and this has easily been his favorite for some reason. Probably the colors I dunno
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  • shidwar 2023-04-13 17:03:52.549144+00
    wily 4 is legitimately so fucking bad lol. the rest of the game is almost perfect but that stage is so poorly designed and the boss ruins it
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    • shidwar 2023-04-13 17:17:13.4887+00
      that being said this is the best soundtrack on the NES
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  • Cody645 2023-04-20 18:56:08.116489+00
    Thanks
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  • thesoyman 2023-06-13 05:06:45.499924+00
    Amazing ost, reasonably difficult but not extremely cheap level design, significantly more variety visually and sonically than super mario bros 3 and replayable as fuck, best games of the 80s
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  • thesoyman 2023-06-13 05:07:02.812052+00
    Smb3 close 2nd tho
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  • Revolution666 2023-09-09 04:52:10.953536+00
    I just cannot get into these 2D Mega Man games at all. Even if some of them are well-designed in many ways, they're so obnoxiously difficult to the point of feeling like a chore way more than they're actually fun.
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