Charts Genres Community
Charts Genres Community Settings
Login

Elden Ring

24 February 2022
Elden Ring - cover art
Glitchwave rating
4.41 / 5.0
0.5
5.0
 
 
932 Ratings / 7 Reviews
#7 All-time
#1 for 2022
The Golden Order is broken...

The Elden Ring has been shattered in the Lands Between. The absence of its Golden Grace will be felt throughout the land far and wide.

Queen Marika's six divine offspring each claimed a shard of the Ring which imbued them with a maddening power. But this foul taint brought the Demigods only their ruin, sparking a bloody war between the royal siblings - The Shattering which laid waste to this land plunging it into chaos.

But now the Golden Grace of the Ring shines anew, guiding the once exiled Tarnished back to the Lands Between to restore what have been broken for so long, mend the Golden Order and claim the Elden Lordship promised to them by legend.
There was an error saving your submission.
Rate / catalog Rate / catalog another release
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Write review
Title
there are hugs in this one :D

edit: comes with a debuff :'(
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
IanCandido 2022-03-03T18:25:17Z
2022-03-03T18:25:17Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide
Title
spoilers, on endings
Elden Ring is staggering in breadth and detail, and like anything so big, gradually numbing. You want to slow it down, to see these new areas with the same sense of awe that accompanied every turn at the beginning, to press forward in fear of what may lie ahead. But a sense of forward momentum overtakes until it's irrepressible, and then the game is over. Increasingly difficult demigods appear in sequence to halt the flow, as a substitute for the rich environmental mysteries that had us forgetting there was an overall story in the first place. I'm thinking of how I never wanted to get through Stormveil, because that would mean I was done with Limgrave, and there was still so much to be learned in its fields and ravines and dead beaches. And then it was the same with Liurna. Altus Plateau was the last place I couldn't bear to leave, but even then Leyndell sits on the perimeter as a nagging reminder that things must end, and others must keep moving.

There are internal and external contributors to the persistent lapping of the call of progress here. As the player becomes more familiar with the game, they move more quickly through conflicts, and with the greater investment of player time comes the expectation of proportional narrative payoff. The detail of the here and now becomes a blur on the way to motivators on the horizon, and so Elden Ring like other games of its scale eventually becomes a virtual checklist. These factors are reflected internally, in the production of architecturally streamlined and graphically featureless maps that encourage forward momentum rather than the opportunity for getting lost. The player at a certain point either submits to the flow of the game and finishes it, or turns back and looks to rekindle their sense of wonder in the world behind them. The former is rewarded with quick and empty victory. The latter is also doomed, because by this point everything and everyone you ever cared about is devastated in progress’ wake. If the player follows this path they turn to complete the game with a heavy heart, having found the world robbed of meaning before it even closes.

Elden Ring knows that it is doing this, because the interplay of internal (terrestrial, world) and external (noumenal, Outer Gods) forces is the defining fixation of FromSoftware titles. Here it gives the progress narrative the form of the ‘Greater Will’, and stages a conflict between its adherents, and factions that wish to end the world as we know it. The Greater Will is that the player finishes Elden Ring, their character ascending to the Elden Throne, so that Elden Ring can begin again, forever. New Forsaken will continue to be summoned to the Lands Between to keep the cycle turning. That is why the delivery of the Greater Will is so empty. The paradox of narrative progress for the ending-oriented player is that any ending involving a throne is not an ending but a moment lost to the vastness of procedural eternal recurrence. Encountering the devoted Brother Corhyn and Goldmask across the Lands Between transforms the two into a chorus, commenting on the progression of the Greater Will. Corhyn initially holds Goldmask to be a prophet, but soon thinks him mad, complaining that his rituals “betray a suspicion of the holism of the Golden Order.” In truth, Goldmask realises the way of the Greater Will is to mend the ring and initiate its eternal cycle. This suspicion of Order is baked into its very belief system, leading adherents to hope the next cycle is exactly the same as this one.

Goldmask’s order is bound to the notion of apocalypse as revelation. (Apokalypsis means ‘unveiling’ or ‘revelation’, hence the Book of Revelation is the book of apocalypse). For the apocalypse to operate as revelation, it is not to arrive from forces elsewhere, but to have been set in place by entities that are already here. The revelation is both future-oriented and ancestral, and its event means the elimination of future and ancestry alike. There is perhaps no system more apocalyptic than the game system — every ending is already present in the game text but hidden within the code, and all that needs to happen is for the apocalyptic event to be revealed in play. In Elden Ring’s late-game revelation, Goldmask discovers what was already there, Goldmask recognises the corruption of the Order, Goldmask waits for the flames, Goldmask mends the ring so it can happen all over again. The apocalypticism of the Golden Order is, paradoxically, eternal stasis. Everything returns to the beginning so that the Forsaken can arise once more and fulfil the Greater Will. For all the flames and tears and wreckage it is an Order without change or difference.

On the other hand, many in the Lands Between hold a contempt for predestination and dedicate their lives to overthrowing the eternal recurrence of dysfunctional Order. There is a lateral (rather than linear) progression to many of the minor quests, in particular those given by Ranni. The theme and shape of these quests is the fate of stars and gravity, as opposed to the main narrative’s rigid iconography of thrones, crowns, and bloodlines. Ranni actively sends you against the current, mapping out a constellation atop familiar places that now appear strange, and exposing undead cities beneath your feet. This is not done in the service of ‘uncovering’ a living, breathing world, but its opposite: the true undeath of the Lands Between. There’s a madness to Ranni’s story, and that’s because it wants to tell you that you have already been here, many times before, under different names and at different times. Everybody has already died and come back. The fates of everyone you care about have accompanied and in fact defined them since before you even knew them, and so all of your action in the Lands Between has been for the deliverance of their microscopic tragedy. Thops will always arrive too late, Irina will always have to wait too long, Millicent will always live diseased, Latenna will always curl up beside her sister in the snow.

The revelation of Ranni’s story is not the arrival of all of the pieces that were already there from the last reset, but that the world was already lost and empty. Travelling across the Lands Between on her apocalyptic mission severs rather than traces the golden contours of the world shaped like a furled finger. She wants to find the man who stole the stars so the moon comes back and the tides with it. Rejecting the dysfunctional order of the past, we now seek things born of nothingness, to realise the possibility of eliminating the eternal ‘now’ that was never present any way. And so we turn our backs to the stars and march ahead, to end things once again. There is an ending with believing in, and it’s the one that never eventuates. It’s the one born in the coldest night imaginable. Are you ready to commit a cardinal sin?
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
nostalghia 2022-05-08T04:48:17Z
2022-05-08T04:48:17Z
4.5
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide
Title
Elden Ring is the newest entry in the genre of modern AAA open world games that immediately upon release received the highest critical praise imaginable. Many claim this game to be a pure manifestation of adventure, a crowning achievement in modern open world games. I don’t count myself among those people, but I am also not particularly interested in only stating that I disagree with that sentiment. What I find much more fascinating is questioning why open world games, or more specifically in this case, Elden Ring manages to be an incredibly immersive experience to some, yet for a small minority seems to unfortunately fall flat on its face.
So, let me first try to define what I see as the modern open world problem by going on a probably unnecessarily long excursion and go from there.

To me, the modern expectations for open worlds seem still too far ahead of their time. With teams regularly having to crunch intensively to meet unrealistic goals, it is unreasonable to believe that current day developers have the resources and tools to present quality content consistently across a massive playground. If you tell a team to create vast amounts of content while simultaneously having to connect all that content coherently within the same world, all the while gaining maybe just a couple of years of additional time for development compared to non-open-world releases, you simply have to accept that compromises will probably have to be made.
As a fitting example, Dark souls III was allocated roughly three years of development time. Elden Ring only received two additional years on top of those three years. Hell, Sekiro was even developed during the creation of Elden Ring. But somehow there’s now roughly three times the amount of content than in Dark Souls III? This discrepancy in the amount of content versus the time spent making said content should already be enough to make a case for compromises arising from being this ambitious.

The most common compromise found in open world games is that the organic creation of the world is left in favor of following a theme-park-like pattern to meet the scope of the massive world.
Commonly, developers create blocks of content, space them out among a level plane, then fill the empty spaces between these blocks and add in verticality in order to create the feeling that you are indeed in an open, living world. The bigger the desired world, the less time can be spent individually on each content block, encouraging content blocks to follow similar, repetitive designs that can be mass pasted onto the world in order to fit the desired size of the world.
Furthermore, spending time on elevating the quality of the environments between the blocks of content also in turn leaves the developer with even less time to improve the content blocks themselves. Of course the exact methodology will vary based on the developer, some choosing to focus on creating the environment first and then adding in the blocks of contents and so on, but the general approach seems to be reducible to a very formulaic, instantly recognizable pattern.
Since open worlds are expected to be absolutely massive, developers are left with an unbearable balancing act where there’s never truly enough time to make each aspect of the open world shine without lowering something else in quality in the process.
The desired modern open world simply can't offer high quality all across the board given the expectations, while a realistic high quality open world would not have the desired size that is expected of a modern open world.

This predicament seems to leave all modern open world games with a simple goal: to create the illusion of an immersive world. It doesn’t really matter whether content is mass produced or placed in inorganic ways in the world when the player might not even notice those patterns in the first place, right? If you feel immersed in a world, despite it technically being quite formulaic if you were to look at the world from a clinical perspective, then it seems like that’s all that matters.

I’m not really sure if illusions are a good or bad thing. They seem to provide incredibly powerful experiences if you are successfully ensnared by the illusion, but if you notice the deception happening, then the whole game could possibly be ruined for you. This is where the discussion has to be linked back to Elden Ring, since this seems to be the crux of the matter as to why Elden Ring’s open world failed for me, yet worked for most.
The game does its absolute best at trying to make you feel like you’re walking around in the best open world created so far. There are completely breathtaking vistas of locations found positively everywhere. Practically every location that each vista invites you to explore does in fact become explorable at some point in the game. You have certain locations (called legacy dungeons) that rival the best From Software locations in sheer quality. Areas such as Stormveil Castle, Leyndell and Crumbling Farum Azula are without a doubt peerless in scope and beauty. And yet, the rest of the game falls down the same rabbit hole as every other modern open world. There is a huge amount of reused content, used sometimes so shamelessly that many prior powerful moments become retroactively ruined. When you’re not exploring a block of content you’ll be riding with your horse through vastly empty areas until you find the next thing to do. Almost every single optional block of content that isn’t a legacy dungeon follows a set, highly repetitive pattern.

Since so far I’ve written in relatively broad terms I’ll finally become specific. Apart from the legacy dungeons, Elden Ring offers only a handful of different types of blocks of content that are generously repeated throughout the lands, those being:
A) secluded areas that are of high enough quality to be similar to legacy dungeons, but are of much smaller size comparatively, like Castle Morne or The Shaded Castle.
B) side dungeons that are non-randomized versions of the chalice dungeons in Bloodborne, usually offering menial adventuring with highly repeated enemies, bosses and sections.
C) ruins with nothing more than a treasure chest room that sometimes has a reused boss preceding it.
D) sorcerer towers that contain a reward locked behind insultingly low effort puzzles.
E) minor erdtrees with a single residing boss that you will see roughly a dozen times.
F) enemy camps that contain, well enemies. And, with luck, an item.
G) “roaming” bosses such as dragons that are repeated to an absurd degree.
H) walking mausoleums that really aren’t even worth mentioning.

Out of all of those, only A) seems like adequate filler for the rest of the world. But no, it has to share its space with its seven other types of neglected siblings, desperately clinging for your attention.
It seems impossible to me to be truly immersed in a world in which every optional block of content sticks out so painfully obvious in its repetition and crude implementation. Realizing that every side dungeon is placed seemingly randomly into meaningless cliffs, that every ruin is a shuffle of the exact same assets, that the dragon bosses were so poorly implemented into their respective areas that they will de- and respawn multiple times throughout a fight, that the density of content of each major area drops further the more you progress in the game, that there’s simply so much empty dead space between content blocks just feels to me like slipping and falling on your face every time you are trying to immerse yourself in this open world.

And yet, for most this doesn’t matter in the slightest. Many would probably even agree that there’s a lot of stuff in the open world of Elden Ring that simply isn’t that great, and still it does not matter. The open world illusion seems to get upheld by some immensely powerful individual moments that you find while playing the game. Like the sheer wonder felt when you explore the completely optional area called Nokron, only to then find the second Hallowhorn Grounds, ending into Siofra Aqueduct and thinking it's over but no, it continues to the Deeproot Depths and then after that you somehow still find a new area called Nokstella, that then leads into a new area called the Lake Of Rot, that then finally culminates in a secret boss fight making you think this side journey's over but no, if you continue the side quest that lead you to these areas to begin with you will then unbelievably unlock another final new hidden area.
I get the feeling. Even with all the low quality padding mixed into the world there are a couple of magical moments to be found. But even with that incredible experience I just described I had to leave out the fact that at least four of these areas are in fact incredibly similar to each other, while not even coming close to reaching the quality of the legacy dungeons (and that secret boss gets reused later on for some reason) – once again potentially ruining this whole side journey if you dare stare past the illusion.

For me, these moments just weren’t enough to carry the open world experience on their back, but I can understand if for some they were. It’s just that when the veil of the illusion gets dropped there are objectives that every open world has to achieve for me. That I am truly exploring a world that exists the way that it does organically and not because this was simply the most comfortable way for the developers to make this world in a tight time window. That every area receives the same attention to detail instead of continuously dropping more and more in content and quality as the game approaches its end.
Maybe I have unrealistic expectations for open world games, but it seems to me like any open world game that isn't immediately comparable to the obviously awful Ubisoft-style open world games is already instantaneously considered an open world masterpiece, when in reality, these games are still far from achieving what they set out do, even if they admittedly do it a bit better than the current competition.
I can acknowledge the occasionally great thing that Elden Ring’s world achieves, but immersion just seems like a very fleeting thing to me. Let the game slip up one too many times and it becomes exceedingly hard to return to it.

To pile on top of all this, the combination of open world design with souls-like gameplay devalues a lot of what the open world is trying to achieve in the first place, especially given how little From Software cared to adjust their gameplay systems established in previous games. Specifically, there are three core problems that I have been able to recognize so far.
1. The god damn horse
Adding a horse in a game series that has always struggled with incentivizing players to engage with enemies means you can now effectively skip all content found in the open world where the horse is allowed to be used. This means that the majority of your time in the open world is spent frantically riding around every corner looking for an item to quickly pick up before any enemy can react, then casually moving on. The meager rune rewards wouldn’t make the enemies worth engaging with to begin with though.
2.Overleveling
Leveling and weapon upgrades have always been the most impactful changes you could make to your character in Souls games. It is also now one of the best ways (the best one will come up later) to accidentally trivialize the vast majority of the content this time around. Even just by mistake doing one later-game area too early might result in you struggling to find any challenges until the endgame. When most of the enjoyment from the more low quality side content results from you overcoming challenges with your designated build, then having fixed levels for enemies is probably not a good idea.
3. Meaningless rewards for exploration
Almost all of the impactful items you can find through exploration are weapons and ashes of war (weapon skills that can be freely attached to weapons). You can theoretically upgrade 21 weapons to their maximum. In practice however, this is way too tedious to be something that most people will reasonably do, especially because you’ll have to respec your character every time you make more drastic changes to your build. Therefore, a typical playthrough will have you probably committing to only a couple weapons/spells, rendering all of the optional areas that don’t require items for your build somewhat useless. Perhaps removing leveling and upgrading like Sekiro did would’ve been a great way to incentivize you to use everything that you find (similar to what the ashes of war are already kind of doing), but I realize that that kind of goes against the whole RPG thing.

As a final point, it seems to me that the decision to go open world has also made From Software not able to put in enough effort into its combat this time around, showcasing probably some of the most obviously flawed game design I’ve seen from such a talented company. While the combat is effectively the same as in the other Souls games, there is something that seems completely off about it.
It looks and sounds great, feels relatively smooth and has an acceptable amount of options for endgame builds. The invisible posture meter for enemies, jumps/jumping attacks and guard counters aren’t particularly impactful but somewhat welcome additions nonetheless.
Once again gaining access to weapon skills that can be freely switched between your non-legendary weapons seems to further promote build variety, although most skills seem to only be glorified flashy looking R2 strong attacks with varying degrees of posture damage and status buildups. This, however, remains to be something to be tested over many playthroughs.
I suppose there’s also horse combat, but it is so severely undercooked and underutilized within most encounters that it doesn’t end up making any real impact on the combat as a whole. There are many encounters that seem like they were designed around the horse, but were then apparently decided not to have it included after all, possibly because the horse lacks any mechanical depth and was deemed too unfinished to use before the release of the game. The boss fights that do include the horse usually end up with you making circles around the toes of the boss, continuously forcing them to do easily avoidable stomp attacks until they die.
All in all, the good old press-the-invincibility-button-in-rhythm-with-visual-and-auditory-ques-and-then-sometimes-punish-principle is still in place with no real variation whatsoever, leaving a solid, albeit unimaginative feeling combat system extremely reminiscent of what you’d find in every other Souls game.

Yet, the enemy design seems to be a baffling parody of previous Souls games. Almost every enemy and boss has very long combos, minimal or nonexistent recovery times and high damage. Many animations are comically artificially drawn out to bait out early inputs. Most attacks are unreasonably hard or outright impossible to react to. Input reading is in its most blatant state yet, causing bosses to finish combos, only to then input read your punish and inexplicably punish you instead for whatever reason. All these design decisions synergize in such a way where memorization and passivity are immensely promoted – or at the very least if you intend to actually engage with the core combat mechanics.

This gets worse and worse the further you progress in the game, although you can see the same glimpses in even early game bosses such as Margit. While I wouldn’t say that exploring endgame areas is as infuriating as it’s often made out to be, since by then you’ll probably be immensely powerful and most normal enemies retain relatively low health, the later-game bosses certainly feel irredeemable in their mechanical design.
I simply do not understand why every boss has to be designed in such a way where your time gets maximally wasted. Every previous Souls game understood that while the boss fights are certainly one of the main draws of the overall experience, they have to be carefully balanced in such a way where they don’t feel like pushovers, while at the same also not overstaying their welcome by forcing you to over-memorize every single animation that the bosses can do.
Since these games have also never been particularly mechanically deep in the first place, the best case scenario is creating boss fights that feel, sound and look engaging and challenging( even if mechanically they really aren’t) so that you forget that really all you’re doing is pressing an invincibility button at certain memorized times.
However, when the balance gets skewed in favor of tedious memorization, the whole combat system of these games just kind of falls apart. You are never allowed to get in that vigorous flow state where you are relying on your instincts, avoiding certain attacks correctly on the fly since they give you enough visual information to react the way it was intended, punishing when it simply feels right to do, and of course also occasionally hiccuping when the boss presents you with interesting tricks up their sleeve. Instead, like in Elden Ring, you are made painfully aware that you are offered nothing more interesting to do than guessing and memorizing roll and punish timings for obscure animations until you finally get them right and get to move on to the next area. Even the across the board once again fantastic aesthetic designs of the bosses weren’t enough to distract me from these issues.
I want to make it clear that I am not complaining about the game being too difficult, in fact every boss is certainly doable even with severe player-imposed challenges. The issue is rather that the process of learning and then beating many bosses is just not very fun this time around.
There’s just so much guessing going on every fight – how long will an attack be artificially delayed? Will that combo consist of three or rather thirty attacks? Is that multi-hit attack even dodgeable? When am I allowed to press the heal button without getting immediately sniped by an attack? When can I finally safely punish something?
You’ll get the answers to your questions eventually, but not without getting severely punished for every time you ask. Why wouldn’t you then just stay back to keep out of range of those ridiculous combos? Why try punishing anything but the slowest attacks that take longest to recover? Why not just use ranged attacks to never be put into the insane blender that almost every major boss is? There’s just no reason not to play very passive and barely engage with the bosses if you don’t fancy being overwhelmed by tedious memorization.
The balance is just totally off here for me – instead of having a healthy mix of some memorization but also the utilization of your reaction time and intuition to create the illusion of exhilarating, close call encounters, you get the awfully bloated mess that the boss fights in Elden Ring often are. Memorization should only serve as a sort of countdown that ensures you will beat a boss over time if you simply keep at it – it instead being so far at the forefront of the boss design just shows a total lack of understanding as to why the boss fights in the previous games managed to feel engaging in the first place.
Maybe I’m in the minority here though; I can definitely imagine people preferring this new way of designing bosses, since for some the memorization of complete movesets and then finally almost perfectly overcoming bosses is the most satisfying aspect of Souls combat. Making them memorize even more and for much longer should in theory just make this satisfaction even stronger when they finally beat a boss.
However, my preference for boss fights that are fast paced, close call tumbles in which I have to rely on my instincts, as well as my love for mastering a combat system and then being massively rewarded for it (like in Sekiro) just aren’t things that Elden Ring provides at all, which makes the combat feel truly awful for me.

I also realize that it might’ve proven a real challenge for From Software to balance all these encounters while knowing that the player can become immensely strong from exploring the open world and overleveling, but then this just seems like another argument against using the modern open world design philosophy in a Souls game. You could surely say that the overleveling helps in counteracting the problematic aspects of most bosses, but then, as previously mentioned, the fights usually just become so easy that they feel completely impactless anyways (apart from maybe two or three boss fights in the endgame, where overleveling seems to have little to no impact).

Of course, I haven’t mentioned spirit ash summons yet, which are very similar to the NPC summons found in the previous games. If you are inclined to use them, all of these problems are simply washed away, since you are no longer required to engage with the gameplay mechanics to begin with. Pair that with all the insanely powerful ashes of wars and spells and you are effectively able to steamroll everything. As a power fantasy this kind of works, but even if now all of the mechanical issues are technically somewhat solved, what is really even left of the combat in the first place? I’m not exactly against an “easy mode”, but if it is designed in such an unengaging way, then I don’t just understand the appeal.
You could even argue that summons aren’t the easy mode of this game to begin with, but rather an almost mandatory thing you have to engage with, since so many bosses seem to almost be designed around them. Otherwise I could not explain the messy state that most bosses find themselves in, especially Malenia, Godskin Duo (and every multi-bossfight for that matter) and the final boss being prime examples.
Also, considering that one of the most major flaws of the souls combat formula has always been that fights with multiple enemies or allies simply do not function in the first place, the supposed focus on summons becomes even more bizarre.
Some of the only multi boss fights that ever kind of worked, like Ornstein & Smough, only did so because they were specifically designed to be practically 1v1s regardless.
Likewise, using a summoned ally just breaks the aggro priority for every boss, once again only kind of working when you are fighting two bosses to begin with, where your ally can then focus one boss while you fight the other – but this really just creates another practically 1v1 situation.
From Softwares decision to not only add widely available, easily upgradable summons but also seemingly focus the combat encounters on them with zero adjustments to the AI was completely misguided. You’re put in a damned if you, damned if you don’t situation, where not using summons forces you to both engage with the combat but also with the across the board unejoyable bosses, whereas using summons fixes those encounters but then in turn just makes the whole combat experience feel completely hollow.

I am unsure what went wrong here. To make a game like Sekiro that managed to make such a refreshing feeling and criminally enjoyable combat system with minimal, but ingenious changes to the core systems of the Souls combat formula and then somehow arrive next at Elden Ring is just really confusing. My best bet would once again be that this was caused by all the challenges arising from having to create a massive open world and the lack of development time that they likely caused, but who truly knows.
A common theory is of course that Miyazaki’s intention was to frustrate and once again newly challenge veteran Souls players by punishing them for playing Elden Ring like they would have previous games, but this just wouldn’t seem like a worthy trade-off, considering how contradictory the boss fights and many normal combat encounters really end up feeling in their designs.
Instead, it feels more like there is a distinct lack of intention for all these design decisions to begin with, heavily reminding me of the way playing Dark Souls II felt like.

Another very similar, but often used argument is that Elden Ring isn’t a traditional Souls game and should therefore not be played and treated like previous titles, but this just seems ridiculous to me. Apart from the massive open world, there is not a single new addition in this game. Everything else is a complete reuse of the Souls formula with no worthy innovations. The combat, the “story” and the level design show no mentionable jump from even Demon Souls. Even the best content of this game, the legacy dungeons, lack any noteworthy movements toward new territory for From Software. How am I supposed to then not treat this game as anything other than Dark Souls IV if the open world fell flat for me? When even the narrative aspect of this game amounts to only a bit of familiar feeling lore and mildly charming side quests that you’ll probably never even finish without a guide I just fail to see what else I’m even meant to focus on.
I just really hope they don’t follow their next game in the footsteps of Elden Ring, even if I’m happy that for many people this game managed to be an incredibly memorable open world experience. I just wish I could’ve experienced that too.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
cuccster 2022-03-12T16:18:55Z
2022-03-12T16:18:55Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
review
en
Expand review Hide
Title
Que faire de ces ambitions insensées ?
Quand Elden Ring a vu sa date de sortie (enfin !) officiellement fixée sur une date, j'ai prévenu mon entourage que j'allais devenir une bête d'intérieur pendant quelques semaines, préparé à ce que ce jeu devienne ma vie. Fan du studio depuis Dark Souls, ça allait être cependant la première fois que j'allais jouer à l'un de leur jeu au moment de sa sortie. Sans parler du fait que cet opus bénéficiait de la plus grosse hype jamais vue sur un de leurs jeux. Les retours de la bêta & des testeurs étaient extatiques, a priori aucun risque au moment de sortir la carte bleue. Elden Ring est, de fait, devenu ma vie pendant un bon gros mois, avec un premier playthrough achevé au bout de plus de 160h – il faut bien cela pour rencontrer la quasi totalité du contenu (j'ai raté quelques trucs mineurs mais l'essentiel est là), en prenant son temps et en se laissant pénétrer par l'impressionnante richesse de ce territoire et son histoire fragmentée.

Et donc me voilà aujourd'hui à rédiger une critique du jeu qui se concentre essentiellement sur les points négatifs. Parce qu'après avoir réglé son compte à l'ultime boss, je n'ai pas vraiment envie de causer d'autre chose. Les points positifs d'Elden Ring, tout le monde en a parlé et en parle encore, et je suis souvent d'accord. Nombre d'entre eux sont de toute manière liés à la philosophie qui traverse les projets de Hidetaka Miyazaki depuis Demon's Souls ; narration riche mais environnementale et dissimulée, excellentes sensations de jeu grâce au poids du personnage et des coups qu'il donne et reçoit, excellente direction artistique, incitation à la patience et gratification de cette patience, apprentissage dur mais juste... D'autres mentionnent la qualité de l'open-world en contraste au lot Ubisoftien sans saveur habituel, ce qui n'est pas faux non plus même si c'est une discussion qui m'importe assez peu... Je connais largement mieux les jeux FromSoft qu'aucun jeu Ubisoft donc j'aime autant comparer Elden Ring à ses prédecesseurs et comprendre ce qui fonctionne et ne fonctionne pas dans leurs innovations. Ce n'est pas pour le plaisir d'être une voix de contradiction que je vais me concentrer sur ce qui m'a dérangé mais plutôt : d'une part parce que la plupart de ces défauts sont concentrés sur le dernier quart du jeu et donc quand ça fait une quarantaine d'heure qu'on se farcit la présence de plus en plus étouffante de ces faiblesses il devient difficile d'avoir l'envie de rabâcher ses forces ; d'autre part parce que je peine à voir ces critiques proprement développées dans le paysage médiatique (beaucoup de « critiques » négatives se bornent à trouver le jeu simplement trop dur ou trop cryptique) et qu'il me semble important qu'elles soient entendues si l'on veut que tous les suiveurs qui s'en inspireront immanquablement retiennent le bon et évitent le mauvais. Sans parler de FromSoft eux-mêmes, qui n'auront aucune raison de rectifier leur trajectoire s'ils ne reçoivent que des louanges uniformes (même si celles-ci sont en bonne partie méritées).


Un jeu étalé sur trois tartines

Il faut rendre à Radagon ce qui appartient à Marika : un jeu qui parvient à tant obséder sur une si longue durée c'est rare. Les jeux contemporains de From Software ont cette capacité à fasciner – et surtout à nourrir cette fascination de A à Z. Est-ce à dire qu'ils sont uniformément parfaits et que le déroulement d'un playthrough se déroule sans anicroche, non bien sûr, mais les moments de mou finissaient par être raccrochés par d'autres phases merveilleuses ou terrifiantes. Pendant, disons les 50 premières heures d'Elden Ring, je n'étais que fascination. Emerveillement de la découverte, de la structure de cet open world qui avait compris les leçons de la topographie et de la verticalité, qui savait créer du large en sachant comment le remplir, donner l'impression que rien n'a été laissé au hasard et a été fait main, amoureusement. Emerveillement également des – vrais – donjons. Voilorage et Raya Lucaria laissent une impression exceptionnelle. Je me suis dit que Voilorage en particulier était le meilleur niveau jamais réalisé par la Miyazaki team – c'était avant de faire la rencontre de Leyndell. Un open world excitant à parcourir, qui récompense même la pulsion exploratoire la plus obsessionnelle, et qui parvient à intégrer de manière organique dans sa carte des donjons gigantesques et au design intérieur rigoureux. Un open world qui parvient à dissimuler régulièrement sa taille réelle, avant de dévoiler une grande extrapolation au Nord et puis au Nord-Est ainsi que des phases souterraines béantes qui sont à mi-chemin entre de l'open world et du donjon.

Ouais, Elden Ring est grand. Ou plutôt je devrais dire qu'il est étendu. Très, très étendu. La surface à parcourir est colossale, et si vous trouvez que 160h de jeu c'est beaucoup prenez en compte le fait que j'ai commencé à me lasser sur la fin et que j'ai assez peu exploré les deux dernières zones de jeu (qui pour être honnête m'ont semblé assez vide, ça ne m'étonnerait pas que je sois passé à côté d'une toute petite quantité de contenu). Ce qui apparaît au premier abord comme une qualité – imaginez, 50h de bonheur et on te fait comprendre que tu es encore loin de la moitié, joie! – devient tranquillement le plus gros défaut du jeu. Non que sa taille effective soit si cruciale, mais quand on prend les choses qui grattent, et qui grattent de plus en plus à mesure qu'on avance dans le jeu, qu'on les rassemble ; on se rend compte qu'elles pointent presque toutes dans une même direction.

Le recyclage des mobs et des boss est une plaie ? Il fallait bien remplir cette map gigantesque.
Les deux dernières zones de l'openworld sont intensément vides ? L'équilibrage de la difficulté est mal fichu sur la deuxième moitié du jeu ? Ça sent le rush à plein nez.

FromSoft n'a pas manqué d'ambition. Au contraire, ce dont ils ont manqué c'est de moyens pour pleinement réaliser ces (foolish) ambitions. Quand on commence un jeu avec une zone aussi incroyablement réussie que Nécrolimbe, où chaque caillou est pensé pour éduquer le joueur à faire face à la suite (la Sentinelle apprend qu'il vaut mieux devenir fort avant de faire le mariole, Agheel apprend le combat à cheval, le Creuset idéalement apprend la parade mais il apprend aussi très bien à rouler et à punir la gourmandise, Margit apprend que la zone de départ est vraiment top moumoute alors ce serait dommage que tu viennes te faire empaler par mon bâton avant d'avoir tout visité et gagné 25 niveaux bichette, merci), après une telle zone donc il devient facile de tout mesurer à son aune. Et se dire qu'en fin de compte :

- la Liurna c'était super mais sans doute trop vaste et chargé ;
Altus c'est magnifique (sérieusement l'une des zones les plus belles de l'histoire du jeu vidéo et je ne parle même pas de Leyndell) mais en fin de compte assez plat ;
- Caelid impressionne lorsqu'on y est confronté en début de jeu mais des zones « accessibles dès le début » c'est largement la zone la plus vide en contenu – et même si je suis un fan absolu de la mise en scène du festival de Radahn, le château vacant, les chants solennels qui résonnent et la préparation de l'épique confrontation, il n'empêche que l'absence de réel donjon lui est très dommageable (le retour au château après le festival est une déception et la cité de Sellia est assez agaçante à explorer avec un level design médiocre) ;
- le Mont Gelmir offre une exploration très verticale et resserrée, plus linéaire à sa façon mais en contraste à Liurna et Altus c'est très bienvenu et agréable, en revanche le contenu y est plus pauvre qu'ailleurs et déjà très recyclé ;
- la cîme des Géants me fait penser à Gelmir en combinant exploration resserrée et verticale mais avec un gros vide de contenu (et un recyclage + un pic de difficulté mal géré mais ça c'est encore une autre question) ;
- quant aux terres gelées en contrebas dont le nom m'échappe sincèrement, il s'agit de la zone la plus vide du jeu et la plus horizontale sans conteste – même si elle ne manque pas de charme (mais ça n'est jamais le problème, Elden Ring est beau à peu près tout le temps).
- je ne parle pas de la péninsule car ça me semble difficile de ne pas la considérer simplement comme une portion Sud de Nécrolimbe, elle n'a pas de réel donjon mais plein d'éléments chouettes qui complètement ladite Nécrolimbe.
- finalement les zones sous-terraines sont parmi les meilleures du jeu, et pourtant elles sont resserrées, plus linéaires, et séparées les unes des autres ainsi que de la surface (on peut aller d'endroit en endroit sans se téléporter, mais le transport s'y fait soit par le biais d'une cinématique soit par un long ascenseur ce qui est presque pareil), tiens tiens...

Alors attention, quand je parle de « vide » je parle plutôt d'un sentiment pernicieux qui s'installe petit à petit alors qu'on commence à tomber sur des mobs recyclés, des catacombes et grottes qui se suivent et se ressemblent, des tours de mage aux énigmes inégales et au loot redondant... Car Elden Ring est dense et l'hostilité extrême du monde ne permet pas de parler de vide au sens où l'on s'y promène sans rien voir ni rien rencontrer. Il y aura toujours des embûches desquelles se méfier, mais le vide apparaît lorsque le sens de l'exploration vient à manquer. Le jeu manque sans doute, d'ailleurs, de ce vide propre à l'errance qui permet de respirer un coup et donner aux moments de tension toute leur intensité par contraste. Il semble qu'Elden Ring a voulu mettre au joueur la même pression au mètre carré que ses grands frères non-open world, malgré sa surface considérablement plus étendue. Et de ce fait c'est un jeu rempli – mais rempli de quoi ? De choses dont hélas on finit par se lasser à mesure qu'on avance de zone en zone. FromSoft ne manquent pas de ressources mais il était impossible à l'échelle d'un seul jeu de disposer sur une map de cette taille des ennemis sans cesse nouveaux et des mini-donjons constamment intéressants. Les 3 dernières zones du jeu cumulées ne présentent que deux ennemis nouveaux – et encore les homme-bêtes de Farum Azula ont déjà été rencontrés si l'on a visité le Beffroi des Terres Croulantes ; le reste c'est du reskin qui tape plus fort. Et au delà de la lassitude de retomber sur les mêmes adversaires, de l'émerveillement qui prend du plomb dans l'aile, ce problème de recyclage entache l'illusion du sentiment de progression du joueur. On triomphe de demi-dieux pour se faire one shot par le même corbac que celui de Caelid, cette fois ses stats sont mal équilibrées et il est peinturluré de sang ou de givre. C'est encore pire pour les chevaliers d'Elphaël, qui ont certes un moveset légèrement augmenté mais sont surtout rendus infâmes à cause d'une quantité de PV invraisemblable. Tout cela incite à ne pas respecter le contenu et à tracer pour mieux avancer. Elden Ring m'a épuisé bien avant sa fin de jeu, là où aucun des prédécesseurs - même DS2 n'avait coupé mon envie de jeu.

Quand je pense aux Demon's Souls, Dark Souls, Bloodborne et Sekiro, tous les jeux de Hidetaka Miyazaki sculptent nombre de situations uniques qui marquent – après avoir fini le jeu on peut encore dire « purée quand on voit Anor Londo », « fichtre la première rencontre avec le Chevalier de la Tour », « mazette la Danseuse », « attends pourquoi y a une deuxième barre de vie qui vient d'apparaître là », « pourquoi le ciel il est devenu violet avec une grande lune rouge ? », « grand Dieux cette truite géante vient-elle de me bouffer ? ». C'est que ces jeux sont de grands jeux de mise en scène. Même quand la série s'est mise à se linéariser, ne pouvant répéter le génie topographique de Dark Souls premier du nom, le resserrement de la progression permettait de bien doser les moments de waouh, les moments de brrr, les moments de snif ainsi que les moments de « ... ». Cette mise en scène est importante car au fond dans ces jeux la seule manière d'interagir avec le monde c'est en se battant. Or le système de combat n'est pas très élaboré, on en reparlera plus tard. On peut aussi choper du loot et même s'il ne nous servira jamais sa description détaillée nous donnera des indices pour mieux comprendre le monde dans lequel nous évoluons. Mais en dehors des dialogues avec des PNJs c'est là toute l'étendue de nos actions, ou « activités » dans ces jeux ; pas de gameplay émergent. Alors il faut que cette mise en scène taillée sur mesure puisse se déployer d'une certaine manière, sinon une partie du charme est perdu. J'en reviens donc à Elden Ring, qui est si grand le pauvre, qu'à moins d'avoir eu 3 fois plus de main d'œuvre il aurait été impossible de donner pareille expérience narrative à un open world. Ce que ça implique pour le jeu c'est déjà des quêtes de PNJ d'autant plus complexes à avancer, car il faut régulièrement deviner où le gus va se téléporter (heureusement que la map a un marqueur de PNJ) et que c'est d'autant plus dur dans un terrain si vaste et ouvert. En l'occurrence ça ne m'a pas trop dérangé car je me suis tellement donné spécifiquement sur ce jeu, sans documentation, que j'ai pu boucler certaines quêtes sans aide, ce qui s'est avéré très gratifiant – mais ça peut être un problème pour d'autres personnes qui n'auront peut-être pas eu autant de chance que moi. Mais le réel problème vient avec le recyclage des mini-donjons et des ennemis. J'aurais aimé, après la fin du jeu, me dire « ah punaise, quand Agheel tombe du ciel dans Nécrolimbe et que je me suis fait cramer la tronche ». Mais c'est faux. Cet événement est arrivé, je le sais, mais impossible de me rappeler de l'émerveillement ressenti car ce sentiment s'est émoussé à chaque nouvelle rencontre avec un autre dragon d'open world avec le même gameplay. Pareil pour les corbeaux, qui sont des sacrés machines à foutre des cauchemars quand on les rencontre pour la première fois dans Caelid, à cheval, à essayer de se barrer le plus vite possible parce qu'un coffre-surprise nous a emmené en territoire hostile et -oh shit ils vont aussi vite que moi à cheval ?! Sauf qu'on les recroise en reskin à 2 deux autres endroits. Pareil pour pas mal de catacombes qui ont de temps en temps un concept sympa mais qui est forcément répliqué ailleurs (au moins les catacombes late game sont de mieux en mieux pensées, mais la lassitude demeure). Et c'est le problème avec Elden Ring : dans la longueur, au nom du remplissage, l'émerveillement est rétroactivement effacé par l'instauration de la routine. La plupart des moments singuliers et précieux sont rabâchés. Au bout d'un certain nombre d'heures de jeu, Elden Ring ne crée plus de souvenirs, il manufacture de l'oubli.

Alors ouais il a bien fallu remplir tout ça. Et le remplir d'autant plus – sans doute – que se déployait la peur d'être dépassé par la tâche et le temps : pour compenser. Je ne veux pas trop prétendre me mettre à la place de la team, mais si l'on pense aux jeux précédents on se souviendra particulièrement de l'un d'entre eux qui a eu un développement compliqué et des délais trop durs à tenir et qui a fait le choix d'accroître sa difficulté en coinçant le joueur dans des troupeaux d'ennemis. Je ne connais rien du développement d'Elden Ring, au contraire de celui de Dark Souls 2, mais la multiplication du nombre d'ennemis dans les donjons endgame (Elphaël donjon de tous les abus, chouette architecture mais des armées de soldats partout, un rez-de-chaussée jonché des pires ennemis du jeu (clairement faits pour être affrontés avec les outils de Sekiro), 2 arbres-avatars dont 1 entouré d'une troupe, j'en passe...) et même celle des boss qui dès Caelid et Altus se mettent à prendre leur revanche en nous attaquant à deux (voire à trois). C'est très facile de rendre un jeu dur de cette manière – mais Miyazaki a-t-il oublié que sa série de jeux était optimisée pour le combat 1 contre 1 ? Ce n'est même pas un manque de savoir faire, car en dehors de Ornstein & Smough – qui ont quelques soucis mais ont globalement une bonne synergie – Dark Souls 3 nous offrait sans doute les meilleurs combats double boss de la série en la présence des démons de la Cité enclavée et de Frieda & Papa chaudron. Combats imités mais clairement jamais égalé (le duo de gargouilles de l'aqueduc qui semblait plein de bonnes intentions mais foire à cause d'un équilibrage calamiteux – heureusement que l'arène permet de gruger un peu). Et à côté de ça on se tape deux putains de Creusets dans une tombe, trois crystaliens au fond d'une grotte et pire encore deux cons d'apôtres sanctechair OBLIGATOIRES, me laissant un sale souvenir de ces mobs alors que pris individuellement ils sont géniaux... En dehors des Crystaliens, et encore, ces duos n'ont souvent rien de complémentaire, il s'agit juste de deux ennemis qui viendront vous aggro aveuglement, indépendamment du comportement de leur copain. Une situation proprement injuste pour le joueur qui devra rivaliser de chance – ou de niveaux en trop – pour gratter un triomphe amer.

Contrairement à Dark Souls 2, Elden Ring fait l'effort d'introduire une nouvelle mécanique bien pratique pour qui en aurait marre de certains choix de design merdiques : les invocations. Et c'est vrai qu'on peut les considérer comme un modulateur de difficulté comme un autre, plus malin que les invocations d'autres joueurs car ils ne démultiplient pas la vie du boss. Mais en l'état cette mécanique permet surtout de montrer que l'IA des ennemis est aussi adaptée à affronter plusieurs ennemis que nous-mêmes le sommes avec les outils à notre disposition. Très honnêtement, pour avoir épisodiquement utilisé les invocations pour certains combats insupportables, ça ne fait pas des combats très fun - ça n'est que mon ressenti. C'est sûr que c'est mieux que rien, mais j'ai une petite voix malicieuse qui ne peut s'empêcher de me souffler à l'oreille que l'existence des invocations a pu justement pousser FromSoft à se décomplexer dans l'absurdité de certains combats.

Mais je commence doucement à glisser vers mon deuxième cahier de doléances alors je m'arrêterai là pour le moment, au sujet des boss.

Enfin pour résumer cette première moitié de critique ; tout ça me semble être au fond une question de dosage, et traduit un rush qui a tué l'équilibrage des dernières zones et empêché sans doute d'ajuster le mid-game – qui lui est beaucoup trop facile si le joueur explore de manière soutenue le contenu qui est à sa disposition. Beaucoup de défauts pointés jusqu'à présent n'auraient pas été aussi criants si le jeu était au bas mot 30% moins vaste mais mieux rempli. Ce qui ne change certes pas le résultat, mais ne donne pas trop d'inquiétude pour l'avenir – surtout l'avenir proche, c'est à dire les DLC, qui seront sans doute (comme d'habitude chez FromSoft, du moins peut-on l'espérer) plus chiadés que le main game.

Pour terminer sur cette question du dosage, quelque chose de tout bête : la musique. Dans les faits, j'aime beaucoup la musique d'exploration dans Elden Ring. Typiquement celle du Plateau Altus qui donne réellement le sentiment de se promener dans le Valhalla (cette zone c'est décidément le package esthétique ultime, rah), celle des sous-terrains qui en deux accords confèrent une noblesse incongrue à cette zone putride et abandonnée, celle de Liurna brumeuse à souhait... Mais plus je jouais plus je ressentais le manque d'un vieil ami : le silence. J'avais déjà été frappé à ma découverte de Dark Souls premier du nom par le temps qu'on passe à jouer sans musique, à n'entendre que les bruit des pas et les cliquètements de l'armure qui résonnent dans le noir – et l'effet que ça fait lorsqu'au détour d'un mur de fumée le thème d'un boss explose à la figure. J'avais aussi été perturbé mais agréablement surpris lors de ma découverte récente (2 semaines avant Elden Ring de fait) de Demon's Souls, dans lequel pendant 90% du temps on entend même pas le bruit de nos pas car on joue sous forme d'âme... le silence y est encore plus pesant. Dans Elden Ring il n'y a pas beaucoup de silence, toujours une trame de fond – très jolie mais qui contribue à lisser un tantinet l'expérience de jeu. Si cette BO avait été, au minimum, intermittente – comme avait tenté de l'être celle de Breath of the Wild (et je promets que c'est la seule fois que vous me verrez mentionner ce jeu dans cette critique) – l'impact de ces musiques n'en aurait sans doute été que meilleur. Ou bien une autre solution, je ne sais pas, toujours est-il que c'est une occasion manquée de renforcer l'immersion et de dynamiser le vécu du joueur.


2. À l'assaut des horizons de From Software

À présent il est temps d'aborder les vraies choses qui fâchent – enfin non, qui inquiètent plutôt. Jusqu'à présent on pouvait mettre toutes mes remarques – ou presque – sur le compte d'un projet dépassé par ses ambitions, par des problèmes d'équilibrage certes dus au temps et aux moyens mais aussi à la découverte d'un nouveau paradigme, celui de l'open-world, qui reste à peaufiner et c'est bien normal. Mais si c'était là la seule origine des problèmes d'Elden Ring, très sincèrement je ne me serais pas embêté à rédiger un texte. Cette partie-ci va être plus intéressante – et aussi plus débattable, car il s'agira majoritairement de remarques sur les choix de design, sur la philosophie générale de FromSoft et la direction prise par les jeux chapeautés par Miyazaki depuis grosso modo Bloodborne. Ce sera plus fun à écrire – et à lire j'espère – mais les conclusions seront plus funestes, car si Elden Ring est représentatif de l'état d'esprit général de Miyazaki et si l'avenir devait donner raison à mes craintes alors il y a de grandes chances pour que les prochaines sorties du studio me plaisent de moins en moins.

Elden Ring m'a poussé – et quelque part je l'en remercie – à me demander en profondeur pourquoi au fond le gameplay des Souls m'avait toujours semblé satisfaisant malgré son manque évident de profondeur. C'est vrai au fond, jouer à Dark/Demon's Souls c'est essentiellement rouler et taper au bon moment. Faire gaffe d'être à bonne distance, apprendre quand avancer, reculer, bloquer ou rouler. Les choix de build favoriseront plus l'une ou l'autre des options ; les gros tanks dans Dark Souls 1 pouvaient bloquer très efficacement et se passer majoritairement de rouler (leur roulade étant de toute manière appauvrie par le poids de l'équipement qui leur permettait d'avoir l'assise nécessaire pour encaisser les coups sans broncher) tandis que les builds plus agiles et légers privilégiaient l'optimisation des roulades avec le bon timing (leur équilibre malingre les empêche de bloquer de manière optimale et leur légèreté augmente l'efficacité des roulades). Il y avait la parade, chouette mécanique qui demandait beaucoup de skill mais ne fonctionnait que sur certains boss et ennemis (et encore pas sur tous les coups). Un système très limité, mais comme le jeu était construit et arrangé autour de ça, le système était très efficace – et porté par de très bonnes sensations de jeu. Et surtout, comparé à l'immense majorité des RPG ou action RPG, les chiffres ne faisaient pas tout. Dès le début du jeu notre personnage a la capacité de vaincre n'importe quoi si sa connaissance du jeu et son exécution sont à la hauteur. Il y a dans Dark Souls ce sentiment grisant de savoir que suffisamment de patience et d'apprentissage nous permettront d'aller très très loin. L'exploration n'en est que plus organique ; se voir rejeté d'une zone simplement parce que nos stats nous la rendent rigoureusement impraticable, c'est un sentiment qui à mon sens brise cette immersion, on se retrouve face à un jeu vidéo qui nous dit à sa manière vidéoludique qu'il faut aller voir ailleurs car ces monstres sont imprenables, même si ce ne sont que des moustiques d'une couleur différentes de ceux que j'affronte dans une zone moins hostile. Dark Souls offre cette ouverture tout en nous donnant une option pour affronter tout et n'importe quoi – même si c'est déraisonnable nous avons la possibilité de l'attaquer d'une façon organique (j'aime bien ce mot ouais). Voilà pourquoi même si ce système n'a pas une grande profondeur en termes du pure action, c'est l'un de mes préférés pour explorer un monde hostile. Il fait énormément avec très peu.

Elden Ring, au fond, fonctionne un peu pareil. Ou du moins le joueur est limité à peu près de la même manière. Depuis Dark Souls 1 sa mobilité s'est notablement améliorée – et accélérée. Le jeu introduit la chouette mécanique du contre de bouclier qui permet de riposter après avoir bloqué un coup, par une attaque qui engage beaucoup le personnage par le temps d'attaque et de récupération mais inflige beaucoup de dégâts de posture. Idéale à caser à la fin d'un combo lorsqu'un boss ou un ennemi est dans son animation de récupération. Le jeu introduit également de vraies attaques sautées – fortes ou faibles, qui sont risquées mais infligent elles aussi beaucoup de dommage de posture. Avec cette mécanique très clairement héritée de Sekiro, Elden Ring favorise la proactivité envers les ennemis et boss. Je pourrais critiquer le fait que cette barre est invisible et donc imprécise, mais à la rigueur les Souls ont toujours poussé à l'expérimentation donc l'apprentissage par essai/erreur est justifiable. En tout cas ça donne l'envie de risquer de se prendre des coups pour baisser le plus vite possible la posture de l'ennemi et lui caler un critique. C'est un peu bordélique mais il ne fait aucun doute que ça dynamise le combat. Le problème c'est que comme le reste du gameplay, cette mécanique se fait manger petit à petit par l'évolution du design des boss. Glisser un coup critique c'est bien sympa mais au fond ça ne fait pas si mal que ça ; la mécanique n'est pas suffisamment centrale pour demeurer réellement pertinente sur le late game, lorsque les boss (parfois doubles) deviennent des éponges à PV ou bien font tellement mal qu'un échange de coup devient systématiquement en la défaveur du joueur, sans compter que les ouvertures sécures deviennent de plus en plus moindres voire inexistantes pour certains boss si on porte des armes lourdes.

Et c'est là l'un des plus gros problèmes d'Elden Ring. On a pu gloser sur le design des boss de Dark Souls 3, en disant que c'était comme affronter des créatures sorties de Bloodborne avec un personnage resté sur Dark Souls 1. Ce qui est en partie vrai, même si le perso reste beaucoup plus vif dans DS3 que dans DS1 et que les roulades sont très généreuses et faciles à enchainer sans fin en cas de panique. Mais si vous pensez ça alors attendez de vous taper les boss ultimes d'Elden Ring. Les pires d'entre eux ne sortent pas de Bloodborne mais de Sekiro, tandis votre personnage, lui, est toujours celui de Dark Souls 3. Et les petites mécaniques qui rendent agréables les combats du début de jeu jusqu'à la fin du mid-game cessent quasiment d'exister tant les ennemis affrontés sont beaucoup plus rapides et plus puissants que ceux que vous avez affronté jusqu'alors. Et si encore on pouvait y faire quelque chose, répliquer en misant sur le travail des réflexes etc, mais ça ne vaut souvent pas la peine. Affronter une Malénia ou un Maliketh en restant près d'eux et en roulant agilement pour esquiver chaque coup de leurs interminables combos, c'est risquer l'ennui pur (dans le cas de Maliketh) ou simplement la mort (Malénia, car un de ses fameux combos est parfaitement inévitable si vous êtres à moins de 50 mètres d'elle – vous vous prendrez des dommages potentiellement mortels et même si vous survivez elle aura régénéré une grosse partie de sa barre de vie). Un Mogh est plus pardonnable, car le coller est en fin de compte la meilleure stratégie pour éviter l'invraisemblable quantité de flammes sanglantes qu'il disperse au moindre de ses coups, et il n'est pas trop rapide non plus, mais son arène est calamiteuse. Le dernier boss est sans doute le pire design (même s'il n'est pas le plus dur à battre en soi), c'est invraisemblable qu'on ait pas accès à Torrent pour courir jusqu'à lui et éviter ses attaques à tête chercheuse.

Tous ces boss donnent l'impression qu'il est impossible d'interagir avec eux autrement qu'en étant dans l'attente morne qu'ils finissent leurs acrobaties afin de pouvoir caser un coup puis repartir (ou bien il faut être un mage et attaquer à distance, mais réserver l'interaction à un nombre très limité de build ça n'est pas du bon game-design), et pire que ça ! À partir de Morgott les boss prennent l'habitude de moduler leurs combos en fonction du placement du joueur. Et je ne parle pas que du fait qu'ils arrêtent un combo parce qu'on est trop loin d'eux, ça c'est logique et ça permet d'enchainer sur un autre pattern plus adapté ; le problème vient quand le joueur a réussi sa succession de roulades et a chopé un moment de trou pour caser un coup et que soudainement le boss introduit un nouveau startup de combo très rapide pour punir spécifiquement la faille trouvée par le joueur. La conséquence que ça a pour ledit joueur : arrêter de punir – et d'interagir. Attendre la seule attaque safe qui arrive toutes les 20 ou 30 secondes et placer un coup de la manière la plus safe possible, et repartir. Puisque les ennemis ont considérablement amélioré leur mobilité et leurs outils pour nous tuer dans ce jeu, mais que notre personnage lui est resté au fond la petite chose limitée mais obstinée qu'il a toujours été. Notre personnage n'est pas Sekiro, ici pas de système de parade parfaite, d'endurance infinie, d'outils de prothèse spécifiques pour contrer un boss en particulier ; en réalité pas de moyen d'être réellement pro-actif passé un certain stade dans le jeu – à moins bien sûr de se résoudre à invoquer une autre version de nous même qui prend l'aggro et nous permet de tirer une victoire ennuyeuse en cassant le combat. Wouhou.

Parce que je suis un optimiste, je peux m'imaginer que certaines de ces extensions de combo étaient peut-être une solution pour éviter qu'il suffise d'aller taper les fesses de tous les boss de manière safe comme ça a souvent été le cas dans leurs jeux, quelque chose qui nécessiterait surtout un meilleur équilibrage. Mais là encore une petite voix me souffle que c'était aussi peut-être par sadisme, pour augmenter cette difficulté tant vantée dans les médias et les discussions de gens relous. Et attention je fais partie de ces gens qui apprécient la difficulté de ces jeux (même si on en fait tout un pataquès pour pas grand chose à mon humble avis, ça ne devrait pas être une quesion centrale), mais j'ai peur que FromSoft ne sache plus trop comment garder cette street cred de studio qui attire une populace de forceurs et en soit réduit à choisir l'abus de plus en plus souvent par défaut d'un moyen plus créatif de nous piéger. Alors que s'il y a bien quelque chose que la plupart des fans des Soulsborne-kiro répètent à longueur de temps comme un mantra c'est que ces jeux sont durs mais justes. Ça ne me dérange pas de mourir en boucle, j'ai l'habitude, mais j'aime me dire que c'est de ma faute et que je n'ai pas assez travaillé telle ou telle partie du pattern du boss ou que je n'étais simplement pas assez concentré – ou que je n'avais pas utilisé tous les outils en ma possession, ou simplement pas assez bien regardé l'arène du boss pour y trouver une astuce qui me permettrait de gagner l'avantage. Elden Ring m'a fait mourir beaucoup trop de fois en me donnant la certitude que non, ce n'était pas de ma faute cette fois. Ou bien si, c'était de ma faute parce que je n'avais pas choisi le bon build.

Et on en vient à un autre point : Elden Ring a sans doute la plus grande variabilité de build des Souls – les équivalents des mages et clercs des opus précédents notamment voient leur arsenal considérablement augmenté et raffiné. L'amélioration des compétences d'armes par rapport à Dark Souls 3 en font enfin une option de combat viable (certains sont inutiles et d'autres complètement pétés mais c'est tout de même une sacrée avancée). Le jeu a plus d'armes que jamais et ces armes sont vraiment agréables à manier. Mais là encore le jeu n'est pas calibré de manière à donner une chance juste à tous ces builds. Evidemment, certains builds seront avantagés pour certains combats et désavantagés pour d'autres, c'est une évidence – et une bonne chose au fond, ça rend le jeu plus organique et ça nous offre différents angles d'approche, une manière d'aborder les obstacles en pensant à la manière dont fonctionne tout le monde qui l'entoure et non simplement comme un combat isolé du reste. Mais là encore, le dernier tiers/quart du jeu présente quelques obstacles que certains builds ne pourront pas affronter d'une manière satisfaisante ou même inventive sans changer tout ou au moins partie de leur personnage.

Je vais prendre mon exemple : arrivé devant Malénia, boss très rapide avec une grande allonge, qui possède relativement peu de vie mais se soigne considérablement à chaque attaque qui touche (y compris bloquée par un bouclier, ce qui invalide immédiatement la mécanique du contre). Un boss qui peut certes être déstabilisé par les coups qu'on lui donne (bonne idée) mais possède de nombreuses attaques dont le startup est impossible à briser et quasi-immédiat (fausse bonne idée). Mon personnage, un build dextérité/foi armé d'un espadon, ne permettait pas de stun suffisamment Malénia pour me permettre d'attaquer de manière safe, car je m'exposais alors à des ripostes plus rapides que le temps que je prenais pour finir mon animation de récupération. Et même si je prenais une patience infinie pour ne punir que une ou deux attaques qui ne comportaient aucune extension surprise, je risquais la mort à tout moment si l'aléatoire n'était pas en ma faveur, car à partir d'un certain stade Malénia peut sortir de nulle part une attaque interminable dont certains dommages sont parfaitement inévitables. Alors, présenté face à un adversaire injuste qui contrait parfaitement mon build, plutôt que de prendre mon mal en patience et d'y passer des jours j'ai fait ce que je n'ai fait qu'une seule fois pendant ce jeu ; j'ai totalement refait mon build. J'ai utilisé une larme larvaire pour me donner un de ces fameux builds sang/arcane totalement pétés qui allait me permettre de vider Malénia de son sang en restant à une certaine distance de sécurité. Et j'ai invoqué Tiche, assassin parfaitement adapté au combat contre ce boss en particulier. Même avec ce set-up j'ai dû m'y prendre une petite dizaine de fois avant d'y arriver, mais la victoire ne m'a donné nul sentiment de triomphe, nulle joie – j'étais plus défait qu'autre chose. Le combat ne m'a pas paru amusant – ce qui me laisse entendre que je n'apprécierais que très modérément de tenter un build de magie à distance, mais bon. J'ai ensuite remis mon build originel en utilisant une autre larme larvaire et heureusement j'ai pu finir le jeu sans plus bidouiller (même si les deux foutus boss finaux sont très résistants aux dégâts sacrés, mais là à la rigueur j'ai pu utiliser mes dernières ressources pour me forger une arme différente).

Pourtant, je suis le premier à applaudir qu'un Dark Souls donne la possibilité d'expérimenter assez librement pour vaincre ses défis. Modifier mon approche pour battre Malénia aurait dû être quelque chose de grisant, comme de comprendre enfin la solution d'une énigme. Sauf qu'ici en l'occurrence ça voulait dire modifier tout ce qui faisait de mon personnage ce qu'il était depuis le début. Pas simplement changer d'arme, ou utiliser une astuce de terrain : utiliser un build dont internet m'a dit qu'il était passe-partout et permettait d'invalider tout obstacle. J'ai eu l'impression non pas de résoudre un puzzle en changeant mon angle de vue mais d'actionner un cheat code (et encore, pas très bien parce que je n'étais pas à l'aise avec la manière dont on jouait un sorcier à distance). Le problème ne vient pas du fait que jouer sanguin sur Elden Ring c'est être un Dieu parmi les mortels, mais du fait que Malénia a un design tellement absurde que la seule manière raisonnable d'en venir à bout est de ne pas interagir avec elle. Soit en maniant (je ne l'ai compris après) deux armes colossales pour la maintenir à terre, soit en restant à distance avec des sorts et éventuellement une invocation pour attirer l'aggro. Une solution aurait pu être de mieux implémenter le saut comme option de défense et de contre-attaque ; par exemple si ces combos de 8 à 10 coups avait des coups de taille au sol explicitement désignés comme étant des moments où l'on peut sauter par dessus de manière sécure et asséner un coup au boss pour le déstabiliser et interrompre ledit combo, ce serait déjà un grand pas en avant dans l'interactivité ! Le saut comme option défensive manque de clarté, les moddeurs ont pu vérifier que la partie basse du corps devient invincible c'est donc prévu pour – mais les attaques en face sont peu intuitives ; certaines qui donnent l'impression de pouvoir être contrées en sautant ne le sont pas, et d'autres qui paraissent in-sautables le sont. Mais de toute façon en l'état ça ne change pas grand chose car le combo continue derrière et notre personnage se met en danger contre ces boss absurdes même s'il tente une attaque sautée.

Et le jeu de me donner l'impression que même si je joue bien de la manière qui me donne le plus de plaisir – vu que j'apprécie très modérément d'éprouver les autres outils mis à ma disposition – mais que cette façon de jouer ne permet pas toujours d'avoir une stratégie viable face à ce que présente le jeu, dans l'absurdité de ses choix de design d'endgame. Tout ça fait croire que je ne cause que de Malénia, qui est un boss optionnel qui-plus-est, mais transférez ces critiques à Maliketh (plutôt dans le versant ennui, moins dans le bullshit) et à tous les duos de boss infernaux et ça reste valide. Avec certains boss il n'est simplement pas possible d'interagir, d'avoir une quelconque forme de duel ou de gameplay intéressant. Car ils n'ont pas été faits pour autre chose que former une barrière intimidante et presque infranchissable (en tout cas non sans un cocktail amer de douleur et d'ennui). Et encore je ne suis pas trop à plaindre, une fois arrivé à Mogh (assez tôt grâce à la quête de Varré) j'ai pris la décision salutaire de sacrifier une bonne partie de ma dextérité pour l'injecter dans ma vigueur, augmentant drastiquement mes PVs, imaginez les pauvres bougres qui jouent au corps à corps et qui se feront systématiquement one-shot par les ennemis et boss du late game dont la force de frappe a été artificiellement gonflée ? Heureusement Placidulax, Godfrey/Hoarah Loux et Radagon sont trois excellents boss, si seulement l'Elden Beast n'existait pas l'endgame serait bien plus supportable...

Pour en finir sur les boss, je dirais qu'un autre problème d'Elden Ring est que ceux-ci manquent de variété. Je ne parle pas du recyclage (j'ai fini de tirer sur l'ambulance c'est bon) mais simplement du fait qu'ils sont tous construits et pensés autour de la roulade. J'aurais aimé dire autour du bouclier aussi, mais même si les boucliers sont plutôt balaises dans ce jeu les boss sont trop vifs pour qu'on puisse dire que certains boss sont pensés autour du blocage d'attaque – en tout cas c'est peanut comparé à la roulade comme outil principal de défense. FromSoft est devenu meilleur à extrapoler ce concept, mais Elden Ring commence à rendre ces raffinements un peu écœurants (par exemple les timings toujours plus absurdes des coups retenus en l'air avant de retomber... oui on a bien compris que Miyazaki voulait piéger les joueurs qui pensaient s'être adaptés à tous les contretemps possibles, mais ça devient un peu risible dans le paradigme limité des Souls). Ce que je veux dire c'est que ce système n'est pas suffisamment profond pour que tout un casting de boss repose sur cette seule mécanique. Demon's Souls et Dark Souls ont des designs de boss que je trouve finalement supérieurs dans l'ensemble. Avec évidemment plus de gros fails, comme le Foyer du Chaos ou le Dieu Dragon, mais davantage de boss qui, vu la limitation du gameplay, étaient comme des énigmes à résoudre. Des « gimmick boss » comme on dit. Une désignation souvent utilisée de manière péjorative, mais qui laissait la place à une créativité qui manque cruellement dans les opus suivants. Et ce depuis Dark Souls 2*, je ne jette pas la pierre à Elden Ring en particulier c'est un mouvement en marche depuis longtemps. Simplement comme pour le reste Elden Ring en donne tellement qu'il écœure.

Pourtant les combats les plus gimmick font partie de mes préférés. Rykard par exemple, étend et raffine le concept du combat contre Yhorm de DS3 (et par extension celui contre le Roi des Tempêtes de Demon's Souls) en donnant un moveset complet à l'arme spéciale et en faisant grimper le spectacle au delà de 9000. Radahn – mon boss préféré malgré ses défauts – a aussi son gimmick avec l'invocation en masse de PNJs pour nous « aider » (ou bien nous gêner) – ainsi que la possibilité de le faire à cheval. Même si je n'ai utilisé ni l'un ni l'autre, préférant danser en solo avec lui, la possibilité d'utiliser tout ceci est clairement un plus et l'aide à se distinguer des autres combats du jeu. La première phase de Rennala est également un beau moment – même si le fait d'être obligé de se la retaper si on rate la deuxième phase est un peu agaçant. J'aurais aimé plus de combats comme ceux-ci. Depuis le DLC de Dark Souls, Miyazaki a clairement voulu raffiner et dupliquer Artorias et Manus partout où il le pouvait, en abandonnant petit à petit les autres formats. Il a clairement réussi à les améliorer et les rendre de plus en plus spectaculaires, mais quelque chose s'est perdu au passage et on commence franchement à éprouver les limites du boss-à-roulades. D'autant que ce format oblige à limiter également le design des arènes. Comptez le nombre de combats où l'arène importe dans le jeu – ou même où l'arène a un signe distinctif autre qu'esthétique (ça de belles arènes on en a, mais la plupart sont de grands espaces vides dans lesquelles le boss peut s'ébattre pépouze et flex devant nos yeux ébahis). Il y a bien l'arène du duo de gargouilles avec son pilier salvateur mais le boss est trop mal foutu et l'occasion manquée. La bibliothèque de la première phase de Rennala est chouette, même si bien sûr sa plus forte attaque traverse les murs. Les piliers du duo d'apôtres jouent le même rôle que ceux dans le combat d'Ornstein & Smough sauf que là le boss est encore pire. Les piliers sur lesquels Maliketh prend appui sont cools mais sont parfois l'occasion de bugs peu élégants. Et il faut bien le dire, quand il y a du mobilier dans ces combats de boss ça finit souvent par gêner plus qu'autre chose. Les arènes ne sont plus des éléments de gameplay à part entière comme elles pouvaient l'être contre l'araignée cuirassée, le chevalier de la Tour, les anthropophages, le vieux Héros de Demon's Souls, ou la décharge incessante, Gwyndolin, le Golem de fer, le Taurus ou Nito de Dark Souls... autant de combats où comprendre et utiliser l'environnement faisait partie intégrante du combat. Je ne suis bien sûr pas en train de demander à ce que l'ont ait plus que ce type de combat : j'aime les combats de roulade ! Mais je ne veux pas qu'ils soient le seul test de mes capacités, je veux que le jeu me récompense pour penser un peu autrement de temps en temps. Un peu de variété – autre qu'esthétique – pour d'autant mieux apprécier chaque recoin du gameplay. Pour deux Radagon et Hoarah Loux donnez moi un Rykard et je serai le plus heureux des stans.

Je retire d'Elden Ring un sentiment global de menu maxi-best-of. Et durant la première moitié du jeu j'étais prêt à croire que c'était le meilleur de tous les mondes. Mais un contact plus prolongé avec le jeu me fait questionner le fait que FromSoft ait réellement compris certains points forts de leurs jeux précédents. Ou même le mérite qu'avait pu avoir l'audace conceptuelle de Sekiro. On voit régulièrement des petites choses qui rappellent des mécaniques des opus non-Souls (la rune de Malénia qui permet de jouer un peu à Bloodborne, l'infiltration à la Sekiro-mais-vite-fait, la jauge de posture...), mais le jeu autour ne fait rien – ou peu – pour les accomoder. J'ai déjà suffisamment parlé du design des boss qui paraissent sortis ou bien de Bloodborne ou de Sekiro sans que notre personnage n'ait été pensé en conséquence. D'après les testeurs la version bêta du jeu, lors du network test, semblait avoir un système de balance qui ressemblait à celui de Dark Souls ! J'en rêve ! Mais s'il a bien existé durant la bêta il n'en reste aujourd'hui plus une trace. C'est le retour à Dark Souls 3 avec ses armures qui n'ont plus de valeur qu'esthétique (la défense dépend essentiellement du levelling, pas la peine de vous prendre la tête sur le poids des armures etc, à part pour les jauges de resistances aux altérations d'état) et l'équilibre qui permet surtout à certains coups de certaines armes colossales de frapper sans subir de recul si on se fait frapper sur certaines frames. Dommage car je répèterai jusqu'à l'épuisement que la balance était la meilleure innovation de gameplay de Dark Souls, qui méritait certes de l'équilibrage pour ne pas qu'on se contente rouler sur tout le jeu avec l'armure de Havel mais qui proposait une autre option de jeu que le bouclier ou la roulade. Et rien que ça c'est énorme, c'est – à mon sens – plus que toutes les myriades de petites innovations de surface d'Elden Ring.

Pour beaucoup des points de cette deuxième partie Elden Ring n'est pas le seul coupable, et les signes de ces évolutions de game-design, bonnes ou mauvaises, datent aussi des jeux précédents, mais si je choisis ce jeu pour en parler c'est que dans son épuisement il les dévoile avec d'autant plus de clarté. Et comme je le dis au début, je célèbre le succès de FromSoft avec ce nouveau jeu tout en m'inquiétant qu'il soit si massif – et qu'on entende peu de critiques développées sur des points pourtant cruciaux – et pour certains répétés depuis si longtemps qu'on se demande si le studio a un jour prévu de les corriger. Non, je ne parle pas que de la caméra, même si ouais un jour ce serait bien qu'ils apportent des modifications qui ne soient pas que de surface (i.e. rendre certains objets transparents lorsque la caméra s'en approche pour qu'on y voit un peu plus clair, c'est pas mal mais pas suffisant). Je n'en ai pas parlé parce qu'au fond ça n'a pas eu d'impact sérieux sur mon expérience (et parce que je connais le studio depuis un moment et que je suis habitué à naviguer dans leurs interfaces peu ergonomiques), mais l'accessibilité laisse vraiment à désirer. Et il ne suffit pas de dire que le jeu fait exprès d'être cryptique et que ça fait partie du délire, parce que c'est faux : Elden Ring propose beaucoup d'options pour améliorer la qualité de vie et l'ergonomie, mais ne les explique jamais... Il leur manque de l'accessibilité à leurs options d'accessibilité, c'est un comble. S'il était clairement dit comment fonctionnait la map ou la gestion de l'inventaire par exemple, on s'épargnerait beaucoup de temps rébarbatif dans les menus. C'est pas grand chose, mais c'est parlant sur les efforts que le studio peut faire sur des choses basiques. Et n'oublions pas que le tuto sur le fonctionnement des runes nous ment purement et simplement en nous disant que les arcs runiques servent à amplifier le pouvoir des runes, alors que non : ils permettent carrément de l'activer. J'ai équipé ma première rune, celle de Godfrey comme à peu près tout le monde, et j'ai cru que ça y est tous mes attributs étaient augmentés, trop bien ! Tandis qu'il s'agissait d'un système similaire aux humanités ou plutôt à l'embrasement de DS3, il suffisait de le dire correctement... M'enfin.

Je vais m'arrêter là. D'une part parce que je pense avoir fini ma liste de choses à critiquer... et d'autre part parce que je commence à me sentir pâle de dire tant de mal de ce super jeu. C'est simplement qu'un jeu qui propose tant de contenu demande qu'on prenne du temps pour en parler aussi. Jeu qui ose beaucoup = nécessairement beaucoup de choses à critiquer, mais si j'avais voulu parler des choses positives et raconter ne serait-ce qu'une partie des moments de dingueries dont j'ai fait l'expérience dans le jeu le texte serait 3 fois plus long (et personne ne veut ça, surtout pas moi). Les donjons sont les meilleurs jamais conçus par le studio – l'intégration du saut y est pour quelque chose ; les designs, présentations et mise en scène des boss sont parmi les meilleures de la série ; le lore y est riche – peut-être trop par moment mais s'y balader de manière éclatée m'a semblé très gratifiant ; Leyndell est toujours la meilleure zone/donjon jamais vue dans un FromSoft moderne, juste milieu utopique entre la grande ouverture et le labyrinthe sophistiqué ; même les marais empoisonnés sont bons car ils sont soit en monde ouvert (auquel cas Torrent peut s'y promener tranquille) soit conçus autour de leur condition de marais empoisonné (le lac putréfié est une saleté bien pensée car avare en ennemis et riche de plateformes bien placées). Et évidemment, évidemment, malgré mes réserves Elden Ring défonce la concurrence contemporaine dans son genre**. Mais voilà quand toutes les choses que le jeu essayait de glisser sous le tapis viennent te mordre en boucle pendant une bonne 30 à 40aine d'heures, qui a fortiori sont les dernières, ça donne un peu envie de refaire le monde, questionner les choix de design des développeurs et mes choix de vie.

Elden Ring est un très bon jeu dans l'ensemble. On peut parier qu'il sera influent ne serait-ce que par l'ombre intimidante qu'il laissera dans son sillage – et même s'il n'est pas imité (ce dont on peut douter vu que les Soulslike pullulaient dans la sphère indé bien avant que ce jeu-ci devienne massif) tous les jeux open world ou simplement action RPG des prochaines années seront mesurés à son aune. Le succès est là, le retour consensuellement positif est là. C'est pourquoi il est d'autant plus crucial que les développeurs attentifs et From Software eux-mêmes apprennent des erreurs de ce jeu pour ne pas les répliquer ad nauseam dans les temps qui suivent. En ce qui me concerne, c'est hélas loin d'être mon jeu FromSoft favori, il s'incline devant Dark Souls, Bloodborne, Sekiro ainsi que Demon's Souls dans mon panthéon personne – et j'ai du mal à être très optimiste pour la suite (même si j'attends les DLC avec impatience, je ne doute pas qu'ils sauront inverser certaines tendances mortifères du jeu de base comme ils l'ont souvent fait). Mais très sincèrement j'espère être dans l'erreur, et j'espère que si Elden Ring 2 sort je serai le premier à le trouver bien supérieur à toutes mes attentes. Même si à dire vrai, j'aimerais mieux – même si c'est commercialement peu probable – qu'ils lâchent le modèle Soulsien pour mieux se réinventer comme ils l'avaient si bien fait avec Sekiro.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Tintamarre_Wazoo 2022-04-12T20:35:48Z
2022-04-12T20:35:48Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
*Bloodborne également, car si la roulade était le SEUL moyen effectif (avec la parade) pour se défendre au moins les mécaniques du jeu permettaient un tout autre dynamisme de combat, avec notamment la régénération de vie si on contrattaquait après un coup reçu.

**Même si je ne suis pas convaincu que FromSoft sache, en tout cas à cette heure, en tirer le maximum pour faire briller leurs principales qualité. Par exemple leur force de mise en scène est considérablement diluée du fait de l'ouverture.
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Show more
Show less
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
draft
en
Expand review Hide
Title
things i don't like about the thing that everybody likes
i think i saw some interview a few weeks ago where the guy who makes these games said he was really nervous about releasing this game, and i think i see why. especially for being something as outrageously hyped as this game had been since its announcement, this one really seems to lack the complex metanarrative that bloodborne has or even the cohesively engineered combat mechanics of sekiro.

not that i think it's a "DISAPPOINTING" game - i mean, it's... fine???? at its core, it's mostly just another dark souls game, from the way the game asks you to handle its fights down to even reusing many of its assets and thematic devices from the dark souls games. i mostly get the impression that these guys have found a comfort zone in making these dark souls games, and find satisfaction in doing the same thing over and over.

sure, i hate judging the content of any form of media solely on the comparison of its predecessors as much as the next guy, but when it seems like the whole game is built and marketed around the coattails of From's previous works, some problems start to arise. unlike bloodborne, where every single setpiece is carefully placed to craft the environmental storytelling of its narrative, most of the setpieces and themes in this one often feel vapid and disconnected. unlike sekiro, where every factor of its combat system is designed to make sense within the philosophy of its world, this game's combat feels like the team threw a bunch of ideas at the wall and decided to figure it out later.

i guess if anything, it's more fun than most of the things the dark souls games let you do. featuring a greater selection of cool looking big swords and more flashy and big weapon abilities, this game does a fine job of rewarding your exploration into the tucked away corners of its world.

playing this game the night it released was also a really entertaining experience! being a part of something completely new and racing to publish information by internet word-of-mouth and through the in-game messaging system is a great way of fostering a sense of community, and the first 20 hours of the game until i beat the 2nd required boss had fantastic tone building, like the same mood the end of dark souls 3 achieves except done at the beginning of this game. past this point, though, i guess i stopped thinking about any of that as many of the dungeons and fights started to blend together for me.

so when people at my workplace talk to me about how incredible this game is, it's mostly by virtue of the game's moment to moment action parts alone. i've put a lot of brainpower these past 2 months into trying to wrap my head around where this game becomes a Masterpiece... and i'm not seeing it? not to say i don't think this game does deep the way From's better works do, but if it does, then i'm not interested enough to look into it (which i don't know if it's an issue of the game's disconnected themes or just uninteresting writing or what, haven't thought on that one). it's weird feeling the way i do about this game, considering how everyone around me is raving their asses off about it. maybe i just start to get a little queasy after spending 110 hours on a single playthrough - i start to feel like i've wasted my time.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
kramerfromseinfeld 2022-04-07T00:28:35Z
2022-04-07T00:28:35Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
draft
en
Expand review Hide
Title
Elden Ring - THE Open World Game
many people have compared this game to breath of the wild and i think that this comparison is very accurate in many ways. in fact i would say that elden ring often feels and plays more like botw and skyrim than other souls titles. i would even go as far and say that elden ring is in it´s essence more of an open world game than a souls game. with that i don´t mean that it plays like all the other open world games out there. it´s quite the opposite because i think that all those Assassins Creed/Red Dead Redemption fetch quest „go here do this“ type Open World Games in their essence don´t really feel like open world games at all. this game does though. it is in many ways the ultimate Open World game, by actually realizing the genres potentials.

Pros

- actually plays like an open world game instead of forcing linearity by telling you what to do. it is in many ways what open world games should be. it uses physicality of an open space for well - making sense of that very space being a central part of the gameplay.
- a true action rpg: Variety of Gameplay options and Combat mechanics in regards to playing it your own way
- exploration is ALWAYS rewarded
- combination of open spaces and legacy dungeons
- not spamming the map with markers but just making it look interesting and having you set markers yourself and explore what looks interesting
- discovering something always has a sense of wonder behind it because you discovered it yourself and the game didn´t force you into it
- from software typical clever branched out world design


Cons

- by being open world is suffers more from inaccesibility than other souls games. to really get the most wholesome experience and not „miss“ stuff youll probably need to look up guides. there is no sense behind hiding this one random item at a random spot dropped by a random enemy that is super significant. same goes for creating builds. the game pretty much doesn´t tell you anything so youll probably need to look that up too. no game should imo rely on internet forums and youtube tutorials to be fully experienced. they definitely did not hit the sweet spot between too much and too little handholding
- boss fights suffer from something that in general benefits the game which is the gameplay variety that combat can be approached through. in previous souls games especially BB and Sekiro you only had a limited variety of options and therefore needed to figure out specific patterns and the resulting feeling of accomplishment once you figured it out and mastered it was absolutely fantastic. in this game you can trivialize most bosses through specific build strategies. specific mechanics don´t really play a role and the famous combat rythm to be found in games such as bb and sekiro is almost completely absent. That means that boss fights in comparison to other souls titles are not the essence of the game here.
Body
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
mindmastermoe 2022-03-14T17:53:44Z
2022-03-14T17:53:44Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Supplement
tips
Formatting
[b]text[/b] - bold
[i]text[/i] - italic
[s]strikethrough[/s] - strikethrough
[tt]text[/tt] - fixed-width type
[color red]text[/color] - colored text (full list)
[spoiler]text[/spoiler] - Text hidden with spoiler cover
[https://www.example.com/page/,Link to another site] - Link to another site

Linking
When you mention an album, artist, film, game, label, etc - it's recommended to link to the item the first time you mention it. Doing so will make it easier to search for your post and give it more visibility. To link an item, use the search box above, or find the shortcut that appears on the page that you want to link. You can customize the link name of shortcuts by using the format [Artist12345,Custom Name].
Paste the address (or embed code) below and click "embed".
Supported: YouTube, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Vimeo, Dailymotion
Embed
Attribution
Requested publishing level
Draft
Commentary
Review
draft
en
Expand review Hide

Catalog

skyhigh696 Elden Ring 2022-05-23T14:30:02Z
2022-05-23T14:30:02Z
5.0
4
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
WHATISLOSTINTHEMINES Elden Ring 2022-05-23T13:35:28Z
2022-05-23T13:35:28Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
UtopiaM Elden Ring 2022-05-23T12:04:33Z
2022-05-23T12:04:33Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Decrepitude Elden Ring 2022-05-23T08:54:49Z
2022-05-23T08:54:49Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
dannymason_1 Elden Ring 2022-05-23T01:56:09Z
2022-05-23T01:56:09Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
rovergara Elden Ring 2022-05-23T01:32:19Z
2022-05-23T01:32:19Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Proftheworm Elden Ring 2022-05-22T22:15:52Z
2022-05-22T22:15:52Z
5.0
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Marat_Alimov Elden Ring 2022-05-22T18:30:32Z
2022-05-22T18:30:32Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
RaakoML Elden Ring 2022-05-22T18:13:35Z
2022-05-22T18:13:35Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Lornz Elden Ring 2022-05-22T11:43:22Z
2022-05-22T11:43:22Z
3.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Meilis Elden Ring 2022-05-22T09:01:48Z
2022-05-22T09:01:48Z
4.5
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
AmjadenManjadi Elden Ring 2022-05-22T04:37:11Z
PS4 / PS5
2022-05-22T04:37:11Z
5.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Media
Download

Comments

Rules for comments
  • Be respectful! All the community rules apply here.
  • Keep your comments focused on the game. Don't post randomness/off-topic comments. Jokes are fine, but don't post tactless/inappropriate ones.
  • Don't get in arguments with people here, or start long discussions. Use the boards for extended discussion.
  • Don't use this space to complain about the average rating, chart position, genre voting, others' reviews or ratings, or errors on the page.
  • Don't comment just to troll/provoke. Likewise, don't respond to trollish comments; just report them and ignore them.
  • Any spoilers should be placed in spoiler tags as such: [spoiler](spoiler goes here)[/spoiler]
Note: Unlike reviews, comments are considered temporary and may be deleted/purged without notice.
  • Previous comments (587) Loading...
  • otonhm 2022-05-15 04:13:32.415142+00
    pretty good lore too, and i like how you can impact the world significantly throughout the game like the falling star after radahn and the ashen capital after maliketh.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • lpf 2022-05-15 07:22:57.179114+00
    kirby outsold
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • blokrenblossbroms 2022-05-18 17:16:54.959694+00
    Yo he hecho una decisión educada:
    que no voy a jugar Elden Ring hasta que salgan todos los DLCs.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • Revenge319 2022-05-21 04:28:18.919069+00
    The parts I'm enjoying in Elden Ring are really good, but the parts I'm not range from underwhelming to irritating. Unsure what I'll end up rating this when I beat the game, but it'll probably be at least a little high.
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • HiddenObserver 2022-05-21 21:15:35.503781+00
    This was a fantastic first play. It felt like a genuine once in a lifetime adventure. But when the dust settled. I don't really see a reason to play it again. I'm not big on pvp like I was as a teenager, and with Renala's rebirth you can just respec many times over to try every build you need without making a new character. NG+ is essentially pointless aside from being a boss rush so you can dual wield unique weapons for power stancing, with the rest of the game being filler. Anyone else feel this way or am I crazy? Aside from actively seeking out a certain weapon again so you can dual wield them, why would you bother doing ANY of the overworld dungeons in the game again in NG+? My first play was over 100 hours, but I genuinely reached Radagon in NG+ in about 15 hours.

    If anything it made me appreciate the tightness of Bloodborne and Sekiro more. I think Sekiro might be their finest hour because it feels great, plays great and is a contained experience, but I guess if you enjoy dress up it doesn't hit the same way.
    reply
    • Qstom 2022-05-22 12:56:39.377739+00
      There is a lot of critics going towards this game on YouTube. I also made 37 minutes cirtique but it's in Polish language. In my opinion there is definitely a lot of things going completely wrong in this game and I can't just deny it, because good things, like open world and adventure it offers, goes bland very quickly. I am also a bit other from average person here, because I'm not big on Bloodborne or Dark Souls 3. I think those games are too much focused on action, and action (combat system) is too simple and boring to justify it. Sekiro is only game in long time nailing it from FromSoftware. Other than that I am only Demon's Souls/Dark Souls 1 guy
    • Ysbryd 2022-05-23 13:42:32.663346+00
      Yeah I got a few hours into NG+ before uninstalling. Great game, but the open world killed the replayability for me. Fingers crossed this gets some DLC and FromSoft moves on to make other new IPs.
    • jake7 2022-05-23 16:45:41.232426+00
      Same, really enjoyed my first playthrough (despite honestly being very annoyed and frustrated by the game for multiple hour stretches), but I started a new character in like early April, beat Godrick (my fav boss, love that fight), and then haven't had any desire to return. This is all while I have returned to DS1, Sekiro, and Bloodborne for a couple dozen hours since beating Elden Ring. Just uninstalled a couple of days ago because idk if I'll ever play this game again unless there's a DLC.
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • breakdownbbe 2022-05-21 23:22:04.983737+00
    Overhyped

    Slightly better than DS2
    DS3 and BB blow this out of the water
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • EyeSocketCrunch 2022-05-23 17:12:24.520586+00
    I think it's gonna be hard to find another game I like as much as this one
    reply
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • More comments New comments (0) Loading...
Please login or sign up to comment.

Suggestions

ADVERTISEMENT

Contribute to this page

Contributors to this page: dukkha diction fantalas okayfrog
Examples
1980s-1996
23 mar 2015
8 apr - 12 may 2015
1998-05
Report
Download
Image 1 of 2