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Castlevania: Rondo of Blood

悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻

Developer / Publisher: Konami
29 October 1993
Castlevania: Rondo of Blood [悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻] - cover art
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343 Ratings / 4 Reviews
#185 All-time
#2 for 1993
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2007 Konami  
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XNA 0 83717 26036 3 ULUS-10277
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At what point does a cult classic lose its status as such? When does a hidden gem gleam a little too brightly to the point where everyone becomes aware of it through its blinding light? The answer to both of those rhetorical questions can be traced in the legacy of Castlevania: Rondo of Blood, the fifth mainline installment in Konami’s iconic action-horror franchise. One who is ignorant about this particular game but enlightened in regards to the franchise might even wonder how a Castlevania game could even be burrowed deep into the mud of a cult classic status. The franchise’s presence on both the NES and SNES consoles as a third-party series was monumental, imprinting its legacy on the 2D platformer era with as much impact as any of Nintendo’s first-party contemporaries. Upon the franchise's fifth entry however, someone at Konami ostensibly decided to sever the Nintendo safety net and release Rondo of Blood on the PC-Engine (aka the TurboGrafx-16), the Linux of 16-bit consoles. To add another layer to Rondo of Blood’s esoteric allure, the game was only available in its native Japan, the prime factor in the game’s relegation to obscurity if confining the game to the TurboGrafx-16 wasn’t enough. Konami, feeling somewhat remorseful for their bizarre business decisions, then dumped an insufficient port of Rondo of Blood titled “Castlevania: Dracula X” on eager SNES owners anticipating the next entry. Naturally, these poor westerners were displeased. It seems baffling that Konami would go to great lengths to bite the hand that feeds them, but it seems in retrospect that whoever made this decision had the foresight of a Tibetan monk. Thanks to the revelatory creation of the internet, there is not one piece of hidden media from that past that can hide in the shadows. A decade after Rondo’s of Blood’s limited availability, public knowledge of Rondo of Blood’s existence grew rapidly enough to where Konami ported the proper version of the game on a smattering of consoles. Nowadays, Castlevania’s well-kept secret is now heralded as the pinnacle of the classic Castlevania format. Upon playing Rondo of Blood, I’m convinced that its stellar reputation stems from the long period of time that fans were clamoring for it rather than its quality.

While its exclusivity to the TurboGrafx-16 alienated so many gamers, the decision was most likely based on the alternative console’s advanced capabilities. Those lucky few who owned the system were treated to what was a marvel of presentation on a 16-bit console. Rondo of Blood’s idea of conveying an ominous introduction, a series staple for each Castlevania game, is a voice in German whose subtitles are the only thing the player sees in the darkness. Why the man is speaking German in a Japanese game set in Romania is unclear, but I digress. The narrator introduces a sinister scene of what looks like blood sacrifice in a gothic cathedral. A naked girl wrapped in a large cloth for means of both mystique and censorship is centered in the room. One plunge of a blade into her quivering body by one of the menacing-looking soldiers is enough to resurrect the dark, vampiric lord once again as he rises from his coffin. Higher graphical fidelity and a more eruptive sound were the key factors to impress players in opening Super Castlevania IV on a new system, and Rondo of Blood amplifies it to the next level. The block of text that scrolls upward after the tombstone is struck in Super Castlevania IV had to be read by the player, but the white text that pops up over the black background in the opening of Rondo of Blood introduces a vital element of video game progress: voice acting. Foreboding German voice narration and the bloody scream of a helpless virgin are less subtle than a gravestone on a misty moor, but it exudes a tense and spooky atmosphere just as effectively. Voice acting and animation aren’t merely implemented to introduce the game. Each cutscene throughout the game is fully voiced with the same animation.

Given that I’ve played and reviewed every mainline Castlevania game up to Rondo of Blood, I understand the magnificence of the animation and voice acting and the scope of progress they both signified. However, plenty of unprecedented leaps in gaming capabilities that took place in the 1990s haven’t aged gracefully, and Rondo of Blood cutscenes are a prime example of this. The choppy, languorous animation is as cheesy as the flat, directionless voice acting, which also sounds like the characters are submerged underwater thanks to the primordial sound design. Simply because gaming hit a point where these aspects were feasible doesn’t necessarily mean that developers should’ve jumped on the opportunity at their genesis. Because of how primitive the new technical frills, Rondo of Blood arguably seems more dated than Super Castlevania IV or any of its 8-bit predecessors. The pixels that the industry made strides in progressing from for so many generations have ironically aged better than any early effort in deviating from them, and Rondo of Blood is a perfect example of this. At least Rondo of Blood’s pixel art that Konami have taken years to refine and improve upon are as appealing as they ever were. Color palettes may not be as dazzling as they were in Super Castlevania IV, but the deeper tones convey a haunting atmosphere more deliberately.

Rondo of Blood is a Castlevania game marked by advancements. Besides the technical aspects, Rondo of Blood supplies the player with a new Belmont at the helm of destroying Dracula. Unlike Trevor Belmont who was one of Simon’s ancestors, Richter Belmont is adversely a descendant of Simon’s, existing in a time over a century after his relative’s vampire-hunting endeavors. The Belmont litmus test to both see the character’s heroic potential and whether or not he fits the likeness of the family is again as uncanny as it was with Trevor. Richter moves with the same sense of resolution, jumps and climbs staircases with the same rigidity, and gets dramatically blown away by anything that strikes him. He also possesses the same weapons as every Belmont before him, namely the trademark whip used to strip away the flesh of the foul creatures that lurk around Dracula’s castle.
Considering Richter has centuries of fellow Belmonts to use as inspiration, one would think he’d be the most advanced vampire slayer in comparison. Unfortunately, Richter might be a testament to the saying that talent skips a few generations. Richter’s fighting prowess recalls the limits of past Belmonts on the NES. He can execute a backflip, but when does this ever come in handy? More importantly, the player cannot whip in several different directions as Richter, for it has been restricted to the horizontal axis once again. Using the secondary weapons is also relegated to the combination of pressing up on the D-pad and the attack button simultaneously. The capabilities of what a Castlevania protagonist could do on a controller for a 16-bit system were already made apparent from Super Castlevania IV, but Rondo of Blood chooses to stray backward to a more humble control scheme. This decision was most likely due to the common criticism that Simon’s versatility with his whip mitigated the use of secondary weapons. While I’m in the camp that prefers the more flexible range, these complaints are at least understandable as I never found myself seldom using the secondary weapons in Super Castlevania IV. However, relegating the secondary weapon trigger to how it was in the NES titles takes the series a step backwards. Was the Turbo-Grafix controller not as multifaceted as a SNES controller and couldn’t supply the secondary weapon with its own trigger? Regardless, I feel as if this point of regression is indicative of Rondo of Blood’s questionable quality. A new feature that Rondo of Blood implements is a special attack with the secondary items. After accumulating a certain amount of hearts, pressing a single button will unleash a special move that coincides with whatever secondary weapon Richter is carrying. It’s a clever idea that further encourages using the items, but it’s faulty in execution. I found the special attacks to be more flashy than practical, like putting a bushel of oranges in a juicer just to squeeze out a couple of drops.

More so, Rondo of Blood is more difficult than Super Castlevania IV. It’s not as relentlessly ball-busting as two out of the three NES games due to featuring a save function, but the gameplay is much harder to hurdle over than the franchise’s previous 16-bit outing. One might think it’s due to reconverting to the rigid controls from the NES days, but this is merely a fraction of what makes Rondo of Blood’s difficulty more appalling. That’s right, appalling. Apparently, somewhere on the shadier side of the Belmont family tree, lies a trait even more recessive than being blown back by any colliding physical force. This unfortunate gene is not being given an invincibility frame; a requisite video game feature that assures the error of taking damage won’t punish the player too harshly by providing a brief moment of invulnerability so they can prop themselves back on track. Richter ostensibly has the genetic makeup of a hemophiliac as inbreeding between his Belmont ancestors has given him too many flawed quirks. Not only does Richter stumble dramatically when he is hit, but his health bar can plummet quickly in a matter of seconds due to not having a merciful window. Groups of Medusa Heads will bat Richter around like a pinball machine and getting too close to enemies will always be the imminent death for the player. Invincibility windows are paramount to fair game design and any game without them is objectively flawed, but their absence in a close-combat series like Castlevania makes their omission all the more vexing for the player.

Level design in Rondo of Blood is much less linear than it was in Super Castlevania IV. The older of the two 16-bit Castlevanias was a loyal remake to the first Castlevania, and a non-linear level progression would’ve proved to be too ambitious for an early NES game. It was however proven in the third entry on the same system that experimenting with linearity was possible on the NES, and Rondo of Blood continues where Castlevania III left off. However, Rondo of Blood’s experimentation leads the player down different directions of Dracula’s castle than Castlevania III did. Instead of choosing paths at a crossroads between levels, Rondo of Blood implores the player to wander off the beaten path of any given level on the direct course. With the save system in consideration, I’d argue that Rondo of Blood should have adopted Castlevania III’s method of nonlinearity to facilitate multiple playthroughs. As it is, Rondo of Blood’s methods of revisiting levels with a stage select feature is a competent way of fostering exploration.

If the player doesn’t take the time to meticulously explore the vicinity, one of the primary objectives will be incomplete. Unlike his forefathers, Richter’s mission to defeat Dracula isn’t because he’s a noble warrior. Richter needed some motivation to carry on his family’s legacy as Dracula is holding four captured maidens all over his estate, one of them being Richter’s fiance. These ill-fated damsels are located in secret corners of the castle which can only be accessed off of the beaten path. Once they are found, an animated cutscene plays and the girls commend Richter for their heroic deeds. The reward for rescuing these girls is practically nothing and it does not affect the course for the rest of the game, but it’s confusing as to why the developers would relegate their roles as optional fetch quests considering their precedence in the story. I think rescuing all four of them should have unlocked the full ending of the game, adding an additional layer of incentive to play the game meticulously. Concepts like “true endings” may have been too radical an idea for the 16-bit era, but hindsight is always 20/20.

One of these four maidens is also Rondo of Blood’s secondary protagonist. Tossing a key into the lock of an underground door in the second main level will uncover a ritual of sorts being conducted on a blonde girl in a pink dress. Upon interrupting this incantation, the blonde girl will float down into Richter’s loving arms and thank him kindly. Her name is Maria Renard, a giddy young girl from a fellow vampire-hunting family. She is offended at Richter’s laughing condescension when she insists on aiding him in his quest, but the player will know not to judge Maria by her appearance. By stating her role as a secondary protagonist, I don’t mean in the narrative. Saving Maria will unlock Rondo of Blood’s only other playable character. Subtracting the number of playable characters from Castlevania IIIs three may seem disappointing, but Maria’s inclusion is more than enough. Maria’s tactics are completely different than any Belmont’s, adding additional frills to her moveset. She can double jump, slide on the ground like Mega Man, and her base attack are two doves whose trajectory is the same as Richter’s whip with the added perk of doing damage on reentry like a boomerang. Her secondary weapons are all various animal friends like a cat, tortoise, dragon, and parrot that cover as many bases as the usual ax, holy water, etc. Richter should wipe that smug grin off his face because Maria is far better at eliminating vampiric threats than him or anyone else in his family. What better tool to use against the legions of the damned than purity and chastity? In fact, Maria seems to be TOO good with some criticizing playing as her making the game far too easy. Maria’s defense is lower than Richter’s, but the player will ideally never get hit due to the higher damage output of her doves. Her sweetness, frilliness, and sickeningly cute demeanor leads me to believe that she’s Konami’s attempt to cater to girls to a transparent degree. If Castlevania was missing a much needed demographic, it’s the little sisters of Japanese Turbo-Grafix owners. Even the roasts that Richter consumes in the cracked-out walls shift into sugary foods like parfaits and birthday cake when playing as Maria. Do girls not need protein in their diets? Maria is a market decision as condescending towards young women as Richter is, but I’d be lying if I didn’t find myself playing as her for most of the time.

If unlocking a makeshift easy mode and a few hidden cutscenes don’t tickle your curiosity, I still beseech everyone to go the extra lengths to search every path this game offers. The secret paths add much needed variety to the typical climb from the base of the grounds to the tip of Dracula’s peak. The secret routes run the gamut of different foregrounds ranging from jungles, watery wharfs, to temples with flowing water streaming through the foundation. One alternate route is a level in daylight of all things. Each level might not be as creative and stylized as the individual levels from Castlevania IV, but the variation provided here is a breath of fresh air upon the fifth trek up this godforsaken building. The secret routes will also lead to some eclectic boss fights. Among the series standards like The Grim Reaper and a boss gauntlet that revisits each boss from the first game in order, Rondo of Blood adds a smattering of high-stakes bosses from other mythical horror sources. For example, the secret path will have Richter and Maria fighting a serpent that slithers along a bridge over water, a pile of skeletons that take the shape of many forms, a naked banshee riding a giant skull, etc. The dark wizard Shaft takes the peculiar role of acting as Dracula’s right-hand man, demoting the Grim Reaper for the sake of variety. The final fight against Dracula is surprisingly the bout I expected from Super Castlevania IV because it’s the fight from the first game with more impressive graphical flair. The ending will differ depending on whether the player finishes Dracula with either Richter or Maria, but either will result in Dracula’s demise with his tower crumbling on the horizon as usual.

If Castlevania: Rondo of Blood was released in its full glory to the western world back in 1993, the 16-bit wars would’ve reached a point of bloody mayhem that Sega, the prime instigators of this capitalistic battle, would’ve stayed out of. Those few who owned the niche Turbo-Grafix-16 system would’ve been treated to a hallmark game on the system that made Nintendo fans all the more covetous, given that it’s an entry to a series that stands as a reason to have kept purchasing Nintendo’s consoles way back when. Alas, this is merely a case of alternative history, for Rondo of Blood’s adulation is in retrospect after so many years. The appeal of finally being able to play Castlevania’s well-kept secret has caused a rise in the game’s placement among the rest of the titles in the series which I always thought was unjust. I’ve always thought that Super Castlevania IV was the superior 16-bit Castlevania game, and those who favor Rondo of Blood criticize Super Castlevania IV just as fervently. I now see that both camps have substantial arguments for their respective opinions. Super Castlevania IV is a more orthodox Castlevania game whose mission was to refine the first game with the advancements of the SNES, as was the initiative for many sequels on the console. On the other hand, I admire Rondo of Blood’s greater ambition in progressing the series. I still stand by my stance that Super Castlevania IV is the better game because it’s much fairer to the player, and that was a vital aspect of Super Castlevania IV’s evolution not seen in Rondo of Blood. I suppose I can be thankful that westerners finally got to experience Richter Belmont in his finest form on a worthy entry in the series rather than that god-awful port of this game that we initially received on the SNES.
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Erockthestrange 2019-04-13T16:48:14Z
2019-04-13T16:48:14Z
8.0
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So, after playing Dracula X, I thought that the best move would be to keep trying to track down a way to play the original Rondo of Blood, and not the ugly looking PSP version of it. Fortunately, Castlevania Requiem on the PS4 gave me the opportunity to do this, allowing me to be able to compare Dracula X with this and finally get some perspective into why one of them is so praised while the other is left by the wayside. Honestly, gotta say that after playing this one, I’m totally with anyone who would consider Dracula X a genuinely bad game if they’ve already played this, because the difference is absolutely night and day. While the mediocre SNES game felt like a botched attempt to be a game full of homages to previous entries, ultimately feeling derivative and bland for the most part, this one feels like a true love letter to everything that made those games good, and a whole lot more.

Immediately upon starting this up, it was already clear that there was some serious ambition behind this game, with dramatic cutscenes that while admittedly painfully cheesy to say the least, immediately gave the game some unique charm not seen in any previous entry. This is complemented by a much more energetic, uplifting soundtrack for the most part compared to the previous ones that felt far more atmospheric, but both of them work quite well, with me honestly personally preferring a lot of this one. Immediately the game feels as if it’s recontextualising old, classic parts of past games through its opening level, with scenery and layout that is a direct reference to the towns in Simon’s Quest, with the second level then throwing the player into something quite similar to Castlevania 1’s opening level. This works here for a number of reasons when compared to poor attempts at similar things in past games due to how well a lot of these ideas have been recontextualised, with Richter moving similarly to Simon, but with a bit more fluidity in his movements and the ability to backflip, something that’s able to come in handy at many points for those willing to be a bit gutsier with their offensive approach. Subweapons also feel useful in this game, which is the first time they really have in the series for quite a while, with the addition of item crashes giving more potential options to be able to get out of tough situations, something which I personally found myself using quite often for various purposes, from using them as a quick screen clear for when things got overwhelming, to getting a ton of extra damage on a boss, to even using the starting invincibility frames to avoid death. What makes this even better is how just like everything else in this game, the presentation of these special moves is absolutely top notch, making you feel truly powerful as you unleash these monstrous attacks.

Of course, presentation and homages would be nothing without good design to back this up, and this game has absolutely amazing design across the board to the point where I never felt as if the game was unfair, despite some gruelling challenges along the way. This is another game where once again, much of its challenge comes less from an individual ruthless section that requires near inhuman precision to complete, and instead acts as an endurance test, constantly keeping the player on their toes through increasingly challenging situations while never simply overwhelming the player, making progression consistently exciting and satisfying to make your way through each location, bringing back the magic of discovery that Dracula X had completely lost. I feel like the part of the game that exemplifies the game’s fair, but difficult approach to difficulty, along with its identity as partially a love letter to the series, is the battle against the dark priest Shaft. As the player walks into the boss room, they are immediately greeted to a remixed version of the original Castlevania’s boss theme, before Shaft then puts the player through a gauntlet of the original game’s first 4 fights, one after the other. On their own, each of these prove to be relatively simple to take down, but having to beat all 4 in a row ends up proving to be one of the game’s hardest moments. While this could easily be seen as cheap fanservice and nostalgia baiting, what sets this apart is how it’s executed in such a way where it stands extremely strong even without considering the context involved, each fight being designed rather well, giving the player ample opportunities to attack and dodge while all feeling extremely distinct and worthwhile to fight, and ends up serving as the highlight of the entire game, something which only feels amplified once the context is added.

Now so far I’ve been mostly talking to this as if it’s structured like any old Castlevania game, but where it really shines is in its ambition in some respects I haven’t talked about. For one, I went through a second playthrough of the game as the other character, Maria, who further demonstrates the game’s somewhat more reasonable approach to difficulty by essentially acting as an easy mode, giving the player a lot of additional mobility options, such as a dodge roll and double jump, along with providing them with a much more powerful arsenal than Richter, at the cost of taking double damage. What I really love about this is how distinctive Maria feels, all the way down to having her own cutscenes for each key scene in the game, making her feel like a properly thought out addition to the game rather than a mere afterthought.

The other aspect that really stands out about this is how the early stages are designed to be absolutely full of little secrets and diverging paths, some simply leading to alternate ways to get through the level, and others leading to entirely new boss fights and stages, each of them also with their own unique elements to it, giving the game a lot of replayability without making one route feel like the clear option, with both being similarly balanced for the most part, along with being very fun, overcoming the glaring issue with Castlevania III’s multiple paths. Many of these stages also have their own special aspects to them that make them stand out extremely clearly, some big examples including the chase with the behemoth in the opening stage, and a fast paced ride down a large waterfall while trying to stop enemies from knocking you off your piece of driftwood. The amount of detail in each of these stages surpasses anything from prior games without it even being something close, and it really brings the game up to the point where I could see myself replaying the game for a 3rd time and still have a largely fresh experience due to the amount of other paths there were within some of these stages, even if they lead to the same destination.

Overall, there’s really little doubt in my mind that this is easily my favourite of the classic Castlevania games, being a remarkable love letter to the series up to this point without sacrificing any quality as a game standing on its own. The amount of depth and variety to the level design, combined with the absolutely stellar presentation made the game an absolute joy to play from start to finish, without any moments that really dip in quality, making it that if I were to replay the game, that there’d be no moments of dread in having to go through certain parts again, something that even the excellent Super Castlevania IV doesn’t completely succeed in. Ultimately, everything about this game is expertly crafted, and good enough to make me almost retrospectively dislike Dracula X a whole lot more for capturing almost none of what made this game so good.
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Kempokid 2021-06-26T09:44:11Z
2021-06-26T09:44:11Z
4.5
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Rondo is a huge step in the right direction for the series, despite being one of the shortest Castlevania games. Castlevania IV was a good game for its time, but many annoyances held it back like being able to die from falling like 10 feet once the screen panned up and having annoying platforming segments, along with still being a bit more difficult than fun. Rondo of Blood is when elements of the series started resembling future games, the biggest improvement of Rondo is you can no longer fall to your death, if there is a platform beneath you, you will land on it. No more frustration of missing a jump once the screen pans up and then dying from a 10 foot fall. The other thing is Rondo feels a bit more streamlined, enemies don't feel like they hit you as hard and bosses feel more manageable. The other thing is when you get items to use in this game I feel like they use less points and you get far more use of them. Now Rondo still has problems, its very short and can be beaten in around an hour, the game does tend to be a bit easy, and the cutscenes just haven't aged well. Its cool that this is a prequel to Symphony of the Night and it leads into the game in a way, but I feel Rondo had good ideas but wasn't fleshed out enough, it feels like it almost could have been an add on or expansion to one of the other games. But for what its worth, it is the best of the original linear Castlevania games and has the best gameplay of those, but Symphony made so many improvements on the franchise that looking back to any of these games makes them feel a bit dated.
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jweber14 2018-10-20T10:18:42Z
2018-10-20T10:18:42Z
3.5
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Don't worry: I don’t have any idea what a rondo is either, not to mention how you fill it full of blood.

Released in 1993, the Rondo of Blood never made it overseas in its original form to the dismay of Castlevania [悪魔城ドラキュラ] fans. It soon became one of the most esoteric games of its era due to its obscure platform (PC Engine CD) and high bidding price on eBay. Thanks to the Wii’s Virtual Console, you’ll only need to spend $9 rather than $120. Even that is a high asking price for such an old game, but what you are getting is one of the best of the series that holds up just as well as its Super Nintendo and PlayStation entries, despite the lack of built-in nostalgia. The game’s multi-path level design, hidden playable characters, clever set pieces, intense boss fights, and lush soundtrack (thanks to its original disc format) set it apart. I don’t think I would have had nearly as fun, however, if it weren’t for Rose, a character unique to this entry that has fluidity and range that will make the rest of the game much easier as well as give it a much different feel. The game is brief but with multiple paths and playable characters, you’ll want to play it at least twice. After many lackluster handheld entries and the recent Castlevania Rebirth (also for Wii), this is the true return to the series fans wanted even if in reality it’s merely a missing chapter.
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SUPER_Lonely_Panda 2016-04-04T21:08:01Z
2016-04-04T21:08:01Z
4.0
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Catalog

DavidSS 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-09-26T02:28:02Z
2022-09-26T02:28:02Z
3.5
1
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
goeie_oko 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-09-14T09:41:27Z
2022-09-14T09:41:27Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
serie: castlevania
Dragame 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-09-06T16:35:45Z
2022-09-06T16:35:45Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
dragoonWho 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-09-01T15:44:23Z
2022-09-01T15:44:23Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
isaacyote 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-30T01:42:29Z
2022-08-30T01:42:29Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
SneedDeck Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles 2022-08-29T15:51:49Z
PSP • XNA
2022-08-29T15:51:49Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
ectopicsage 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-27T11:29:24Z
2022-08-27T11:29:24Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
rustedpeices 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-25T23:12:57Z
TurboGrafx-CD/CD-ROM² • JP
2022-08-25T23:12:57Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
gfly1994 Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles 2022-08-20T03:47:24Z
PSP • XNA
2022-08-20T03:47:24Z
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Epoic1200 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-18T21:07:05Z
2022-08-18T21:07:05Z
4.0
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
ruth1120 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-16T06:45:09Z
2022-08-16T06:45:09Z
4.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
cineraria 悪魔城ドラキュラX 血の輪廻 2022-08-13T16:14:11Z
TurboGrafx-CD/CD-ROM² • JP
2022-08-13T16:14:11Z
3.5
In collection Want to buy Used to own  
Player modes
Single-player
Media
1x CD-ROM
Also known as
  • Castlevania: Rondo of Blood
  • Akumajō Dracula X: Chi no Rondo
  • 悪魔城ドラキュラ Xクロニクル
  • Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles
  • Akumajō Dorakyura Ekkusu Kuronikuru
  • Devil's Castle Dracula X Chronicle
  • View all [6] Hide

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  • Previous comments (10) Loading...
  • MisTurHappy 2022-04-04 13:50:16.300706+00
    Find a flaw
    reply
    • Bakumatsuroman 2022-04-20 13:35:27.211143+00
      I can't
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • SMZXW 2022-07-01 16:16:28.970647+00
    maria's turtles
    reply
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  • WinterMirage 2022-08-06 23:24:01.593514+00
    Just beat this for the first time and what an incredible way for the Classicvania lineage to conclude with. Probably the best 2d action I've ever played.
    reply
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  • ruth1120 2022-08-12 11:25:31.451992+00
    loving this game so far, just hurts so bad with 4 continues :sob:
    reply
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  • ruth1120 2022-08-16 06:45:27.032114+00
    nvrmind i got good its fine
    reply
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  • ruth1120 2022-08-16 06:45:55.007233+00
    p.s. if you savestate you have cheated not only the game but yourself
    reply
    • heavymetalthunder 2022-09-11 01:44:11.790097+00
      Let people have fun
    • ruth1120 2022-09-16 22:06:59.466522+00
      actually though the fun in this game is how it demands mastery, 3 lives per stage is an intentional design choice and to circumvent that is a bad idea. If you only have to beat a section once you may just damage boost or scrape past without really understanding and overcoming the challenge presented
    • heavymetalthunder 2022-09-30 18:04:06.39075+00
      i agree with you but people can play the game however they want, its not cheating yourself imo. If you want the real challenge, obviously you would not use save states
    • More replies New replies ) Loading...
  • dontwannaknow 2022-09-25 23:06:07.940788+00
    Castlevania: Chris Paul of Blood
    reply
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